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IRAP RMS Suite
Roxar RMS is a reservoir characterization and modeling software suite. It is primarily designed for use in the oil and gas industry, helping engineers gather data from a wide variety of sources to efficiently build reliable reservoirs.Contents1 History 2 Versions2.1 RMS 6 2.2 RMS 72.2.1 New modules in RMS 72.3 RMS 8 2.4 RMS 9 2.5 RMS 2009 2.6 RMS 2010 2.7 RMS 2011 2.8 RMS 2012 2.9 RMS 2013 2.10 RMS 2013.1 2.11 RMS 10 2.12 RMS 10.13 See also 4 References 5 External linksHistory[edit]1987 - Geomatic begins distribution of the first version of the IRAP software. 1994 - IRAP becomes IRAP RMS, the industry’s first 3D modelling package. 1995 - Smedvig
Smedvig
Technologies, later known as Roxar AS, acquires Geomatic AS and ODIN Reservoir Software
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Windows XP
Windows XP
Windows XP
(codenamed Whistler) is a personal computer operating system that was produced by Microsoft
Microsoft
as part of the Windows NT
Windows NT
family of operating systems. It was released to manufacturing on August 24, 2001, and broadly released for retail sale on October 25, 2001. Development of Windows XP
Windows XP
began in the late 1990s as "Neptune", an operating system built on the Windows NT
Windows NT
kernel which was intended specifically for mainstream consumer use. An updated version of Windows 2000
Windows 2000
was also originally planned for the business market; however, in January 2000, both projects were shelved in favor of a single OS codenamed "Whistler", which would serve as a single OS platform for both consumer and business markets
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Emerson Electric
The Emerson Electric Company
Emerson Electric Company
(NYSE: EMR) is an American multinational corporation headquartered in Ferguson, Missouri, United States.[2][3][4] This Fortune 500
Fortune 500
company manufactures products and provides engineering services for a wide range of industrial, commercial, and consumer markets.[5][6] Emerson has approximately 103,500 employees and 205 manufacturing locations worldwide.[7]Contents1 History 2 Corporate governance 3 Business platforms 4 Environmental records 5 Corporate relationships5.1 Emerson's brands acquisitions 5.2 NBC
NBC
Heroes lawsuit6 References 7 External linksHistory[edit] Emerson was established in 1890 in St. Louis, Missouri
Missouri
as Emerson Electric Manufacturing Co. by Civil War Union veteran John Wesley Emerson to manufacture electric motors using a patent owned by the Scottish-born brothers Charles and Alexander Meston
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Special
Special
Special
or specials may refer to:Contents1 Music 2 Film and television 3 Other uses 4 See alsoMusic[edit] Special
Special
(album), a 1992 album by Vesta Williams "Special" (Garb
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International Standard Book Number
"ISBN" redirects here. For other uses, see ISBN (other).International Standard Book
Book
NumberA 13-digit ISBN, 978-3-16-148410-0, as represented by an EAN-13 bar codeAcronym ISBNIntroduced 1970; 48 years ago (1970)Managing organisation International ISBN AgencyNo. of digits 13 (formerly 10)Check digit Weighted sumExample 978-3-16-148410-0Website www.isbn-international.orgThe International Standard Book
Book
Number (ISBN) is a unique[a][b] numeric commercial book identifier. Publishers purchase ISBNs from an affiliate of the International ISBN Agency.[1] An ISBN is assigned to each edition and variation (except reprintings) of a book. For example, an e-book, a paperback and a hardcover edition of the same book would each have a different ISBN. The ISBN is 13 digits long if assigned on or after 1 January 2007, and 10 digits long if assigned before 2007
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Springer Science+Business Media
Springer Science+Business Media
Springer Science+Business Media
or Springer, part of Springer Nature since 2015, is a global publishing company that publishes books, e-books and peer-reviewed journals in science, humanities, technical and medical (STM) publishing.[1] Springer also hosts a number of scientific databases, including SpringerLink, Springer Protocols, and SpringerImages
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Python (programming Language)
Python is an interpreted high-level programming language for general-purpose programming. Created by Guido van Rossum
Guido van Rossum
and first released in 1991, Python has a design philosophy that emphasizes code readability, notably using significant whitespace. It provides constructs that enable clear programming on both small and large scales.[26] Python features a dynamic type system and automatic memory management. It supports multiple programming paradigms, including object-oriented, imperative, functional and procedural, and has a large and comprehensive standard library.[27] Python interpreters are available for many operating systems. CPython, the reference implementation of Python, is open source software[28] and has a community-based development model, as do nearly all of its variant implementations
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64-bit
In computer architecture, 6 4-bit
4-bit
computing is the use of processors that have datapath widths, integer size, and memory address widths of 64 bits (eight octets). Also, 6 4-bit
4-bit
computer architectures for central processing units (CPUs) and arithmetic logic units (ALUs) are those that are based on processor registers, address buses, or data buses of that size. From the software perspective, 6 4-bit
4-bit
computing means the use of code with 6 4-bit
4-bit
virtual memory addresses
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32-bit
In computer architecture, 32-bit
32-bit
integers, memory addresses, or other data units are those that are 32 bits (4 octets) wide. Also, 32-bit
32-bit
CPU and ALU architectures are those that are based on registers, address buses, or data buses of that size. 32-bit microcomputers are computers in which 32-bit
32-bit
microprocessors are the norm.Contents1 Range for storing integers 2 Technical history 3 Architectures 4 Applications 5 Images 6 File
File
formats 7 See also 8 References 9 External linksRange for storing integers[edit] A 32-bit
32-bit
register can store 232 different values. The range of integer values that can be stored in 32 bits depends on the integer representation used
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Seismic
