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Hwicce
Hwicce
Hwicce
(Old English: /ʍi:kt͡ʃe/ [hw-eek-chay]) was a tribal kingdom in Anglo-Saxon England. According to the Anglo-Saxon Chronicle, the kingdom was established in 577, after the Battle of Deorham. After 628, the kingdom became a client or sub-kingdom of Mercia
Mercia
as a result of the Battle of Cirencester. The Tribal Hidage
Tribal Hidage
assessed Hwicce
Hwicce
at 7000 hides, which would give it a similar sized economy to the kingdoms of Essex and Sussex. The exact boundaries of the kingdom remain uncertain, though it is likely that they coincided with those of the old Diocese of Worcester, founded in 679–80, the early bishops of which bore the title Episcopus Hwicciorum
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Augustine Of Canterbury
Augustine of Canterbury
Canterbury
(born first third of the 6th century – died probably 26 May 604) was a Catholic
Catholic
Benedictine monk who became the first Archbishop of Canterbury
Archbishop of Canterbury
in the year 597. He is considered the "Apostle to the English" and a founder of the Catholic
Catholic
Church in England.[3] Augustine was the prior of a monastery in Rome
Rome
when Pope Gregory the Great chose him in 595 to lead a mission, usually known as the Gregorian mission, to Britain to Christianize King Æthelberht and his Kingdom of Kent
Kent
from Anglo-Saxon paganism. Kent
Kent
was probably chosen because Æthelberht had married a Christian princess, Bertha, daughter of Charibert I
Charibert I
the King of Paris, who was expected to exert some influence over her husband
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Wichenford
Wichenford is a village and civil parish (with Kenswick) in the Malvern Hills District in the county of Worcestershire, England. It lies 6 miles to the north-west of the city of Worcester. Following the Poor Law Amendment Act 1834 Wichenford Parish ceased to be responsible for maintaining the poor in its parish. This responsibility was transferred to Martley Poor Law Union.[1]Contents1 Church 2 No Shops 3 Open Gardens and Village Fete 4 Millennium Green 5 Village Hall 6 ReferencesChurch[edit] A church or chapel has existed at Wichenford from early times with mention of a chapel in Wichenford, which was attached to the church of St. Helen, Worcester around 1234. Parts of the present church of St. Lawrence date from about 1320.[2] No Shops[edit] Until the mid-1990s Wichenford had both a village shop with Post Office and a village bakery, both now closed down. The two shops were situated at opposite sides of the village green, in the centre of the village
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Staffordshire
Staffordshire
Staffordshire
(/ˈstæfərdʃɪər/ or /ˈstæfərdʃər/;[2] abbreviated Staffs) is a landlocked county in the West Midlands of England. It adjoins Cheshire
Cheshire
to the north west, Derbyshire
Derbyshire
and Leicestershire
Leicestershire
to the east, Warwickshire
Warwickshire
to the south east, West Midlands and Worcestershire
Worcestershire
to the south, and Shropshire
Shropshire
to the west. Stone railway station
Stone railway station
in Stone.The largest city in Staffordshire
Staffordshire
is Stoke-on-Trent, which is administered separately from the rest of the county as an independent unitary authority. Lichfield
Lichfield
also has city status, although this is a considerably smaller cathedral city
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Shropshire
Shropshire
Shropshire
(/ˈʃrɒpʃər/ SHROP-shər or /ˈʃrɒpʃɪər/ SHROP-sheer; alternatively Salop;[citation needed] abbreviated, in print only, Shrops; demonym Salopian /səˈloʊpiən/ sə-LOH-pee-ən)[3] is a county in the West Midlands of England, bordering Wales
Wales
to the west, Cheshire
Cheshire
to the north, Staffordshire
Staffordshire
to the east, and Worcestershire
Worcestershire
and Herefordshire
Herefordshire
to the south. Shropshire Council
Shropshire Council
was created in 2009, a unitary authority taking over from the previous county council and five district councils
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Herefordshire
Herefordshire
Herefordshire
(/ˈhɛrɪfərdʃər/) is a county in the West Midlands of England, governed by Herefordshire
Herefordshire
Council. It borders Shropshire to the north, Worcestershire
Worcestershire
to the east, Gloucestershire
Gloucestershire
to the south-east, and the Welsh counties of Monmouthshire
Monmouthshire
and Powys
Powys
to the west. Hereford
Hereford
is a cathedral city and is the county town; with a population of approximately 55,800 inhabitants it is also the largest settlement. The county is one of the most rural and sparsely populated in England, with a population density of 82/km² (212/sq mi)
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Eilert Ekwall
Bror Oscar Eilert Ekwall
Eilert Ekwall
