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Hyōgo Prefecture
Hyōgo Prefecture
Hyōgo Prefecture
(兵庫県, Hyōgo-ken) is a prefecture of Japan located in the Kansai region
Kansai region
on
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Provinces Of Japan
Provinces of Japan
Japan
(令制国, Ryōseikoku) were administrative divisions before the modern prefecture system was established, when the islands of Japan
Japan
were divided into tens of kuni (国, countries), usually known in English as provinces.[1] Each province was divided into gun (郡, districts, earlier called kōri).Contents1 History1.1 Edo period 1.2 Meiji period 1.3 Today2 See also 3 Notes 4 References 5 External linksHistory[edit] The provinces were originally established by Ritsuryō
Ritsuryō
as both administrative units and geographic regions. In the late Muromachi period, however, their function was gradually supplanted by the domains of the sengoku daimyō. Under the rule of Toyotomi Hideyoshi, the provinces were supplemented as primary local administrative units
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List Of Japanese Prefectures By Area
This is a list of Japanese prefectures by area. For details of administrative divisions of Japan, see Prefectures of Japan.Contents1 Prefectures of Japan
Prefectures of Japan
ranked by area as of October 1, 2015 2 Prefectures of Japan
Prefectures of Japan
ranked by area as of January 1, 1883 3 See also 4 External links 5 References and notes Prefectures of Japan
Prefectures of Japan
ranked by area as of October 1, 2015[edit] Figures here are according to the official estimates of Japan.[1] Ranks are given by estimated areas
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Moment Magnitude Scale
The moment magnitude scale (MMS; denoted as Mw or M) is used by seismologists to measure the size of earthquakes.[1] The scale was developed in the 1970s to succeed the 1930s-era Richter magnitude scale (ML). Even though the formulas are different, the new scale retains a continuum of magnitude values similar to that defined by the older one. Under suitable assumptions, as with the Richter magnitude scale, an increase of one step on this logarithmic scale corresponds to a 101.5 (about 32) times increase in the amount of energy released, and an increase of two steps corresponds to a 103 (1,000) times increase in energy
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Taira No Kiyomori
Taira
Taira
no Kiyomori (平 清盛, 1118 – March 20, 1181) was a military leader of the late Heian period
Heian period
of Japan. He established the first samurai-dominated administrative government in the history of Japan.Contents1 Early life 2 Family 3 Career 4 Cultural references 5 Honours 6 See also 7 ReferencesEarly life[edit] Kiyomori was born at Ise Province
Ise Province
in 1118 as the first son of Taira
Taira
no Tadamori. His mother Gion no Nyōgo was a palace servant based from The Tale of the Heike. Kiyomori was the son of Emperor Shirakawa
Emperor Shirakawa
with Gion no Nyogo who was given to Tadamori. Family[edit]Father: Taira
Taira
no Tadamori Mother: Gion no Nyogo (d
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Heian Period
The Heian period
Heian period
(平安時代, Heian jidai) is the last division of classical Japanese history, running from 794 to 1185.[1] The period is named after the capital city of Heian-kyō, or modern Kyōto. It is the period in Japanese history when Buddhism, Taoism
Taoism
and other Chinese influences were at their height. The Heian period
Heian period
is also considered the peak of the Japanese imperial court and noted for its art, especially poetry and literature. Although the Imperial House of Japan had power on the surface, the real power was in the hands of the Fujiwara clan, a powerful aristocratic family who had intermarried with the imperial family
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World Heritage Site
A World Heritage Site
World Heritage Site
is a landmark or area which is selected by the United Nations
United Nations
Educational, Scientific and Cultural Organization (UNESCO) as having cultural, historical, scientific or other form of significance, and is legally protected by international treaties. The sites are judged important to the collective interests of humanity. To be selected, a World Heritage Site
World Heritage Site
must be an already classified landmark, unique in some respect as a geographically and historically identifiable place having special cultural or physical significance (such as an ancient ruin or historical structure, building, city, complex, desert, forest, island, lake, monument, mountain, or wilderness area)
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UNESCO
The United Nations
United Nations
Educational, Scientific and Cultural Organisation (UNESCO;[2] French: Organisation des Nations unies pour l'éducation, la science et la culture) is a specialized agency of the United Nations (UN) based in Paris
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Camphor
Camphor
Camphor
(/ˈkæmfər/) is a waxy, flammable, white or transparent solid with a strong aroma.[5] It is a terpenoid with the chemical formula C10H16O. It is found in the wood of the camphor laurel (Cinnamomum camphora), a large evergreen tree found in Asia (particularly in Sumatra
Sumatra
and Borneo
Borneo
islands, Indonesia) and also of the unrelated kapur tree, a tall timber tree from the same region. It also occurs in some other related trees in the laurel family, notably Ocotea usambarensis. The oil in rosemary leaves (Rosmarinus officinalis), in the mint family, contains 10 to 20% camphor,[6] while camphorweed (Heterotheca) only contains some 5%.[7] Camphor
Camphor
