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Hurricane Irene–Olivia
Hurricane Irene–Olivia
Hurricane Irene–Olivia
was the first actively tracked tropical cyclone to move into the eastern Pacific Ocean
Pacific Ocean
from the Atlantic basin. It originated as a tropical depression on September 11, 1971, in the tropical Atlantic. The cyclone tracked nearly due westward at a low latitude, passing through the southern Windward Islands
Windward Islands
and later over northern South America. In the southwest Caribbean Sea, it intensified to a tropical storm and later a hurricane. Irene made landfall on southeastern Nicaragua
Nicaragua
on September 19, and maintained its circulation as it crossed the low-lying terrain of the country. Restrengthening after reaching the Pacific, Irene was renamed Hurricane Olivia, which ultimately attained peak winds of 115 mph (185 km/h)
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Bar (unit)
The bar is a metric unit of pressure, but is not approved as part of the International System of Units (SI)
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Pacific Hurricane
A Pacific hurricane
Pacific hurricane
is a mature tropical cyclone that develops within the eastern and central Pacific Ocean to the east of 180°W, north of the equator. For tropical cyclone warning purposes, the northern Pacific is divided into three regions: the eastern (North America to 140°W), central (140°W to 180°), and western (180° to 100°E), while the southern Pacific is divided into 2 sections, the Australian region (90E to 160°E) and the southern Pacific basin between 160°E and 120°W.[1] Identical phenomena in the western north Pacific are called typhoons
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Tropical Wave
Tropical waves, easterly waves, or tropical easterly waves, also known as African easterly waves in the Atlantic
Atlantic
region, are a type of atmospheric trough, an elongated area of relatively low air pressure, oriented north to south, which moves from east to west across the tropics, causing areas of cloudiness and thunderstorms. West-moving waves can also form from the tail end of frontal zones in the subtropics and tropics, and may be referred to as easterly waves, but these waves are not properly called tropical waves; they are a form of inverted trough sharing many characteristics with fully tropical waves. All tropical waves form in the easterly flow along the equatorward side of the subtropical ridge or belt of high pressure which lies north and south of the Intertropical Convergence Zone (ITCZ). Tropical waves are generally carried westward by the prevailing easterly winds along the tropics and subtropics near the equator
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Trough (meteorology)
A trough is an elongated (extended) region of relatively low atmospheric pressure, often associated with fronts.[1]A very large trough (about 8000 km or more) crosses the North Atlantic Ocean from north east to south west. The elongated cloud is surrounded by two big areas of higher atmospheric pressure, clearly shown with no clouds at all.Unlike fronts, there is not a universal symbol for a trough on a weather chart. The weather charts in some countries or regions mark troughs by a line. In the United States, a trough may be marked as a dashed line or bold line. In the UK, Hong Kong[2] and Fiji,[3] it is represented by a bold line extended from a low pressure center[4] or between two low pressure centers;[5] in Macau[6] and Australia,[7] it is a dashed line
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Curaçao
Curaçao
Curaçao
(/ˈkʊrəsaʊ/ KUR-ə-sow or /ˈkjʊərəsaʊ/ KEWR-ə-sow; Dutch: Curaçao, pronounced [kyːraːˈsʌu̯, kuːraːˈsʌu̯];[6] Papiamento: Kòrsou, pronounced [ˈkorsou]) is a Lesser Antilles island in the southern Caribbean
Caribbean
Sea and the Dutch Caribbean
Caribbean
region, about 65 km (40 mi) north of the Venezuelan coast. It is a constituent country (Dutch: land) of the Kingdom of the Netherlands. The country was formerly part of the Curaçao and Dependencies
Curaçao and Dependencies
colony (1815–1954) and is now formally called the Country
Country
of Curaçao (Dutch: Land Curaçao;[7] Papiamento: Pais Kòrsou);[8] it includes the main island of Curaçao
Curaçao
and the uninhabited island of Klein Curaçao
Curaçao
("Little Curaçao")
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Coordinated Universal Time
Coordinated Universal Time
Universal Time
(abbreviated to UTC) is the primary time standard by which the world regulates clocks and time. It is within about 1 second of mean solar time at 0° longitude;[1] it does not observe daylight saving time
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San Andrés, San Andrés Y Providencia
San Andrés (Spanish pronunciation: [ˌsan anˈdɾes]) is the capital city of the department of San Andrés, Providencia and Santa Catalina, in Colombia. As of 2005 its population was of 55,426.[1]Contents1 Overview 2 Twin towns 3 References 4 External linksOverview[edit] It is situated at the north end of San Andrés Island, on the Caribbean Sea. The population is considered to be about 20% Raizals and 80% mainland Colombians. The economy is mainly sustained by tourism and commercial fishing
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Eye (cyclone)
