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ISO 31-4
ISO 31-4 is the part of international standard ISO 31 that defines names and symbols for quantities and units related to heat
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International Standard
International standards are standards developed by international standards organizations. International standards are available for consideration and use worldwide. The most prominent organization is the International Organization for Standardization
International Organization for Standardization
(ISO).Contents1 Purpose 2 History2.1 Standardization 2.2 International organizations3 See also 4 References 5 External linksPurpose[edit] International standards may be used either by direct application or by a process of modifying an international standard to suit local conditions
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Celsius Temperature
The Celsius
Celsius
scale, previously known as the centigrade scale,[1][2] is a temperature scale used by the International System of Units
International System of Units
(SI). As an SI derived unit, it is used by all countries in the world, except the United States, Myanmar, and Liberia. It is named after the Swedish astronomer Anders Celsius
Anders Celsius
(1701–1744), who developed a similar temperature scale. The degree Celsius
Celsius
(symbol: °C) can refer to a specific temperature on the Celsius
Celsius
scale as well as a unit to indicate a temperature interval, a difference between two temperatures or an uncertainty
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Envelope
An envelope is a common packaging item, usually made of thin flat material. It is designed to contain a flat object, such as a letter or card. Traditional envelopes are made from sheets of paper cut to one of three shapes: a rhombus, a short-arm cross or a kite. These shapes allow for the creation of the envelope structure by folding the sheet sides around a central rectangular area
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Kappa Number
The Kappa number is an indication of the residual lignin content or bleachability of wood pulp by a standardised analysis method.Contents1 Measuring method 2 Application 3 References 4 External linksMeasuring method[edit] The Kappa number is determined by ISO 302:2004.[1] ISO 302 is applicable to all kinds of chemical and semi-chemical pulps and gives a Kappa number in the range of 1-100. The Kappa number is a measurement of standard potassium permanganate solution that the pulp will consume. The measurement is inflated by the presence of hexenuronic acids in the pulp
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Degree Fahrenheit
The Fahrenheit
Fahrenheit
scale is a temperature scale based on one proposed in 1724 by Dutch-German-Polish physicist Daniel Gabriel Fahrenheit (1686–1736).[1] It uses the degree Fahrenheit
Fahrenheit
(symbol: °F) as the unit
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Degree Rankine
The Rankine scale (/ˈræŋkɪn/) is an absolute scale of thermodynamic temperature named after the Glasgow University
Glasgow University
engineer and physicist William John Macquorn Rankine, who proposed it in 1859. (The Kelvin
Kelvin
scale was first proposed in 1848.)[1] It may be used in engineering systems where heat computations are done using degrees Fahrenheit. The symbol for degrees Rankine is °R[2] (or °Ra if necessary to distinguish it from the Rømer and Réaumur scales). By analogy with kelvin, some authors term the unit rankine, omitting the degree symbol.[3][4] Zero on both the Kelvin
Kelvin
and Rankine scales is absolute zero, but a temperature difference of one Rankine degree is defined as equal to one Fahrenheit
Fahrenheit
degree, rather than the Celsius
Celsius
degree used on the Kelvin
Kelvin
scale
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List Of ISO Romanizations
List of ISO standards for transliterations and transcriptions (or romanizations): ISO 9 — Cyrillic ISO 233 — Arabic ISO 259 — Hebrew ISO 843 — Greek ISO 3602 — J
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International Temperature Scale Of 1990
The International Temperature Scale of 1990 (ITS-90) published by the Consultative Committee for Thermometry (CCT) of the International Committee for Weights and Measures (CIPM) is an equipment calibration standard for making measurements on the Kelvin
Kelvin
and Celsius temperature scales. ITS–90 is an approximation of the thermodynamic temperature scale that facilitates the comparability and compatibility of temperature measurements internationally. It specifies fourteen calibration points ranging from 0.65±0 K to 1357.77±0 K (-272.50±0 °C to 1084.62±0 °C) and is subdivided into multiple temperature ranges which overlap in some instances
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ISO 518
