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Hydrops Fetalis
Hydrops fetalis
Hydrops fetalis
is a condition in the fetus characterized by an accumulation of fluid, or edema, in at least two fetal compartments.[1] By comparison, hydrops allantois or hydrops amnion is an accumulation of excessive fluid in the allantoic or amniotic space, respectively.[2]Contents1 Signs and symptoms 2 Causes2.1 Immune 2.2 Non-immune3 Diagnosis 4 Treatment 5 See also 6 References 7 External linksSigns and symptoms[edit] Locations can include:subcutaneous tissue/scalp pleura (pleural effusion) pericardium (pericardial effusion) abdomen (ascites)The edema is usually seen in the fetal subcutaneous tissue, sometimes leading to spontaneous abortion
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International Statistical Classification Of Diseases And Related Health Problems
The International Classification of Diseases (ICD) is the international "standard diagnostic tool for epidemiology, health management and clinical purposes". Its full official name is International Statistical Classification of Diseases and Related Health Problems.[1] The ICD is maintained by the World Health Organization
World Health Organization
(WHO), the directing and coordinating authority for health within the United Nations System.[2] The ICD is designed as a health care classification system, providing a system of diagnostic codes for classifying diseases, including nuanced classifications of a wide variety of signs, symptoms, abnormal findings, complaints, social circumstances, and external causes of injury or disease. This system is designed to map health conditions to corresponding generic categories together with specific variations, assigning for these a designated code, up to six characters long
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Cytomegalovirus
Cytomegalovirus
Cytomegalovirus
(CMV) (from the Greek cyto-, "cell", and megalo-, "large") is a genus of viruses in the order Herpesvirales, in the family Herpesviridae, in the subfamily Betaherpesvirinae. Humans and monkeys serve as natural hosts. There are currently eight species in this genus including the type species, human cytomegalovirus (HCMV, human herpesvirus 5, HHV-5), which is the species that infects humans. Diseases associated with HHV-5 include glandular fever, and pneumonia.[2][3] In the medical literature, most mentions of CMV without further specification refer implicitly to human CMV
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Tumor
Neoplasm
Neoplasm
is an abnormal growth of tissue which, if it forms a mass, is commonly referred to as a tumor.[1][2][3] This abnormal growth (neoplasia) usually (but not always) forms a mass.[4] ICD-10 classifies neoplasms into four main groups: benign neoplasms, in situ neoplasms, malignant neoplasms, and neoplasms of uncertain or unknown behavior.[5] Malignant neoplasms
Malignant neoplasms
are also simply known as cancers and are the focus of oncology. Prior to the abnormal growth of tissue, as neoplasia, cells often undergo an abnormal pattern of growth, such as metaplasia or dysplasia.[6] However, metaplasia or dysplasia does not always progress to neoplasia.[1] The word is from Ancient Greek
Ancient Greek
νέος- neo "new" and πλάσμα plasma "formation, creation".Contents1 Types1.1 Clonality 1.2 Neoplasia
Neoplasia
vs
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ICD-10
ICD-10 is the 10th revision of the International Statistical Classification of Diseases and Related Health Problems (ICD), a medical classification list by the World Health Organization
World Health Organization
(WHO). It contains codes for diseases, signs and symptoms, abnormal findings, complaints, social circumstances, and external causes of injury or diseases.[1] Work on ICD-10 began in 1983 and was completed in 1992.[1] The code set in the base classification allows for more than 14,400 different codes,[citation needed] and permits the tracking of many new diagnoses compared to ICD-9)
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Rho(D) Immune Globulin
Rho(D) immune globulin
Rho(D) immune globulin
is a medication used to prevent Rh isoimmunization in mothers who are Rh negative and to treat idiopathic thrombocytopenic purpura (ITP) in people who are Rh positive.[1] It is often given both during and following pregnancy.[1] It may also be used when
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Iron Deficiency Anemia
Iron-deficiency anemia
Iron-deficiency anemia
is anemia caused by a lack of iron.[3] Anemia is defined as a decrease in the number of red blood cells or the amount of hemoglobin in the blood.[8][3] When onset is slow, symptoms are often vague, including feeling tired, weakness, shortness of breath, or poor ability to exercise.[1] Anemia
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Paroxysmal Supraventricular Tachycardia
Paroxysmal supraventricular tachycardia
Paroxysmal supraventricular tachycardia
(PSVT) is a type of supraventricular tachycardia.[6] Often people have no symptoms.[1] Otherwise symptoms may include palpitations, feeling lightheaded, sweating, shortness of breath, and chest pain.[2] Episodes start and end suddenly.[3] The cause is not known.[3] Risk factors include alcohol, caffeine, nicotine, psychological stress, and
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Lysosomal Storage Disease
