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Huipil
Huipil
Huipil
[ˈwipil] (from the Nahuatl
Nahuatl
word huīpīlli [wiːˈpiːlːi]) is the most common traditional garment worn by indigenous women from central Mexico
Mexico
to Central America. It is a loose-fitting tunic, generally made from two or three rectangular pieces of fabric which are then joined together with stitching, ribbons or fabric strips, with an opening for the head and, if the sides are sewn, openings for the arms. Traditional huipils, especially ceremonial ones, are usually made with fabric woven on a backstrap loom and are heavily decorated with designs woven into the fabric, embroidery, ribbons, lace and more. However, some huipils are also made from commercial fabric. Lengths of the huipil can vary from a short blouse-like garment or long enough to reach the floor
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Jarana Yucateca
The jarana is the typical dance and musical form of the Yucatan Peninsula. There exists two forms of metrics in jarana: "6 por 8" (in musical counts of 6/8) and "3 por 4" (in musical counts of 3/4). The jarana dance is done in pairs that consists of footwork without distinguished steps nor differentiation between women and men. The jarana is performed by a winds band ensemble. Gallery[edit]Yucatecas ataviadas con el traje regional de Yucatán.Conjunto jaranero del Ayuntamiento de Mérida bailando jaranas en la Plaza de Santa Lucía en Mérida.External links[edit]YouTube video - Jarana musicReferences[edit]Atlas Cultural de México. Música. México: Grupo Editorial Planeta. 1988
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Tlapanec People
The Tlapanec /ˈtlæpənɛk/, or Me'phaa, are an indigenous people of Mexico native to the state of Guerrero. The Tlapanec language is a part of the Oto-Manguean language family. The now extinct Subtiaba language of Nicaragua was a closely related language. Today Tlapanecs live primarily in the state of Guerrero a number more than 98,000. In pre-Columbian times they lived in the isolated mountain area along the Costa Chica region of Guerrero, just southeast of present-day Acapulco. Their territory was called Yopitzinco by the Aztecs who also referred to the Tlapanecs as Yopi[pronunciation?]. Yopitzinco was never conquered by the Aztecs and remained an independent enclave within the Aztec empire
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Isthmus Of Tehuantepec
The Isthmus
Isthmus
of Tehuantepec
Tehuantepec
(Spanish pronunciation: [tewanteˈpek]) is an isthmus in Mexico. It represents the shortest distance between the Gulf of Mexico
Mexico
and the Pacific
Pacific
Ocean. Prior to the opening of the Panama
Panama
Canal, it was a major shipping route known simply as the Tehuantepec
Tehuantepec
Route
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Nahuatl
Nahuatl
Nahuatl
(English: /ˈnɑːwɑːtəl/;[4] Nahuatl pronunciation: [ˈnaːwatɬ] ( listen)[cn 1]), known historically as Aztec,[3] is a language or group of languages of the Uto-Aztecan language family. Varieties of Nahuatl
Nahuatl
are spoken by an estimated 1.5 million Nahua peoples, most of whom live in central Mexico. Nahuatl
Nahuatl
has been spoken in central Mexico
Mexico
since at least the seventh century CE.[5] It was the language of the Aztecs, who dominated what is now central Mexico
Mexico
during the Late Postclassic period of Mesoamerican history
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Brocade
Brocade
Brocade
is a class of richly decorative shuttle-woven fabrics, often made in colored silks and with or without gold and silver threads.[1] The name, related to the same root as the word "broccoli", comes from Italian broccato meaning "embossed cloth", originally past participle of the verb broccare "to stud, set with nails", from brocco, "small nail", from Latin
Latin
broccus, "projecting, pointed".[2] Brocade
Brocade
is typically woven on a draw loom. It is a supplementary weft technique; that is, the ornamental brocading is produced by a supplementary, non-structural, weft in addition to the standard weft that holds the warp threads together
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Dallas Museum Of Art
The Dallas Museum of Art
Dallas Museum of Art
(DMA) is an art museum located in the Arts District of downtown Dallas, Texas, along Woodall Rodgers Freeway between St. Paul and Harwood. In 1984, the museum moved from its previous location in Fair Park
Fair Park
to the Arts District.[1] The new building was designed by Edward Larrabee Barnes, the 2007 winner of the American Institute of Architects
American Institute of Architects
Gold
Gold
Medal.[2] The museum collection is made up of more than 24,000 objects, dating from the third millennium BC to the present day. It is also defined by its dynamic exhibition policy[3] and award-winning educational programs.[4] The Mildred R. and Frederick M. Mayer Library (the museum’s non-circulating research library) contains over 50,000 volumes available to curators and the general public
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Brooklyn Museum
The Brooklyn
Brooklyn