(born 8 January 1877 in Vallsjö, Jönköpings län, Sweden, died 23 November 1964 in Lund), known as Eilert Ekwall, was Professor of English at Lund
Lund
University, Sweden, from 1909 to 1942, and one of the outstanding scholars of the English language of the first half of the 20th century
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Warwickshire
Warwickshire
Warwickshire
(/ˈwɒrɪkʃər, -ʃɪər/ ( listen); abbreviated Warks) is a landlocked county in the West Midlands of England. The county town is Warwick, although the largest town is Nuneaton. The county is famous for being the birthplace of William Shakespeare.[2] The county is divided into five districts of North Warwickshire, Nuneaton
Nuneaton
and Bedworth, Rugby, Warwick
Warwick
and Stratford-on-Avon. The current county boundaries were set in 1974 by the Local Government Act 1972
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Forest Of Dean
The Forest of Dean
Forest of Dean
is a geographical, historical and cultural region in the western part of the county of Gloucestershire, England. It forms a roughly triangular plateau bounded by the River Wye
River Wye
to the west and northwest, Herefordshire
Herefordshire
to the north, the River Severn
River Severn
to the south, and the City of Gloucester
Gloucester
to the east. The area is characterised by more than 110 square kilometres (42 sq mi) of mixed woodland, one of the surviving ancient woodlands in England. A large area was reserved for royal hunting before 1066, and remained as the second largest crown forest in England, the largest being New Forest
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Gloucestershire
Gloucestershire
Gloucestershire
(/ˈɡlɒstərʃər/ ( listen), /-ʃɪər/ ( listen); formerly abbreviated as Gloucs. in print but now often as Glos.) is a county in South West England
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Romano-British Culture
Romano-British culture
Romano-British culture
is the culture that arose in Britain under the Roman Empire
Roman Empire
following the Roman conquest in AD 43 and the creation of the province of Britannia. It arose as a fusion of the imported Roman culture with that of the indigenous Britons, a people of Celtic language and custom
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Holy Grail
The Holy Grail
Grail
is a vessel that serves as an important motif in Arthurian
Arthurian
literature. Different traditions describe it as a cup, dish or stone with miraculous powers that provide happiness, eternal youth or sustenance in infinite abundance
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Oxfordshire
Oxfordshire
Oxfordshire
(/ˈɒksfərdʃər/ or /-ʃɪər/; often abbreviated Oxon from Oxonium, the Latin name of the city and county of Oxford) is a county in England
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Hide (unit)
The hide was an English unit of land measurement originally intended to represent the amount of land sufficient to support a household. It was traditionally taken to be 120 acres (49 hectares), but was in fact a measure of value and tax assessment, including obligations for food-rent (feorm), maintenance and repair of bridges and fortifications, manpower for the army (fyrd), and (eventually) the geld land tax. The hide's method of calculation is now obscure: different properties with the same hidage could vary greatly in extent even in the same county. Following the Norman Conquest of England, the hidage assessments were recorded in the Domesday Book
Domesday Book
and there was a tendency for land producing £1 of income per year to be assessed at 1 hide. The Norman kings continued to use the unit for their tax assessments until the end of the 12th century. The hide was divided into 4 yardlands or virgates
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Malvern Hills
The Malvern Hills
Malvern Hills
are a range of hills in the English counties of Worcestershire, Herefordshire
Herefordshire
and a small area of northern Gloucestershire, dominating the surrounding countryside and the towns and villages of the district of Malvern
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Ancient Rome
In historiography, ancient Rome
Rome
is Roman civilization from the founding of the city of Rome
Rome
in the 8th century BC to the collapse of the Western Roman Empire
Roman Empire
in the 5th century AD, encompassing the Roman Kingdom, Roman Republic
Roman Republic
and Roman Empire
Roman Empire
until the fall of the western empire.[1] The term is sometimes used to just refer to the kingdom and republic periods, excluding the subsequent empire.[2] The civilization began as an Italic settlement in the Italian peninsula, dating from the 8th century BC, that grew into the city of Rome
Rome
and which subsequently gave its name to the empire over which it ruled and to the widespread civilisation the empire developed
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