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Human Rights In Kyrgyzstan
Human rights
Human rights
in Kyrgyzstan
Kyrgyzstan
improved greatly after the ouster of President Askar Akayev
Askar Akayev
in the 2005 Tulip Revolution
Tulip Revolution
and the installment of a more democratic government under Roza Otunbayeva.[citation needed] The country now faces political uncertainty as it attempts to sustain a democratic system. Corruption and instability continue to be noted, however. Formerly a republic of the Soviet Union, Kyrgyzstan
Kyrgyzstan
became independent in 1991
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The New York Times
The New York Times
The New York Times
(sometimes abbreviated as The NYT or The Times) is an American newspaper based in New York City
New York City
with worldwide influence and readership.[6][7][8] Founded in 1851, the paper has won 122 Pulitzer Prizes, more than any other newspaper.[9][10] As of September 2016, it had the largest combined print-and-digital circulation of any daily newspaper in the United States.[11] The New York Times is ranked 18th in the world by circulation. The paper is owned by The New York Times
The New York Times
Company, which is publicly traded but primarily controlled by the Ochs-Sulzberger family through a dual-class share structure.[12] It has been owned by the family since 1896; A.G
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Child Labor
Child labour
Child labour
refers to the employment of children in any work that deprives children of their childhood, interferes with their ability to attend regular school, and that is mentally, physically, socially or morally dangerous and harmful.[3] This practice is considered exploitative by many international organisations
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Authoritarianism
Authoritarianism
Authoritarianism
is a form of government characterized by strong central power and limited political freedoms
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News Media
The news media or news industry are forms of mass media that focus on delivering news to the general public or a target public. These include print media (newspapers, newsmagazines), broadcast news (radio and television), and more recently the Internet
Internet
(online newspapers, news blogs, etc.).Contents1 History1.1 In America2 Etymology 3 Broadcasting3.1 Television4 Newspapers4.1 Print journalism5 Newsmagazines 6 Newsreels 7 Online journalism 8 News
News
coverage and new media8.1 Fake News9 Media integrity 10 See also 11 References 12 External linksHistory[edit] Some of the first news circulations occurred in Renaissance Europe. These handwritten newsletters contained news about wars, economic conditions, and social customs and were circulated among merchants. The first printed news appeared by the late 1400's in German pamphlets that contained content that was often highly sensationalized
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Religious
There is no scholarly consensus over what precisely constitutes a religion.[1][2] It may be defined as a cultural system of designated behaviors and practices, world views, texts, sanctified places, prophesies, ethics, or organizations, that relate humanity to the supernatural, transcendental, or spiritual. Different religions may or may not contain various elements ranging from the divine,[3] sacred things,[4] faith,[5] a supernatural being or supernatural beings[6] or "some sort of ultimacy and transcendence that will provide norms and power for the rest of life".[7] Religious practices may include rituals, sermons, commemoration or veneration (of deities), sacrifices, festivals, feasts, trances, initiations, funerary services, matrimonial services, meditation, prayer, music, art, dance, public service, or other aspects of human culture. Religions have sacred histories and narratives, which may be preserved in sacred scriptures, and symbols and holy places, that aim mostly to give a
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Ethnic Minorities
A minority group refers to a category of people differentiated from the social majority, those who hold on to major of positions of social power in a society. It may be defined by law. The differentiation can be based on one or more observable human characteristics, including: ethnicity, race, religion, disability, gender, wealth, health or sexual orientation. Usage of the term is applied to various situations and civilizations within history despite its popular misassociation with a numerical, statistical minority.[1] In the social sciences, the term "minority" is sometimes used to describe social power relations between dominant and subordinate groups, rather than simply indicating demographic variation within a population.[2] Furthermore, from an intersectional sociological perspective, any given individual may simultaneously occupy both a majority identity and a minority identity, depending on the intersection of different social categories (e.g
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Human Rights Watch
Human Rights Watch
Human Rights Watch
(HRW) is an international non-governmental organization that conducts research and advocacy on human rights
