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Husi Chun
Husi Chun (斛斯椿) (495–537), courtesy name Fashou (法壽), formally Prince Wenxuan of Changshan (常山文宣王), was a general and official of the Chinese/ Xianbei
Xianbei
state Northern Wei
Northern Wei
and Northern Wei's branch successor state Western Wei.[1]Contents1 Early career 2 Involvement in the destruction of the Erzhus 3 Under Emperors Xiaowu and Wen 4 ReferencesEarly career[edit] Husi Chun was ethnically Xianbei, and his ancestors were tribal chiefs under Northern Wei's predecessor state Dai. During the reign of Emperor Xiaoming, Husi Chun's father Husi Zu (斛斯足) was one of the directors of husbandry—a mid-low level office in the imperial administration. At that time, Northern Wei
Northern Wei
was greatly affected by agrarian rebellions, and Husi Chun decided to take his household to follow the general Erzhu Rong
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Courtesy Name
A courtesy name (Chinese: 字, zi), also known as a style name,[1] is a name bestowed upon one at adulthood in addition to one's given name.[2] This practice is a tradition in East Asian cultures, including China, Japan, Korea
Korea
and Vietnam.[3] Formerly in China, the zi would replace a male's given name when he turned twenty, as a symbol of adulthood and respect.[citation needed] It could be given either by the parents or by the first personal teacher on the first day of family school. Females might substitute their given name for a zi upon marriage
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Jiangsu
Jiangsu
Jiangsu
( listen (help·info)), formerly romanized as Kiangsu, is an eastern-central coastal province of the People's Republic of China. It is one of the leading provinces in finance, education, technology and tourism, with its capital in Nanjing. Jiangsu
Jiangsu
is the third smallest, but the fifth most populous and the most densely populated of the 23 provinces of the People's Republic of China. Jiangsu
Jiangsu
has the highest GDP per capita of Chinese provinces and second-highest GDP of Chinese provinces, after Guangdong.[4] Jiangsu borders Shandong
Shandong
in the north, Anhui
Anhui
to the west, and Zhejiang
Zhejiang
and Shanghai
Shanghai
to the south
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Special
Special
Special
or specials may refer to:Contents1 Music 2 Film and television 3 Other uses 4 See alsoMusic[edit] Special
Special
(album), a 1992
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Emperor Wen Of Western Wei
Emperor Wen of Western Wei
Western Wei
((西)魏文帝) (507–551), personal name Yuan Baoju (元寶炬), was an emperor of Western Wei—a branch successor state to Northern Wei. In 534, Yuan Baoju, then the Prince of Nanyang, followed his cousin Emperor Xiaowu in fleeing from the capital Luoyang
Luoyang
to Chang'an, after a fallout between Emperor Xiaowu and the paramount general Gao Huan
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Incest
Incest
Incest
is sexual activity between family members or close relatives.[1][2] This typically includes sexual activity between people in a consanguineous relationship (blood relations), and sometimes those related by affinity, stepfamily, those related by adoption or marriage, or members of the same clan or lineage. The incest taboo is and has been one of the most widespread of all cultural taboos, both in present and in many past societies.[3] Most modern societies have laws regarding incest or social restrictions on closely consanguineous marriages.[3] In societies w
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Eastern Wei
The Eastern Wei
Eastern Wei
(/weɪ/;[4] simplified Chinese: 东魏; traditional Chinese: 東魏; pinyin: Dōng Wèi) followed the disintegration of the Northern Wei, and ruled northern China
China
from 534 to 550. As with Northern Wei, the ruling family of Eastern Wei
Eastern Wei
were members of the Tuoba
Tuoba
clan of the Xianbei. In 534 Gao Huan, the potentate of the eastern half of what was Northern Wei
Northern Wei
territory following the disintegration of the Northern Wei dynasty installed Yuan Shanjian a descendant of the Northern Wei as ruler of Eastern Wei. Yuan Shanjian was a puppet ruler as the real power lay in the hands of Gao Huan
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Emperor Xiaojing Of Eastern Wei
Emperor Xiaojing of Eastern Wei
Eastern Wei
((東)魏孝靜帝) (524–552), personal name Yuan Shanjian (元善見), was the only emperor of the Eastern Wei
Eastern Wei
– a branch successor state to Northern Wei. In 524, Northern Wei's paramount general Gao Huan, after Emperor Xiaowu had fled the capital Luoyang
Luoyang
to reestablish the imperial government at Chang'an, made Emperor Xiaojing emperor as Emperor Xiaowu's replacement, and moved the capital from Luoyang
Luoyang
to Yecheng, thus dividing Northern Wei
Northern Wei
into two, and Emperor Xiaojing's state became known as Eastern Wei. Although Gao Huan treated him with respect, real power was in the hands of Gao Huan, and then Gao Huan's sons Gao Cheng and Gao Yang