Museum is an art museum located in the New York City borough of Brooklyn. At 560,000 square feet (52,000 m2), the museum is New York City's third largest in physical size and holds an art collection with roughly 1.5 million works.[2] Located near the Prospect Heights, Crown Heights, Flatbush, and Park Slope neighborhoods of Brooklyn
Brooklyn
and founded in 1895, the Beaux-Arts building, designed by McKim, Mead and White, was planned to be the largest art museum in the world. The museum initially struggled to maintain its building and collection, only to be revitalized in the late 20th century, thanks to major renovations. Significant areas of the collection include antiquities, specifically their collection of Egyptian antiquities
Egyptian antiquities
spanning over 3,000 years
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UNESCO
The United Nations
United Nations
Educational, Scientific and Cultural Organisation (UNESCO;[2] French: Organisation des Nations unies pour l'éducation, la science et la culture) is a specialized agency of the United Nations (UN) based in Paris
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Latin America
Latin
Latin
America[a] is a group of countries and dependencies in the Western Hemisphere where Spanish, French and Portuguese are spoken. The term originated in the French government in the mid-19th century as Amérique latine to consider French-speaking territories in the Americas
Americas
(Haiti, French Guiana, Martinique, Guadeloupe, Saint Martin, Saint Barthélemy) along with the larger group of countries where Spanish and Portuguese languages prevailed. It is, therefore, broader than the terms Ibero-America
Ibero-America
or Hispanic
Hispanic
America. The term excludes French Canada and modern French Louisiana. Latin
Latin
America consists of nineteen sovereign states and several territories and dependencies which cover an area that stretches from the northern border of Mexico
Mexico
to the southern tip of South America, including the Caribbean
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Circa
Circa
Circa
(from Latin, meaning 'around, about'), usually abbreviated c., ca. or ca (also circ. or cca.), means "approximately" in several European languages (and as a loanword in English), usually in reference to a date.[1] Circa
Circa
is widely used in historical writing when the dates of events are not accurately known. When used in date ranges, circa is applied before each approximate date, while dates without circa immediately preceding them are generally assumed to be known with certainty
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Radiocarbon Dating
Radiocarbon dating
Radiocarbon dating
(also referred to as carbon dating or carbon-14 dating) is a method for determining the age of an object containing organic material by using the properties of radiocarbon (14C), a radioactive isotope of carbon. The method was developed by Willard Libby
Willard Libby
in the late 1940s and soon became a standard tool for archaeologists. Libby received the Nobel Prize in Chemistry for his work in 1960. The radiocarbon dating method is based on the fact that radiocarbon is constantly being created in the atmosphere by the interaction of cosmic rays with atmospheric nitrogen. The resulting radiocarbon combines with atmospheric oxygen to form radioactive carbon dioxide, which is incorporated into plants by photosynthesis; animals then acquire 14C by eating the plants
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Jamiltepec
Santiago Jamiltepec (Mixtec: Casandoo) is a town, and the seat of surrounding municipality of the same name, in the Mexican state of Oaxaca
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San Juan Copala
San Juan Copala is a little town in the municipality of Santiago Juxtlahuaca in the Mexican state of Oaxaca, inhabited by Trique Indians. Its inhabitants have declared themselves autonomous of the Mexican state and founded the Autonomous Municipality of San Juan Copala in 2006
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Cuetzalan
Cuetzalan (Spanish  [kwetsa'lan] (help·info) is a small town set high in the hills in the north of the Mexican state of Puebla, 183 kilometres (114 mi) from Puebla, the state capital. Franciscan friars founded the town in 1547.[1]Contents1 Overview 2 Waterfalls 3 Caves 4 Media 5 ReferencesOverview[edit]View from the steps of the pyramids of Yohualichan.Cuetzalan is located in the Sierra Norte region. The town itself is characterized by sloping cobbled streets and numerous rustic buildings. It serves as the municipal seat for the surrounding municipality of Cuetzalan del Progreso. Cuetzalan was named a "Pueblo Mágico" in 2002. The town center is composed largely of handicraft markets as well as numerous stalls selling every-day necessities. As a tourist attraction, the town also has a few bars, restaurants and nightclubs. Getting to Cuetzalán from Puebla takes around four hours
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San Lucas Ojitlán
San Lucas Ojitlán
San Lucas Ojitlán
is a town and municipality in Oaxaca
Oaxaca
in south-western Mexico. The municipality covers an area of 595.81 km². It is part of the Tuxtepec District
Tuxtepec District
of the Papaloapan Region. As of 2005, the municipality had a total population of 19,871.[1] References[edit]^ "San Lucas Ojitlán"
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