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I Bet You
The
The
pronoun you is the second-person personal pronoun, both singular and plural, and both nominative and oblique case in Modern English. The
The
oblique (objective) form, you, functioned previously in the roles of both accusative and dative, as well as all instances following a preposition. The
The
possessive forms of you are your (used before a noun) and yours (used in place of a noun)
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Ure (other)
Ure may refer to:Ure, Albania River Ure Ure Museum of Greek Archaeology, Reading, England Oriya people, and Indian gotra also known as the "Ures" Ure or urus, French for AurochsAs a surname of Scottish origin:Alan Ure, English football manager Alexander Ure, 1st
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African American Vernacular English
Origins of the civil rights movement
Origins of the civil rights movement
· Civil rights movement
Civil rights movement
· Black Power movementPost–civil rights era
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Thou
The word thou (/ðaʊ/) is a second person singular pronoun in English. It is now largely archaic, having been replaced in almost all contexts by you. It is used in parts of Northern England
England
and in Scots (/ðu/), and also in rural parts of Newfoundland
Newfoundland
albeit as a recessive feature.[3] Thou
Thou
is the nominative form; the oblique/objective form is thee (functioning as both accusative and dative), the possessive is thy (adjective) or thine (adjective before a vowel or pronoun) and the reflexive is thyself
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T–V Distinction
In sociolinguistics, a T–V distinction
T–V distinction
(from the Latin
Latin
pronouns tu and vos) is a contrast, within one language, between various forms of addressing one's conversation partner or partners that are specialized for varying levels of politeness, social distance, courtesy, familiarity, age or insult toward the addressee. Many languages lack this type of distinction, instead relying on more explicit wording to convey these meanings. The morphosyntactic T–V distinction, though, is found in a variety of languages around the world. Modern English technically has the T–V distinction, manifested in the pronouns thou and you, though the familiar thou is no longer used in most contemporary dialects. Additionally British commoners have historically spoken to nobility and royalty using the third person rather than the second person, a practice that has fallen out of favor
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Literature
Literature, most generically, is any body of written works. More restrictively, literature is writing considered to be an art form, or any single writing deemed to have artistic or intellectual value, often due to deploying language in ways that differ from ordinary usage. Its Latin root literatura/litteratura (derived itself from littera: letter or handwriting) was used to refer to all written accounts, though contemporary definitions extend the term to include texts that are spoken or sung (oral literature). The concept has changed meaning over time: nowadays it can broaden to have non-written verbal art forms, and thus it is difficult to agree on its origin, which can be paired with that of language or writing itself
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King James Version
The King James Version
King James Version
(KJV), also known as the King James Bible
Bible
(KJB) or simply the Authorized Version (AV), is an English translation of the Christian Bible
Bible
for the Church of England, begun in 1604 and completed in 1611.[a] The books of the King James Version
King James Version
include the 39 books of the Old Testament, an intertestamental section containing 14 books of the Apocrypha and the 27 books of the New Testament. It was first printed by the King's Printer Robert Barker and was the third translation into English approved by the English Church authorities
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God
In monotheistic thought, God
God
is conceived of as the Supreme Being
Supreme Being
and the principal object of faith.[3] The concept of God, as described by theologians, commonly includes the attributes of omniscience (all-knowing), omnipotence (unlimited power), omnipresence (present everywhere), divine simplicity, and as having an eternal and necessary existence. In agnostic thought, the existence of God
God
is unknown and/or unknowable
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Shakespeare
William Shakespeare
Shakespeare
(/ˈʃeɪkspɪər/; 26 April 1564 (baptised) – 23 April 1616)[a] was an English poet, playwright and actor, widely regarded as the greatest writer in the English language and the world's pre-eminent dramatist.[2][3][4] He is often called England's national poet and the "Bard of Avon".[5][b] His extant works, including collaborations, consist of approximately 39 plays,[c] 154 sonnets, two long narrative poems and a few other verses, some of uncertain authorship. His plays have been translated into every major living language and are performed more often than those of any other playwright.[7] Shakespeare
Shakespeare
