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Hull House
Hull House
Hull House
was a settlement house in the United States
United States
that was co-founded in 1889 by Jane Addams
Jane Addams
and Ellen Gates Starr. Located on the Near West Side of Chicago, Illinois, Hull House
Hull House
(named after the original house's first owner Charles Jerald Hull) opened to recently arrived European immigrants. By 1911, Hull House
Hull House
had grown to 13 buildings
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Paul Kellogg
Paul Underwood Kellogg (September 30, 1879 – November 1, 1958) was an American journalist and social reformer. He died at 79 in New York on November 1, 1958. His obituary was printed the next day in The New York Times. He was born in Kalamazoo, Michigan, in 1879
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Occupational Safety
Occupational safety and health
Occupational safety and health
(OSH), also commonly referred to as occupational health and safety (OHS), occupational health,[1] or workplace health and safety (WHS), is a multidisciplinary field concerned with the safety, health, and welfare of people at work. These terms also refer to the goals of this field,[2] so their use in the sense of this article was originally an abbreviation of occupational safety and health program/department etc. The goals of occupational safety and health programs include to foster a safe and healthy work environment.[3] OSH may also protect co-workers, family members, employers, customers, and many others who might be affected by the workplace environment
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Working Class
The working class (also labouring class and proletariat) are the people employed for wages, especially in manual-labour occupations and industrial work.[1] Working-class occupations include blue-collar jobs, some white-collar jobs, and most pink-collar jobs
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Little Italy
Little Italy
Little Italy
is a general name for an ethnic enclave populated primarily by Italians or people of Italian ancestry, usually in an urban neighborhood. The concept of "Little Italy" holds many different aspects of the Italian culture. There are shops selling Italian goods as well as Italian restaurants lining the streets. A "Little Italy" strives essentially to have a version of the country of Italy placed in the middle of a big non-Italian city. This sort of enclave is often the result of periods of immigration in the past, during which people of the same culture settled together in certain areas
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Life (magazine)
Life was an American magazine that ran regularly from 1883 to 1972 and again from 1978 to 2000. During its golden age from 1936 to 1972, Life was a wide-ranging weekly general interest magazine notable for the quality of the photography. Life began as a humor magazine with limited circulation. Time owner Henry Luce
Henry Luce
bought the magazine in 1936, solely so that he could acquire the rights to its name, and launched a major weekly news magazine with a strong emphasis on photojournalism. Life was published weekly until 1972, as an intermittent "special" until 1978, and as a monthly from 1978 to 2000. After 2000, Time Inc.
Time Inc.
continued to use the Life brand for special and commemorative issues
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Chicago Sun-Times
The Chicago
Chicago
Sun-Times is a daily newspaper published in Chicago, Illinois, United States. It is the flagship paper of the Sun-Times Media Group.Contents1 History1.1 The 1940s, 1950s and 1960s 1.2 The 1970s 1.3 The 1980s 1.4 The 1990s 1.5 The 2000s 1.6 The 2010s2 Awards and notable stories 3 Staff 4 Early Edition 5 Gallery 6 References 7 External linksHistory[edit] The Chicago
Chicago
Sun-Times is the oldest continuously published daily newspaper in the city. It began in 1844 as the Chicago
Chicago
Daily Journal,[5] which was the first newspaper to publish the rumor, now believed false, that a cow owned by Catherine O'Leary
Catherine O'Leary
was responsible for the Chicago
Chicago
fire.[6] The Evening Journal, whose West Side building at 17-19 S
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Child Labor
Child labour
Child labour
refers to the employment of children in any work that deprives children of their childhood, interferes with their ability to attend regular school, and that is mentally, physically, socially or morally dangerous and harmful.[3] This practice is considered exploitative by many international organisations
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Women's Suffrage
Women's suffrage
Women's suffrage
(colloquial: female suffrage, woman suffrage or women's right to vote) is the right of women to vote in elections; a person who advocates the extension of suffrage, particularly to women, is called a suffragist.[1] Limited voting rights were gained by women in Finland, Iceland, Sweden
Sweden
and some Australian colonies and western U.S. states in the late 19th century.[2] National and international organizations formed to coordinate efforts to gain voting rights, especially the International Woman
Woman
Suffrage
Suffrage
Alliance (founded in 1904, Berlin, Germany), and also worked for equal civil rights for women.[3] In 1881, the Isle of Man
