HOME TheInfoList.com
Providing Lists of Related Topics to Help You Find Great Stuff
[::MainTopicLength::#1500] [::ListTopicLength::#1000] [::ListLength::#15] [::ListAdRepeat::#3]

ISO 31-4
ISO 31-4 is the part of international standard ISO 31 that defines names and symbols for quantities and units related to heat. It is superseded by ISO 80000-5
[...More...]

"ISO 31-4" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

International Standard
INTERNATIONAL STANDARDS are standards developed by international standards organizations . International standards are available for consideration and use worldwide. The most prominent organization is the International Organization for Standardization (ISO). CONTENTS * 1 Purpose * 2 History * 2.1 Standardization * 2.2 International organizations * 3 See also * 4 References * 5 External links PURPOSEInternational standards may be used either by direct application or by a process of modifying an international standard to suit local conditions
[...More...]

"International Standard" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

ISO 31
ISO 31 (Quantities and units , International Organization for Standardization , 1992) is a deprecated international standard for the use of physical quantities and units of measurement , and formulas involving them, in scientific and educational documents. It is superseded by ISO/IEC 80000
[...More...]

"ISO 31" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

Physical Quantity
A PHYSICAL QUANTITY is a physical property of a phenomenon , body, or substance, that can be quantified by measurement . A physical quantity can be expressed as the combination of a magnitude expressed by a number – usually a real number – and a unit ; for example, 6973167492749999999♠1.6749275×10−27 kg (the mass of the neutron ), or 7008299792458000000♠299792458 metres per second (the speed of light ). Physical quantities are measured as n u {textstyle nu} _ where n {textstyle n} is the magnitude and u {textstyle u} is the unit. For example: A boy has measured the length of a room as 3 m. Here 3 is magnitude and m (metre) is the unit. 3 m can also be written as 300 cm. The same physical quantity x {textstyle x} can be represented equivalently in many unit systems, i.e._ x = n 1 u 1 = n 2 u 2 {textstyle x=n_{1}u_{1}=n_{2}u_{2}}
[...More...]

"Physical Quantity" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Physical Unit
A UNIT OF MEASUREMENT is a definite magnitude of a quantity , defined and adopted by convention or by law, that is used as a standard for measurement of the same quantity. Any other value of that quantity can be expressed as a simple multiple of the unit of measurement. For example, length is a physical quantity . The metre is a unit of length that represents a definite predetermined length. When we say 10 metres (or 10 m), we actually mean 10 times the definite predetermined length called "metre". The definition, agreement, and practical use of units of measurement have played a crucial role in human endeavour from early ages up to this day. Different systems of units used to be very common. Now there is a global standard, the International System of Units
International System of Units
(SI), the modern form of the metric system . In trade, WEIGHTS AND MEASURES is often a subject of governmental regulation, to ensure fairness and transparency
[...More...]

"Physical Unit" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

ISO 80000-5
ISO 80000 or IEC 80000 is an international standard promulgated jointly by the International Organization for Standardization (ISO) and the International Electrotechnical Commission
International Electrotechnical Commission
(IEC). The standard introduces the International System of Quantities (ISQ). It is a style guide for the use of physical quantities and units of measurement , formulas involving them, and their corresponding units, in scientific and educational documents for worldwide use. In most countries, the notations used in mathematics and science textbooks at schools and universities follow closely the guidelines in this standard. The ISO/IEC 80000 family of standards was completed with the publication of Part 1 in November 2009
[...More...]

"ISO 80000-5" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Thermodynamic Temperature
THERMODYNAMIC TEMPERATURE is the absolute measure of temperature and is one of the principal parameters of thermodynamics . Thermodynamic temperature
Thermodynamic temperature
is defined by the third law of thermodynamics in which the theoretically lowest temperature is the null or zero point. At this point, absolute zero , the particle constituents of matter have minimal motion and can become no colder. In the quantum-mechanical description, matter at absolute zero is in its ground state , which is its state of lowest energy . Thermodynamic temperature is often also called ABSOLUTE TEMPERATURE, for two reasons: one, proposed by Kelvin, that it does not depend on the properties of a particular material; two that it refers to an absolute zero according to the properties of the ideal gas. The International System of Units specifies a particular scale for thermodynamic temperature
[...More...]

"Thermodynamic Temperature" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

International Temperature Scale Of 1990
The INTERNATIONAL TEMPERATURE SCALE OF 1990 (ITS-90) published by the Consultative Committee for Thermometry (CCT) of the International Committee for Weights and Measures (CIPM) is an equipment calibration standard for making measurements on the Kelvin and Celsius temperature scales . ITS–90 is an approximation of the thermodynamic temperature scale that facilitates the comparability and compatibility of temperature measurements internationally. It specifies fourteen calibration points ranging from 0.65±0 K to 1357.77±0 K (-272.50±0 °C to 1084.62±0 °C) and is subdivided into multiple temperature ranges which overlap in some instances. ITS-90 is the latest (as of 2014) of a series of International Temperature Scales adopted by CIPM since 1927. Adopted at the 1989 General Conference on Weights and Measures, it supersedes the International Practical Temperature Scale of 1968 (amended edition of 1975) and the 1976 "Provisional 0.5 K to 30 K Temperature Scale"
[...More...]