was born and brought up in Stratford-upon-Avon, Warwickshire. At the age of 18, he married Anne Hathaway, with whom he had three children: Susanna and twins Hamnet and Judith
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Drama
Drama
Drama
is the specific mode of fiction represented in performance; a play performed in a theatre, or on radio or television.[1] Considered as a genre of poetry in general, the dramatic mode has been contrasted with the epic and the lyrical modes ever since Aristotle's Poetics (c. 335 BC)—the earliest work of dramatic theory.[2] The term "drama" comes from a Greek word meaning "action" (Classical Greek: δρᾶμα, drama), which is derived from "I do" (Classical Greek: δράω, drao). The two masks associated with drama represent the traditional generic division between comedy and tragedy. They are symbols of the ancient Greek Muses, Thalia, and Melpomene
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Romeo And Juliet
Romeo
Romeo
and Juliet
Juliet
is a tragedy written by William Shakespeare
William Shakespeare
early in his career about two young star-crossed lovers whose deaths ultimately reconcile their feuding families. It was among Shakespeare's most popular plays during his lifetime and along with Hamlet, is one of his most frequently performed plays. Today, the title characters are regarded as archetypal young lovers. Romeo
Romeo
and Juliet
Juliet
belongs to a tradition of tragic romances stretching back to antiquity. The plot is based on an Italian tale translated into verse as The Tragical History of Romeus and Juliet
The Tragical History of Romeus and Juliet
by Arthur Brooke in 1562 and retold in prose in Palace of Pleasure
Palace of Pleasure
by William Painter in 1567
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Y'all
Y'all
Y'all
(/jɑːl/ yahl)[2]) is a contraction of you and all (sometimes combined as you-all). It is used as a (usually plural) second-person pronoun. The exclusive usage of y'all as a plural pronoun is a perennial subject of discussion. Y'all
Y'all
is strongly associated with Southern American English,[3] and appears in other English varieties, including African American Vernacular English and South African Indian English.Contents1 Etymology 2 Linguistic characteristics2.1 Singular usage 2.2 Possessive forms 2.3 All y'all3 Regional usage3.1 United States 3.2 South Africa 3.3 Rest of world4 See also 5 ReferencesEtymology[edit] Y'all
Y'all
arose as a contraction of you-all
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Southern United States
The Southern United States, also known as the American South, Dixie, Dixieland and the South, is a region of the United States
United States
of America. The South does not fully match the geographic south of the United States but is commonly defined as including the states that fought for the Confederate States of America
Confederate States of America
in the American Civil War.[2] The Deep South
Deep South
is fully located in the southeastern corner
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Abaco Islands
The Abaco Islands
Abaco Islands
lie in the northern Bahamas
Bahamas
180 miles (290 km) east of South Florida
South Florida
with similar weather with the exception of local patterns. They comprise the main islands of Great Abaco and Little Abaco, along with smaller barrier cays. The northernmost are Walker's Cay, and its sister island Grand Cay. To the south, the next inhabited islands are Spanish Cay
Cay
and Green Turtle Cay, with its settlement of New Plymouth, Great Guana Cay, private Scotland Cay, Man-O-War Cay, and Elbow Cay, with its settlement of Hope Town. Southernmost are Tilloo Cay
Cay
and Lubbers Quarters. Another of note off Abaco's western shore is onetime Gorda Cay, now a Disney Island and cruise ship stop and renamed Castaway Cay. Also in the vicinity is Moore's Island
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Verb
A verb, from the Latin
Latin
verbum meaning word, is a word (part of speech) that in syntax conveys an action (bring, read, walk, run, learn), an occurrence (happen, become), or a state of being (be, exist, stand). In the usual description of English, the basic form, with or without the particle to, is the infinitive. In many languages, verbs are inflected (modified in form) to encode tense, aspect, mood, and voice. A verb may also agree with the person, gender or number of some of its arguments, such as its subject, or object
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Saint Helena
Saint Helena
Saint Helena
(/ˌsɪnt həˈliːnə/ SINT-hə-LEE-nə) is a volcanic tropical island in the South Atlantic
South Atlantic
Ocean, 4,000 kilometres (2,500 mi) east of Rio de Janeiro
Rio de Janeiro
and 1,950 kilometres (1,210 mi) west of the Cunene River, which marks the border between Namibia
Namibia
and Angola
Angola
in southwestern Africa. It is part of the British Overseas Territory of Saint Helena, Ascension and Tristan da Cunha.[3] Saint Helena
Saint Helena
measures about 16 by 8 kilometres (10 by 5 mi) and has a population of 4,534 (2016 census).[2] It was named after Saint Helena
Saint Helena
of Constantinople. It is one of the most remote islands in the world, and was uninhabited when discovered by the Portuguese in 1502
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