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Chang'an
Chang'an
Chang'an
([ʈʂʰǎŋ.án] ( listen); simplified Chinese: 长安; traditional Chinese: 長安) was an ancient capital of more than ten dynasties in Chinese history, today known as Xi'an. Chang'an means "Perpetual Peace" in Classical Chinese
Classical Chinese
since it was a capital that was repeatedly used by new Chinese rulers. During the short-lived Xin dynasty, the city was renamed "Constant Peace" (Chinese: 常安; pinyin: Cháng'ān); yet after its fall in AD 23, the old name was restored
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Yuwen Tai
Yuwen
Yuwen
Tai (Chinese: 宇文泰; pinyin: Yǔwén Tài) (507–556), nickname Heita (黑獺), formally Duke Wen of Anding (安定文公), later further posthumously honored by Northern Zhou
Northern Zhou
initially as Prince Wen (文王) then as Emperor Wen (文皇帝) with the temple name Taizu (太祖), was the paramount general of the Chinese/Xianbei state Western Wei, a branch successor state of Northern Wei
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Emperor Xianwen Of Northern Wei
Emperor Xianwen of Northern Wei ((北)魏獻文帝) (454–476), personal name Tuoba Hong, was an emperor of the Xianbei dynasty Northern Wei. He was the first emperor in Chinese history who, after retiring in favor of his son Emperor Xiaowen to become Taishang Huang (retired emperor) in 471, continued to hold on to power until his death in 476—when the official history states vaguely that he may have been killed by his stepmother Empress Dowager Feng.Contents1 Family background 2 Reign2.1 Under Yifu Hun's regency 2.2 Under Empress Dowager Feng's regency 2.3 After assuming imperial authority3 As retired emperor 4 Era names 5 Personal information 6 ReferencesFamily background[edit] Tuoba Hong was born in 454, as Emperor Wencheng's oldest son
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Yuan Ye
Yuan Ye (元曄) (died 532), courtesy name Huaxing (華興), nickname Penzi (盆子), often known as the Prince of Changguang (長廣王), was briefly an emperor of the Xianbei
Xianbei
dynasty Northern Wei. He was declared emperor by members of the paramount general Erzhu Rong's clan in 530 after Emperor
Emperor
Xiaozhuang had killed Erzhu Rong, and he carried imperial title for several months
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Emperor Xiaowen Of Northern Wei
Emperor
Emperor
Xiaowen of Northern Wei
Northern Wei
((北)魏孝文帝) (October 13, 467 – April 26, 499), personal name né Tuoba
Tuoba
Hong (拓拔宏), later Yuan Hong (元宏), or Toba Hung II, was an emperor of the Northern Wei from September 20, 471 to April 26, 499.[1] Emperor
Emperor
Xiaowen implemented a drastic policy of sinicization, intending to centralize the government and make the multi-ethnic state more easy to govern. These policies included changing artistic styles to reflect Chinese preferences and forcing the population to speak the language and to wear Chinese clothes. He compelled his own Xianbei people and others to adopt Chinese surnames, and changed his own family surname from Tuoba
Tuoba
to Yuan
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Emperor Wu Of Liang
Emperor Wu of Liang
Emperor Wu of Liang
(梁武帝) (464–549), personal name Xiao Yan (蕭衍), courtesy name Shuda (叔達), nickname Lian'er (練兒), was the founding emperor of the Liang Dynasty
Liang Dynasty
of Chinese history. His reign, until the end, was one of the most stable and prosperous during the Southern Dynasties. Emperor Wu created universities and extending the Confucian
Confucian
civil service exams, demanding that sons of nobles study. He was well read himself and wrote poetry and patronized the arts. Although for governmental affairs he was Confucian
Confucian
in values, he embraced Buddhism as well. He himself was attracted to many Indian traditions. He banned the sacrifice of animals and was against execution
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History Of China
The earliest known written records of the history of China
China
date from as early as 1250 BC,[1][2] from the Shang dynasty
Shang dynasty
(c. 1600–1046 BC).[3] Ancient historical texts such as the Records of the Grand Historian (c. 100 BC) and the Bamboo Annals (296 BC) describe a Xia dynasty (c. 2070–1600 BC) before the Shang, but no writing is known from the period, and Shang
Shang
writings do not indicate the existence of the Xia.[3][4] The Shang
Shang
ruled in the Yellow River
Yellow River
valley, which is commonly held to be the cradle of Chinese civilization. However, Neolithic
Neolithic
civilizations originated at various cultural centers along both the Yellow River
Yellow River
and Yangtze
Yangtze
River
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Liang Dynasty
The Liang dynasty
Liang dynasty
(Chinese: 梁朝; pinyin: Liáng cháo) (502–557), also known as the Southern Liang dynasty
Liang dynasty
(南梁), was the third of the Southern Dynasties during China's Southern and Northern Dynasties period. It was located in East China
China
and South China, and replaced by the Chen dynasty
Chen dynasty
in 557
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