Isle of Man
gave women who owned property the right to vote
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Immigration Policy
An immigration policy is any policy of a state that deals with the transit of people across its borders into the country, but especially those that intend to work and stay in the country. Immigration policies can range from allowing no migration at all to allowing most types of migration, such as free immigration. Often, racial or religious bias is tied to immigration policy (for example, a country might only allow commonwealth citizens admission).[vague][citation needed] Ethnic relations policy within a country can usually be broadly categorized as either 'assimilationist' or 'multiculturalist'.[citation needed] Tax, tariff and trade
Tax, tariff and trade
rules that determine what goods immigrants may bring with them, what services they may perform while temporarily in the country, and who is allowed to remain like the European Union
European Union
has few immigration restrictions within it
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Juvenile Court
A juvenile court (or young offender's court) is a tribunal having special authority to pass judgements for crimes that are committed by children or adolescents who have not attained the age of majority. In most modern legal systems, children and teens who commit a crime are treated differently from legal adults that have committed the same offense. Industrialized countries differ in whether juveniles should be tried as adults for serious crimes or considered separately. Since the 1970s, minors have been tried increasingly as adults in response to "increases in violent juvenile crime." Young offenders may still not be prosecuted as adults
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Compulsory Education
Compulsory education refers to a period of education that is required of all people and is imposed by government. Depending on the country, this education may take place at a registered school (schooling) or at home (homeschooling). International Covenant on Economic, Social and Cultural Rights requires, within a reasonable number of years, the principle of compulsory education free of charge for all.[1]Contents1 History of compulsory education1.1 Antiquity1.1.1 Hellenic 1.1.2 Judea1.2 Medieval Era 1.3 Early Modern Era 1.4 Late Modern Era1.4.1 Europe 1.4.2 United States 1.4.3 Asia2 Per-country variations in the age range of compulsory education 3 Number of pupils and students enrolled in compulsory education 4 Criticism 5 See also 6 References 7 Further reading 8 External linksHistory of compulsory education[edit] Antiquity[edit] Compulsory education was not unheard of in ancient times
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London
London
London
(/ˈlʌndən/ ( listen)) is the capital and most populous city of England
England
and the United Kingdom.[7][8] Standing on the River Thames
River Thames
in the south east of the island of Great Britain, London has been a major settlement for two millennia. It was founded by the Romans, who named it Londinium.[9] London's ancient core, the City of London, largely retains its 1.12-square-mile (2.9 km2) medieval boundaries
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Immigrant
Immigration
Immigration
is the international movement of people into a destination country of which they are not natives or where they do not possess citizenship in order to settle or reside there, especially as permanent residents or naturalized citizens, or to take up employment as a migrant worker or temporarily as a foreign worker.[1][2][3] As for economic effects, research suggests that migration is beneficial both to the receiving and sending countries. Research, with few exceptions, finds that immigration on average has positive economic effects on the native population, but is mixed as to whether low-skilled immigration adversely affects low-skilled natives. Studies show that the elimination of barriers to migration would have profound effects on world GDP, with estimates of gains ranging between 67 and 147 percent
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Unemployment Compensation
Unemployment
Unemployment
benefits (depending on the jurisdiction also called unemployment insurance or unemployment compensation) are payments made by the state or other authorized bodies to unemployed people. In the United States, benefits are funded by a compulsory governmental insurance system, not taxes on individual citizens
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Workers' Compensation
Workers' compensation
Workers' compensation
is a form of insurance providing wage replacement and medical benefits to employees injured in the course of employment in exchange for mandatory relinquishment of the employee's right to sue their employer for the tort of negligence. The trade-off between assured, limited coverage and lack of recourse outside the worker compensation system is known as "the compensation bargain". One of the problems that the compensation bargain solved is the problem of employers becoming insolvent as a result of high damage awards. The system of collective liability was created to prevent that, and thus to ensure security of compensation to the workers
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