Seismology
Seismology
( /saɪzˈmɒlədʒi/; from Ancient Greek
Ancient Greek
σεισμός (seismós) meaning "earthquake" and -λογία (-logía) meaning "study of") is the scientific study of earthquakes and the propagation of elastic waves through the Earth
Earth
or through other planet-like bodies. The field also includes studies of earthquake environmental effects such as tsunamis as well as diverse seismic sources such as volcanic, tectonic, oceanic, atmospheric, and artificial processes such as explosions. A related field that uses geology to infer information regarding past earthquakes is paleoseismology. A recording of earth motion as a function of time is called a seismogram
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Real-time Data
Real-time data (RTD) is information that is delivered immediately after collection. There is no delay in the timeliness of the information provided. Real-time data is often used for navigation or tracking.[1] Such data is usually processed using real-time computing although it can also be stored for later or off-line data analysis. Some uses of the term "real-time data" confuse it with the term dynamic data.[citation needed] The presence of real-time data is actually irrelevant to whether it is dynamic or static.Contents1 Real-time data in economics 2 Real-time data in real-time bidding 3 See also 4 References 5 External links Real-time data in economics[edit] Real-time economic data, and other official statistics, are often based on preliminary estimates, and therefore are frequently adjusted as better estimates become available. These later adjusted data are called "revised data"
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Correlation
In statistics, dependence or association is any statistical relationship, whether causal or not, between two random variables or bivariate data. Correlation is any of a broad class of statistical relationships involving dependence, though in common usage it most often refers to how close two variables are to having a linear relationship with each other. Familiar examples of dependent phenomena include the correlation between the physical statures of parents and their offspring, and the correlation between the demand for a limited supply product and its price. Correlations are useful because they can indicate a predictive relationship that can be exploited in practice. For example, an electrical utility may produce less power on a mild day based on the correlation between electricity demand and weather. In this example, there is a causal relationship, because extreme weather causes people to use more electricity for heating or cooling
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Oil Well
An oil well is a boring in the Earth
Earth
that is designed to bring petroleum oil hydrocarbons to the surface. Usually some natural gas is released along with the oil. A well that is designed to produce mainly or only gas may be termed a gas well.Contents1 History 2 Life of a well2.1 Planning 2.2 Drilling 2.3 Completion 2.4 Production 2.5 Abandonment3 Types of wells3.1 By produced fluid 3.2 By location 3.3 By purpose4 Cost 5 See also 6 References 7 External linksHistory[edit]Bottom Part of an Oil
Oil
Drilling
Drilling
Derrick in Brazoria County, Texas (Harry Walker Photograph, circa 1940)The earliest known oil wells were drilled in China in 347 CE. These wells had depths of up to about 240 metres (790 ft) and were drilled using bits attached to bamboo poles.[1] The oil was burned to evaporate brine and produce salt
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Stochastic
See also stochastic process.This article may require cleanup to meet's quality standards. No cleanup reason has been specified. Please help improve this article if you can. (September 2010) (Learn how and when to remove this template message)The word stochastic is an adjective in English that describes something that was randomly determined.[1] The word first appeared in English to describe a mathematical object called a stochastic process, but now in mathematics the terms stochastic process and random process are considered interchangeable.[2][3][4][5][6] The word, with its current definition meaning random, came from German, but it originally came from Greek στόχος (stokhos), meaning 'aim, guess'.[1] The term stochastic is used in many different fields, particularly where stochastic or random processes are used to represent systems or phenomena that seem to change in a random way
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Software Developer
A software developer is a person concerned with facets of the software development process, including the research, design, programming, and testing of computer software. Other job titles which are often used with similar meanings are programmer, software analyst, and software engineer. According to developer Eric Sink, the differences between system design, software development, and programming are more apparent. Already in the current market place there can be found a segregation between programmers and developers, being that one who implements is not the same as the one who designs the class structure or hierarchy. Even more so that developers become software architects or systems architects, those who design the multi-leveled architecture or component interactions of a large software system.[1] In a large company, there may be employees whose sole responsibility consists of only one of the phases above
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Smedvig
Smedvig ASA, ("Smedvig"), (OSE: SME, NYSE: SMVA) was a Norwegian offshore oil rig company headquartered in Stavanger until it was acquired (January 2006) by rig newcomer SeaDrill. At time of the merger Smedvig operated two semi submersibles, one drillship and one jack up rig in the Norwegian and British sector of the North Sea. A fleet of seven tender rigs were operated in South East Asia from the Singaporean subsidiary Smedvig Asia. As part of the merger, Smedvig's staff was transferred to Seadrill with Smedvig senior personnel assuming key positions in Seadrill (CEO, CFO etc.). Smedvig was delisted from the OSE and NYSE. Tanker mogul John Fredriksen is the major stake holder in SeaDrill. Seadrill is listed on the Oslo Stock Exchange. [1] History[edit] Smedvig started in 1915 as the shipping company Peder Smedvig Shipping Company by Peder Smedvig. Between 1917 and 1959 Smedvig was also in the canning industry
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