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Hydro-Québec
Hydro-Québec
Hydro-Québec
is a public utility that manages the generation, transmission and distribution of electricity in Quebec. It was formed by the Government of Quebec
Quebec
in 1944 from the expropriation of private firms. This was followed by massive investment in hydro-electric projects like Churchill Falls and the James Bay
James Bay
Project. Today, with 63 hydroelectric power stations, the combined output capacity is 36,912 megawatts. Extra power is exported from the province and Hydro-Québec
Hydro-Québec
supplies 10 per cent of New England's power requirements.[3] Hydro-Québec
Hydro-Québec
is a state-owned enterprise based in Montreal. In 2015, it paid CAD$2.36 billion in dividends to its sole shareholder, the Government of Québec
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List Of Business Entities
A business entity is an entity that is formed and administered as per corporate law in order to engage in business activities, charitable work, or other activities allowable. Most often, business entities are formed to sell a product or a service. There are many types of business entities defined in the legal systems of various countries. These include corporations, cooperatives, partnerships, sole traders, limited liability company and other specifically permitted and labelled types of entities. The specific rules vary by country and by state or province
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Public Utility
A public utility (usually just utility) is an organization that maintains the infrastructure for a public service (often also providing a service using that infrastructure). Public utilities are subject to forms of public control and regulation ranging from local community-based groups to statewide government monopolies. The term utilities can also refer to the set of services provided by these organizations consumed by the public: electricity, natural gas, water, sewage, telephone, and transportation
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Atomic Energy Of Canada Limited
Atomic Energy of Canada Limited
Atomic Energy of Canada Limited
(AECL) is a Canadian federal Crown corporation and Canada's largest nuclear science and technology laboratory. AECL developed the CANDU
CANDU
reactor technology starting in the 1950s, and in October 2011 licensed this technology to Candu Energy (a wholly owned subsidiary of SNC-Lavalin). Today AECL develops peaceful and innovative applications from nuclear technology through expertise in physics, metallurgy, chemistry, biology and engineering. AECL's activities range from research and development, design and engineering to specialized technology development, waste management and decommissioning
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Jean-Lesage Generating Station
The Jean-Lesage generating station, (French: Centrale Jean-Lesage) formerly known as Manic-2, is a dam located 22 km from Baie-Comeau
Baie-Comeau
built on Manicouagan River
Manicouagan River
in Quebec, Canada. It was constructed between 1961 and 1967. On June 22, 2010, the dam and the generating station were renamed in honour of Jean Lesage, who was premier of Quebec
Quebec
during the construction of the complex.[1]Contents1 Dam 2 Construction and commissioning 3 Tourism 4 See also 5 References 6 External linksDam[edit] Jean-Lesage is a gravity dam "hollow type" with a spillway made of concrete. The reservoir starts at the base of Manic-3. The dam is considered run-of-the-river and is fitted with eight Francis turbines, with a total capacity of 1,145 megawatts (1,535,000 hp).[2][3] Construction and commissioning[edit] Construction started on October 24, 1961
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Grande Noirceur
The Grande Noirceur (French pronunciation: ​[ɡʀɑ̃d nwaʀsœ:ʀ], English, Great Darkness) is a name that refers to the conservative policies undertaken by the government of Quebec
Quebec
Premier Maurice Duplessis
Maurice Duplessis
from 1936 to 1939 and from 1944 to 1959.Contents1 Rural areas 2 Support from the Church 3 Anti-communism 4 Anti-unionism 5 Labour strikes 6 Roncarelli v. Duplessis 7 Patronage and corruption 8 Provincial autonomy and nationalism 9 ReferencesRural areas[edit] Duplessis favoured rural areas over city development and introduced various agricultural credits during his first term. He also was noted for meagre investment in social services
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Maurice Duplessis
Maurice Le Noblet Duplessis (French pronunciation: ​[d͡zyplɛsi]; 20 April 1890 – 7 September 1959) served as the 16th Premier of the Canadian province of Quebec from 1936 to 1939 and 1944 to 1959. He rose to power after uniting his Conservative party and the breakaway Action liberale nationale progressive faction of the Liberal party of Premier Louis-Alexandre Taschereau, to form a new conservative party, the Union Nationale.[1] His era later became known as La Grande Noirceur ("The Great Darkness"). During the time, the Liberal opposition was unsuccessful in challenging Duplessis' power. Duplessis championed rural areas, provincial rights, economic development, strong investment in Catholic education and anti-Communism, and opposed the trade unions.Contents1 Early life 2 Political career 3 Policies 4 Roncarelli v
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Rural Electrification
Rural electrification
Rural electrification
is the process of bringing electrical power to rural and remote areas. Electricity is used not only for lighting and household purposes, but it also allows for mechanization of many farming operations, such as well-pumping, threshing, milking, and silo filling. In areas facing labor shortages, this allows for greater productivity at reduced cost. Electrification
Electrification
began in cities and towns and gradually extended to rural areas. An inherent challenge of extending electrical grids into the countryside is that doing so is expensive, but amortizing its capital cost well enough to sufficiently reduce the unit cost of each hook-up is harder to do in lightly populated areas (yielding higher per capita share of the expense)
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Shareholder