The eye is a region of mostly calm weather at the center of strong tropical cyclones. The eye of a storm is a roughly circular area, typically 30–65 km (20–40 miles) in diameter. It is surrounded by the eyewall, a ring of towering thunderstorms where the most severe weather and highest winds occur. The cyclone's lowest barometric pressure occurs in the eye and can be as much as 15 percent lower than the pressure outside the storm.[1] In strong tropical cyclones, the eye is characterized by light winds and clear skies, surrounded on all sides by a towering, symmetric eyewall. In weaker tropical cyclones, the eye is less well defined and can be covered by the central dense overcast, an area of high, thick clouds that show up brightly on satellite imagery
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South Caribbean Coast Autonomous Region
South Caribbean Coast Autonomous Region
South Caribbean Coast Autonomous Region
(Spanish: Región Autónoma de la Costa Caribe Sur, pronounced [reˈxjon au̯ˈtonoma ðe la ˈkosta kaˈɾiβe suɾ]), sometimes shortened to RACS, RACCS, or RAAS (for its former name of Región Autónoma del Atlántico Sur), is one of two autonomous regions in Nicaragua. It covers an area of 27,407 km² and has a population of 382,100 (2005 census). The capital is Bluefields
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Bluefields
Bluefields
Bluefields
(Spanish pronunciation: [bluˈfjelds]) is the capital of the South Caribbean Autonomous Region
South Caribbean Autonomous Region
(RACS) in Nicaragua. It was also the capital of the former Zelaya Department, which was divided into North and South Caribbean Coast Autonomous Regions. It is located on Bluefields
Bluefields
Bay at the mouth of the Escondido River in the municipality of the same name. Bluefields
Bluefields
was named after the Dutch pirate Abraham Blauvelt who hid in the bay’s waters in the early 17th century.[1] It has a population of 87,000 (2005)[2] and its inhabitants are mostly Mestizo then in smaller percentage Afro-descendant Creoles, and indigenous Miskitu, along with smaller communities of Garifuna, whites, Chinese, Mayangnas, Ulwas, and Ramas; that is the reason why Spanish language is the most spoken language in the city's urban area
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Lake Nicaragua
Lake
Lake
Nicaragua
Nicaragua
or Cocibolca or Granada (Spanish: Lago de Nicaragua, Lago Cocibolca, Mar Dulce, Gran Lago, Gran Lago Dulce, or Lago de Granada) is a freshwater lake in Nicaragua. Of tectonic origin and with an area of 8,264 km2 (3,191 sq mi), it is the largest lake in Central America,[2] the 19th largest lake in the world (by area) and the 9th largest in the Americas, slightly smaller than Lake
Lake
Titicaca. With an elevation of 32.7 metres (107 ft) above sea level, the lake reaches a depth of 26 metres (85 ft)
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Outflow (meteorology)
Outflow, in meteorology, is air that flows outwards from a storm system. It is associated with ridging, or anticyclonic flow. In the low levels of the troposphere, outflow radiates from thunderstorms in the form of a wedge of rain-cooled air, which is visible as a thin rope-like cloud on weather satellite imagery or a fine line on weather radar imagery. Low-level outflow boundaries can disrupt the center of small tropical cyclones. However, outflow aloft is essential for the strengthening of a tropical cyclone. If this outflow is undercut, the tropical cyclone weakens
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Pascal (unit)
The pascal (symbol: Pa) is the SI derived unit
SI derived unit
of pressure used to quantify internal pressure, stress, Young's modulus
Young's modulus
and ultimate tensile strength. It is defined as one newton per square metre.[1] It is named after the French polymath Blaise Pascal. Common multiple units of the pascal are the hectopascal (1 hPa = 100 Pa) which is equal to one millibar, and the kilopascal (1 kPa = 1000 Pa) which is equal to one centibar. The unit of measurement called standard atmosphere (atm) is defined as 101325 Pa.[2] Meteorological reports typically state atmospheric pressure in millibars.Contents1 Etymology 2 Definition 3 Standard units 4 Uses4.1 Hectopascal and millibar units5 See also 6 References 7 External linksEtymology[edit] The unit is named after Blaise Pascal, noted for his contributions to hydrodynamics and hydrostatics, and experiments with a barometer
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Hurricane Hunters
Hurricane hunters
Hurricane hunters
are aircrews that fly into tropical cyclones in the North Atlantic Ocean
Atlantic Ocean
and Northeastern Pacific Ocean
Pacific Ocean
to gather weather data. Currently, the US organizations that fly these missions are the United States Air Force Reserve's 53d Weather Reconnaissance Squadron and the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration's Hurricane Hunters. Such missions have also been flown by Navy units and other Air Force and NOAA
NOAA
units. Manned flights into hurricanes began in 1943 when, on a bet, pilot-trainer Colonel
Colonel
Joseph Duckworth flew a single-engine plane into a category 1 storm near Galveston, Texas
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Manzanillo, Colima
Manzanillo (Spanish pronunciation: [mansaˈniʝo]) is a city, seat of Manzanillo Municipality, in the Mexican state of Colima. The city, located on the Pacific Ocean, contains Mexico's busiest port that is responsible for handling Pacific cargo for the Mexico
Mexico
City area
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