"International Temperature Scale Of 1990" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Celsius Temperature
The CELSIUS SCALE, also known as the CENTIGRADE SCALE, is an SI scale and unit of measurement for temperature . As an SI derived unit , it is used by most countries in the world. It is named after the Swedish astronomer Anders Celsius (1701–1744), who developed a similar temperature scale. The DEGREE CELSIUS (symbol: °C) can refer to a specific temperature on the Celsius scale as well as a unit to indicate a temperature interval , a difference between two temperatures or an uncertainty . Before being renamed to honour Anders Celsius in 1948, the unit was called centigrade, from the Latin centum, which means 100, and gradus, which means steps
[...More...]

"Celsius Temperature" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

Degree Rankine
The RANKINE SCALE (/ˈræŋkɪn/ ) is an absolute scale of thermodynamic temperature named after the Glasgow University
Glasgow University
engineer and physicist William John Macquorn Rankine , who proposed it in 1859. (The Kelvin scale was first proposed in 1848.) It may be used in engineering systems where heat computations are done using degrees Fahrenheit. The symbol for DEGREES RANKINE is °R (or °Ra if necessary to distinguish it from the Rømer and Réaumur scales). By analogy with kelvin, some authors term the unit rankine, omitting the degree symbol. Zero on both the Kelvin and Rankine scales is absolute zero , but a temperature difference of one Rankine degree is defined as equal to one Fahrenheit degree, rather than the Celsius degree used on the Kelvin scale. A temperature of −459.67 °F is exactly equal to 0 °R
[...More...]

"Degree Rankine" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Degree Fahrenheit
The FAHRENHEIT SCALE is a temperature scale based on one proposed in 1724 by Amsterdam-based physicist Daniel Gabriel Fahrenheit (1686–1736), after whom the scale is named. It uses the DEGREE FAHRENHEIT (symbol: °F) as the unit. Several accounts of how he originally defined his scale exist. The lower defining point, 0 °F, was established as the temperature of a solution of brine made from equal parts of ice and salt. Further limits were established as the melting point of ice (32 °F) and his best estimate of the average human body temperature (96 °F, about 2.6 °F less than the modern value due to a later redefinition of the scale). The scale is now usually defined by two fixed points: the temperature at which water freezes into ice is defined as 32 °F, and the boiling point of water is defined to be 212 °F, a 180 °F separation, as defined at sea level and standard atmospheric pressure
[...More...]

"Degree Fahrenheit" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

British Thermal Unit
The BRITISH THERMAL UNIT (BTU or BTU) is a traditional unit of heat ; it is defined as the amount of heat required to raise the temperature of one pound of water by one degree Fahrenheit . It is part of the British Imperial system of units. Its counterpart in the metric system is the calorie , which is defined as the amount of heat required to raise the temperature of one gram of water by one degree Celsius . Heat is now known to be equivalent to energy, for which the SI unit is the joule ; one BTU is about 1055 joules. While units of heat are often supplanted by energy units in scientific work, they are still important in many fields. As examples, in the United States the price of natural gas is quoted in dollars per million BTUs. Chemical bond energies are often given in calories per mole of substance
[...More...]

"British Thermal Unit" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

Calorie
CALORIES are units of energy . Various definitions exist but fall into two broad categories. * The SMALL CALORIE or GRAM CALORIE (symbol: CAL) is the approximate amount of energy needed to raise the temperature of one gram of water by one degree Celsius at a pressure of one atmosphere . * The LARGE CALORIE or KILOGRAM CALORIE (symbol: CAL), also known as the FOOD CALORIE and similar names, is defined in terms of the kilogram rather than the gram. It is equal to 7003100000000000000♠1000 small calories or 1 KILOCALORIE (symbol: KCAL). Although these units relate to the metric system all forms of the calorie were deemed obsolete in science after the SI system was adopted in the 1950s. The unit of energy in the International System of Units is the joule . One small calorie is approximately 4.2 joules (so one large calorie is about 4.2 kilojoules )
[...More...]

"Calorie" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

International Organization For Standardization
The INTERNATIONAL ORGANIZATION FOR STANDARDIZATION (ISO) is an international standard -setting body composed of representatives from various national standards organizations . Founded on 23 February 1947, the organization promotes worldwide proprietary, industrial and commercial standards . It is headquartered in Geneva , Switzerland, and as of Marc