Lysosomal storage diseases (LSDs; /ˌlaɪsəˈsoʊməl/) are a group of about 50 rare inherited metabolic disorders that result from defects in lysosomal function.[1] Lysosomes are sacs of enzymes within cells that digest large molecules and pass the fragments on to other parts of the cell for recycling. This process requires several critical enzymes. If one of these enzymes is defective, because of a mutation, the large molecules accumulate within the cell, eventually killing it.[2] Lysosomal storage disorders are caused by lysosomal dysfunction usually as a consequence of deficiency of a single enzyme required for the metabolism of lipids, glycoproteins (sugar-containing proteins), or so-called mucopolysaccharides
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Mucopolysaccharidosis Type VII
Sly syndrome, also called mucopolysaccharidosis type VII (MPS 7), is an autosomal recessive lysosomal storage disease characterized by a deficiency of the enzyme β-glucuronidase, a lysosomal enzyme. Sly syndrome belongs to a group of disorders known as mucopolysaccharidoses, which are lysosomal storage diseases. In Sly syndrome, the deficiency in β-glucuronidase leads to the accumulation of certain complex carbohydrates (mucopolysaccharides) in many tissues and organs of the body. It was named after its discoverer William S. Sly, an American biochemist who has spent nearly his entire academic career at Saint Louis University.[1][2]Contents1 Signs and symptoms 2 Genetics 3 Diagnosis 4 Management 5 Prevalence 6 References 7 External linksSigns and symptoms[edit] The symptoms of Sly syndrome
Sly syndrome
are similar to those of Hurler syndrome (MPS I)
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Syphilis
Syphilis
Syphilis
is a sexually transmitted infection caused by the bacterium Treponema pallidum
Treponema pallidum
subspecies pallidum.[2] The signs and symptoms of syphilis vary depending in which of the four stages it presents (prim
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Spontaneous Abortion
Miscarriage, also known as spontaneous abortion and pregnancy loss, is the natural death of an embryo or fetus before it is able to survive independently.[1][3] Some use the cutoff of 20 weeks of gestation, after which fetal death is known as a stillbirth.[11] The most common symptom of a miscarriage is vaginal bleeding with or without pain.[1] Sadness, anxiety and guilt often occur afterwards.[2][12] Tissue and clot-like material may leave the uterus and pass through and out of the vagina.[13] When a woman keeps having miscarriages, infertility is present.[14] Risk factors for miscarriage include an older parent, previous miscarriage, exposure to tobacco smoke, obesity, diabetes, thyroid problems, and drug or alcohol use.[5][6] About 80% of miscarriages occur in the first 12 weeks of pregnancy (the first trimester).[1] The underlying cause in about half of cases involves chromosomal abnormalities.[4][1] Diagnosis of a miscarriage may involve checking to see if the cervix is open or cl
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Niemann-Pick Disease
Niemann–Pick disease
Niemann–Pick disease
(/niːmənˈpɪk/ nee-mən-PIK)[1] is a group of inherited, severe metabolic disorders in which sphingomyelin accumulates in lysosomes in cells
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Gaucher Disease
Gaucher's disease
Gaucher's disease
or Gaucher disease (/ɡoʊˈʃeɪ/) (GD) is a genetic disorder in which glucocerebroside (a sphingolipid, also known as glucosylceramide) accumulates in cells and certain organs. The disorder is characterized by bruising, fatigue, anemia, low blood platelet count and enlargement of the liver and spleen, and is caused by a hereditary deficiency of the enzyme glucocerebrosidase (also known as glucosylceramidase), which acts on glucocerebroside. When the enzyme is defective, glucocerebroside accumulates, particularly in white blood cells and especially in macrophages (mononuclear leukocytes)
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Turner Syndrome
Turner syndrome
Turner syndrome
(TS), also known as 45,X or 45,X0, is a condition in which a female is partly or completely missing an X chromosome.[2] Signs and symptoms vary among those affected.[1] Often, a short and webbed neck, low-set ears, low hairline at the back of the neck, short stature, and swollen hands and feet are seen at birth.[1] Typically, they develop menstrual periods and breasts only with hormone treatment, and are unable to have children without reproductive technology.[1]
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Monochorionic Twins
Monochorionic twins
Monochorionic twins
are monozygotic (identical) twins that share the same placenta. If the placenta is shared by more than two twins (see multiple birth), these are monochorionic multiples. Monochorionic twins occur in 0.3% of all pregnancies.[1] 75% of monozygotic twin pregnancies are monochorionic; the remaining 25% are dichorionic diamniotic.[2] If the placenta divides, this takes place after the third day after fertilization.[2]Contents1 Amniocity and zygosity 2 Diagnosis 3 Complications 4 See also 5 ReferencesAmniocity and zygosity[edit] Abdominal ultrasonography
Abdominal ultrasonography
of monoamniotic twins at a gestational age of 15 weeks. There is no sign of any membrane between the fetuses
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