A hot shoe is a mounting point on the top of a camera to attach a flash unit and other compatible accessories. It takes the form of an angled metal bracket surrounding a metal contact point which shorts an electrical connection between camera and accessory for standard, brand-independent flash synchronization. The hot shoe is a development of the standardised "accessory shoe", with no flash contacts, formerly fitted to cameras to hold accessories such as a rangefinder, or flash connected by a cable. The dimensions of the hot shoe are defined by the International Organization for Standardization in ISO 518:2006. Details such as trigger voltage are not standardised; electrical incompatibilities are still possible between brands.[citation needed]Contents1 Design 2 History and use 3 Voltages 4 Modern cold shoes and other devices 5 References 6 External linksDesign[edit] The hot shoe is shaped somewhat like an inverted, squared-off "U" of metal
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Physical Unit
A unit of measurement is a definite magnitude of a quantity, defined and adopted by convention or by law, that is used as a standard for measurement of the same kind of quantity.[1] Any other quantity of that kind can be expressed as a multiple of the unit of measurement. For example, a length is a physical quantity. The metre is a unit of length that represents a definite predetermined length. When we say 10 metres (or 10 m), we actually mean 10 times the definite predetermined length called "metre". Measurement
Measurement
is a process of determining how large or small a physical quantity is as compared to a basic reference quantity of the same kind. The definition, agreement, and practical use of units of measurement have played a crucial role in human endeavour from early ages up to the present
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Physical Quantity
A physical quantity is a physical property of a phenomenon, body, or substance, that can be quantified by measurement.[1] A physical quantity can be expressed as the combination of a magnitude expressed by a number – usually a real number – and a unit: n u textstyle nu where n textstyle n is the magnitude and u textstyle u is the unit. For example, 6973167492749999999♠1.6749275×10−27 kg (the mass of the neutron), or 7008299792458000000♠299792458 metres per second (the speed of light). The same physical quantity x textstyle x can be represented equivalently in many unit systems, i.e
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Thermodynamic Temperature
Thermodynamic temperature
Thermodynamic temperature
is the absolute measure of temperature and is one of the principal parameters of thermodynamics. Thermodynamic temperature
Thermodynamic temperature
is defined by the third law of thermodynamics in which the theoretically lowest temperature is the null or zero point. At this point, absolute zero, the particle constituents of matter have minimal motion and can become no colder.[1][2] In the quantum-mechanical description, matter at absolute zero is in its ground state, which is its state of lowest energy
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ISO 128
ISO 128
ISO 128
is an international standard (ISO), about the general principles of presentation in technical drawings, specifically the graphical representation of objects on technical drawings.[1]Contents1 Overview 2 Composition of ISO 128 3 Other ISO standards related to technical drawing 4 See also 5 ReferencesOverview[edit] Since 2003 the ISO 128
ISO 128
standard contains twelve parts, which were initiated between 1996 and 2003. It starts with a summary of the general rules for the execution and structure of technical drawings. Further it describes basic conventions for lines, views, cuts and sections, and different types of engineering drawings, such as those for mechanical engineering, architecture, civil engineering, and shipbuilding
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ISO 31-8
ISO 31-8 is the part of international standard ISO 31 that defines names and symbols for quantities and units related to physical chemistry and molecular physics.Contents1 Quantities and units 2 Notes 3 Normative annexes3.1 Annex A: Names and symbols of the chemical elements 3.2 Annex B: Symbols for chemical elements and nucleides 3.3 Annex C: pHQuantities and units[edit]Quantity Unit RemarksName Symbol Definition Name Symbolrelative atomic mass Ar Ratio of the average mass per atom of an element to 1/12 of the mass of an atom of the nuclide 12C one 1 Formerly called atomic/molecular weight. Example: Ar(Cl) = 35.453. Both quantities depend on the nuclidic composition.<
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ISO 31-9
ISO 31-9 gives name, symbol and definition for 51 quantities and units of atomic and nuclear physics. Where appropriate, conversion factors are also given
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