can also be synthetically produced from oil of turpentine. It is used for its scent, as an ingredient in cooking (mainly in India), as an embalming fluid, for medicinal purposes, and in religious ceremonies
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Municipalities Of Japan
Japan
Japan
has three levels of government: national, prefectural, and municipal. The nation is divided into 47 prefectures. Each prefecture consists of numerous municipalities, with 1,719 in total (January 2013 figures) [1]. There are four types of municipalities in Japan: cities, towns, villages and special wards (the ku of Tokyo). In Japanese, this system is known as shikuchōson (市区町村), where each kanji in the word represents one of the four types of municipalities. Some designated cities also have further administrative subdivisions, also known as wards. But, unlike the Special
Special
wards of Tokyo, these wards are not municipalities.Contents1 Status 2 Examples 3 Non-municipality 4 See also 5 External linksStatus[edit] The status of a municipality, if it is a village, town or city, is decided by the prefectural government
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Districts Of Japan
The district (郡, gun) is today a geographical and statistical unit comprising one or several rural municipalities in Japan. It was used as an administrative unit in Japan
Japan
in antiquity and between 1878[1] and 1921[2] and was roughly equivalent to the county of the United States, ranking at the level below prefecture and above town or village, same as city.[3]Contents1 History 2 Districts today 3 Confusing cases in Hokkaidō 4 See also 5 References 6 Bibliography 7 External linksHistory[edit] The district was initially called kōri and has ancient roots in Japan. Although the Nihon Shoki
Nihon Shoki
says they were established during the Taika Reforms, kōri was originally written 評.[4] It was not until the Taihō Code
Taihō Code
that kōri came to be written 郡
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ISO 3166
ISO 3166 is a standard published by the International Organization for Standardization
Standardization
(ISO) that defines codes for the names of countries, dependent territories, special areas of geographical interest, and their principal subdivisions (e.g., provinces or states). The official name of the standard is Codes for the representation of names of countries and their subdivisions.Contents1 Parts 2 Editions 3 ISO 3166 Maintenance Agency3.1 Members4 See also 5 References 6 External linksParts[edit] It consists of three parts:[1]ISO 3166-1, Codes for the representation of names of countries and their subdivisions – Part 1: Country
Country
codes, defines codes for the names of countries, dependent territories, and special areas of geographical interest
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Oriental White Stork
The Oriental stork (Ciconia boyciana) is a large, white bird with black wing feathers in the stork family Ciconiidae. It is closely related to and resembles the European white stork (C. ciconia), of which it was formerly often treated as a subspecies. It is typically larger than the white stork, at 100–129 cm (39.5–51 in) long, 110–150 cm (43–59 in) tall, a weight of 2.8–5.9 kg (6.2–13.0 lb) and a wingspan of 2.22 m (7.3 ft).[2][3] Unlike its more widespread cousin, the Oriental stork has red skin around its eye, with a whitish iris and black bill. Both sexes are similar. The female is slightly smaller than male. The young are white with orange bills. At one time, the Oriental stork could be found in Japan, China, Korea and Russia. It is now extinct in Japan and the Korean peninsula. However, in May 2007 a hatchling was reported in Japan for the first time in 40 years in the wild
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Sea Of Japan
The Sea of Japan
Japan
(see below for other names) is a marginal sea between the Japanese archipelago, Sakhalin, the Korean Peninsula
Korean Peninsula
and Russia. The Japanese archipelago
Japanese archipelago
separates the sea from the Pacific Ocean. It is bordered by Japan, Korea
Korea
(North and South) and Russia. Like the Mediterranean Sea, it has almost no tides due to its nearly complete enclosure from the Pacific Ocean.[1] This isolation also reflects in the fauna species and in the water salinity, which is lower than in the ocean. The sea has no large islands, bays or capes. Its water balance is mostly determined by the inflow and outflow through the straits connecting it to the neighboring seas and Pacific Ocean
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List Of Islands Of Japan
The four main islands of Japan
Japan
are:Hokkaido[1] Honshu,[2] the largest island, on which the capital, Tokyo, is located. Shikoku[2] Kyushu[3] Japan
Japan
also has over 4,000 smaller islands, of which over 430 are inhabited.[4]Contents1 List of smaller islands of
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Japanese Language
Japanese (日本語, Nihongo, [ɲihoŋɡo] or [ɲihoŋŋo] ( listen)) is an East Asian language spoken by about 126 million people, primarily in Japan, where it is the national language. It is a member of the Japonic (or Japanese-Ryukyuan) language family, and its relation to other languages, such as Korean, is debated. Japanese has been grouped with language families such as Ainu, Austroasiatic, and the now-discredited Altaic, but none of these proposals has gained widespread acceptance. Little is known of the language's prehistory, or when it first appeared in Japan. Chinese documents from the 3rd century recorded a few Japanese words, but substantial texts did not appear until the 8th century. During the Heian period
Heian period
(794–1185), Chinese had considerable influence on the vocabulary and phonology of Old Japanese
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