A shareholder or stockholder is an individual or institution (including a corporation) that legally owns one or more shares of stock in a public or private corporation. Shareholders may be referred to as members of a corporation. Legally, a person is not a shareholder in a corporation until his or her name and other details are entered in the register of shareholders.[1] Shareholders of a corporation are legally separate from the corporation itself. They are generally not liable for the debts of the corporation; and the shareholders' liability for company debts are said to be limited to the unpaid share price, unless if a shareholder has offered guarantees. Description[edit] Shareholders are granted special privileges depending on the class of stock
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Crown Corporation
A state-owned enterprise (SOE) is a business enterprise where the state has significant control through full, majority, or significant minority ownership.[1] Defining characteristics of SOEs are their distinct legal form and operation in commercial affairs and activities. While they may also have public policy objectives (e.g., a state railway company may aim to make transportation more accessible), SOEs should be differentiated from government agencies or state entities established to pursue purely nonfinancial objectives.[2]Contents1 Terminology 2 Sectors 3 Effects 4 SOEs around the world4.1 Europe 4.2 France 4.3 Middle East5 See also 6 References6.1 Citations 6.2 Sources7 Further readingTerminology[edit] The terminology around the term state-owned enterprise is murky
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State-owned Enterprise
A state-owned enterprise (SOE) is a business enterprise where the state has significant control through full, majority, or significant minority ownership.[1] Defining characteristics of SOEs are their distinct legal form and operation in commercial affairs and activities. While they may also have public policy objectives (e.g., a state railway company may aim to make transportation more accessible), SOEs should be differentiated from government agencies or state entities established to pursue purely nonfinancial objectives.[2]Contents1 Terminology 2 Sectors 3 Effects 4 SOEs around the world4.1 Europe 4.2 Middle East5 See also 6 References6.1 Citations 6.2 Sources7 Further readingTerminology[edit] The terminology around the term state-owned enterprise is murky
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New England
New England
New England
is a geographical region comprising six states of the northeastern United States: Maine, Vermont, New Hampshire, Massachusetts, Rhode Island, and Connecticut.[a] It is bordered by the state of New York to the west and by the Canadian provinces of New Brunswick and Quebec
Quebec
to the northeast and north, respectively. The Atlantic Ocean
Atlantic Ocean
is to the east and southeast, and Long Island Sound
Long Island Sound
is to the south. Boston
Boston
is New England's largest city as well as the capital of Massachusetts
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Power Station
A power station, also referred to as a power plant or powerhouse and sometimes generating station or generating plant, is an industrial facility for the generation of electric power. Most power stations contain one or more generators, a rotating machine that converts mechanical power into electrical power. The relative motion between a magnetic field and a conductor creates an electrical current. The energy source harnessed to turn the generator varies widely. Most power stations in the world burn fossil fuels such as coal, oil, and natural gas to generate electricity
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Hydroelectricity
Hydroelectricity
Hydroelectricity
is electricity produced from hydropower. In 2015 hydropower generated 16.6% of the world's total electricity and 70% of all renewable electricity,[1] and was expected to increase about 3.1% each year for the next 25 years. Hydropower
Hydropower
is produced in 150 countries, with the Asia-Pacific
Asia-Pacific
region generating 33 percent of global hydropower in 2013. China
China
is the largest hydroelectricity producer, with 920 TWh
TWh
of production in 2013, representing 16.9 percent of domestic electricity use. The cost of hydroelectricity is relatively low, making it a competitive source of renewable electricity. The hydro station consumes no water, unlike coal or gas plants. The average cost of electricity from a hydro station larger than 10 megawatts is 3 to 5 U.S
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Electricity
Electricity
Electricity
is the set of physical phenomena associated with the presence and motion of electric charge. Although initially considered a phenomenon separate from magnetism, since the development of Maxwell's equations, both are recognized as part of a single phenomenon: electromagnetism. Various common phenomena are related to electricity, including lightning, static electricity, electric heating, electric discharges and many others. The presence of an electric charge, which can be either positive or negative, produces an electric field. The movement of electric charges is an electric current and produces a magnetic field. When a charge is placed in a location with a non-zero electric field, a force will act on it. The magnitude of this force is given by Coulomb's law. Thus, if that charge were to move, the electric field would be doing work on the electric charge
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Electricity Generation
Electricity generation
Electricity generation
is the process of generating electric power from sources of primary energy. For electric utilities in the electric power industry, it is the first stage in the delivery of electricity to end users, the other stages being transmission, distribution, energy storage and recovery, using pumped-storage methods. A characteristic of electricity is that it is not a primary energy freely present in nature in remarkable amounts and it must be produced. Production is carried out in power plants. Electricity is most often generated at a power station by electromechanical generators, primarily driven by heat engines fueled by combustion or nuclear fission but also by other means such as the kinetic energy of flowing water and wind
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