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Orange Revolution
The Orange Revolution
Orange Revolution
(Ukrainian: Помаранчева революція, Pomarancheva revolyutsiya) was a series of protests and political events that took place in Ukraine
Ukraine
from late November 2004 to January 2005, in the immediate aftermath of the run-off vote of the 2004 Ukrainian presidential election, which was claimed to be marred by massive corruption, voter intimidation and direct electoral fraud
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Human Rights
Human rights
Human rights
are moral principles or norms[1] that describe certain standards of human behaviour, and are regularly protected as legal rights in municipal and international law.[2] They are commonly understood as inalienable[3] fundamental rights "to which a person is inherently entitled simply because she or he is a human being",[4] and which are "inherent in all human beings"[5] regardless of their nation, location, language, religion, ethnic origin or any other status.[3] They are applicable everywhere and at every time in the sense of being universal,[1] and they are egalitarian in the sense of being the same f
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Non-governmental Organization
Non-governmental organizations, nongovernmental[1] organizations, or nongovernment organizations,[2][3] commonly referred to as NGOs,[4] are usually non-profit and sometimes international organizations[5] independent of governments and international governmental organizations (though often funded by governments)[6] that are active in humanitarian, educational, health care, public policy, social, human rights, environmental, and other areas to effect changes according to their objectives.[7][8][9][10] They are thus a subgroup of all organizations founded by citizens, which include clubs and other associations that provide services, benefits, and premises only to members. Sometimes the term is used as a synonym of "civil society organization" to refer to any association founded by citizens,[11] but this is not how the term is normally used in the media or everyday language, as recorded by major dictionaries
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Human Trafficking
Human trafficking
Human trafficking
is the trade of humans for the purpose of forced labour, sexual slavery, or commercial sexual exploitation for the trafficker or others.[1][2] This may encompass providing a spouse in the context of forced marriage,[3][4][5] or the extraction of organs or tissues,[6][7] including for surrogacy and ova removal.[8] Human trafficking can occur within a country or trans-nationally. Human trafficking is a crime against the person because of the violation of the victim's rights of movement through coercion and because of their commercial exploitation
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Roza Otunbayeva
Roza Isakovna Otunbayeva (Kyrgyz: Роза Исаковна (Исак кызы) Отунбаева, Roza İsaqovna (İsaq qızı) Otunbayeva; born August 23, 1950) is a Kyrgyz diplomat and politician who served as the President of Kyrgyzstan
President of Kyrgyzstan
from 7 April 2010 until 1 December 2011. She was sworn in on July 3, 2010, after acting as interim leader following the 2010 April revolution which led to the ousting of President Kurmanbek Bakiyev
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MVD
The Ministry of Internal Affairs of the Russian Federation (MOI, Russian: Министерство внутренних дел, МВД, Ministerstvo Vnutrennikh Del, MVD) is the interior ministry of Russia. Its predecessor was founded in 1802 by Alexander I in Imperial Russia. The Ministry is headquartered in Moscow. The current Minister of Internal Affairs is General of Police
Police
Vladimir Kolokoltsev, who was the Moscow
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Andijan Massacre
Coordinates: 40°46′59″N 72°21′00″E / 40.78306°N 72.35000°E / 40.78306; 72.350002005 Andijan
Andijan
UnrestLocation of the eventsLocation Andijan, UzbekistanDate May 13, 2005; 12 years ago (2005-05-13)Target ProtestersDeaths 187–1,500PerpetratorsNational Security Service Ministry of the InteriorThe 2005 Andijan
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United Nations
The United Nations
United Nations
(UN) is an intergovernmental organization tasked to promote international cooperation and to create and maintain international order. A replacement for the ineffective League of Nations, the organization was established on 24 October 1945 after World War II
World War II
with the aim of preventing another such conflict. At its founding, the UN had 51 member states; there are now 193. The headquarters of the UN is in Manhattan, New York City, and is subject to extraterritoriality. Further main offices are situated in Geneva, Nairobi, and Vienna. The organization is financed by assessed and voluntary contributions from its member states. Its objectives include maintaining international peace and security, promoting human rights, fostering social and economic development, protecting the environment, and providing humanitarian aid in cases of famine, natural disaster, and armed conflict
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