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Hugh Robinson (aviator)
Hugh Armstrong Robinson (May 13, 1881 – 1963) was a pioneer in the earliest days of aviation, combining his skills of inventor, pilot, and daredevil. Among other things, he is said to have been the third person to successfully fly an aircraft after the Wright Brothers
Wright Brothers
in a plane of his own design and construction and the first person to make an air-sea rescue. His many firsts also include the first medical flight transporting a doctor to patient in Hammond, N.Y. in June 1912 and first U.S. airmail flight in 1911. Robinson also devised the term and art of dive-bombing.Contents1 Biography 2 Legacy 3 Resources 4 References 5 External linksBiography[edit] He was born on May 13, 1881 in Neosho, Missouri. In late 1910, Hugh Robinson became a pilot and chief engineer for Glenn Curtiss
Glenn Curtiss
at Curtiss Aviation, North Island, California
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Monaco
Monaco
Monaco
(/ˈmɒnəkoʊ/ ( listen); French pronunciation: ​[mɔnako]), officially the Principality
Principality
of Monaco
Monaco
(French: Principauté de Monaco),[a] is a sovereign city-state, country and microstate on the French Riviera
French Riviera
in Western Europe. France borders the country on three sides while the other side borders the Mediterranean Sea. Monaco
Monaco
has an area of 2.02 km2 (0.78 sq mi) and a population of about 38,400, according to the last census of 2016.[6] With 19,009 inhabitants per km², it is the second-smallest and most densely populated sovereign state in the world. Monaco
Monaco
has a land border of 5.47 km (3.40 mi),[6] a coastline of 3.83 km (2.38 mi), and a width that varies between 1,700 and 349 m (1,859 and 382 yd)
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Aviation
Aviation
Aviation
is the practical aspect or art of aeronautics, being the design, development, production, operation and use of aircraft, especially heavier-than-air aircraft.Contents1 Etymology 2 History2.1 Early beginnings 2.2 Lighter than air 2.3 Heavier than air3 Operations of aircraft3.1 Civil aviation3.1.1 Air transport 3.1.2 General aviation3.2 Military aviation3.2.1 Types of military aviation3.3 Air safety4
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Library Of Congress Control Number
The Library of Congress
Library of Congress
Control Number (LCCN) is a serially based system of numbering cataloging records in the Library of Congress
Library of Congress
in the United States. It has nothing to do with the contents of any book, and should not be confused with Library of Congress
Library of Congress
Classification.Contents1 History 2 Format 3 See also 4 References 5 External linksHistory[edit] The LCCN numbering system has been in use since 1898, at which time the acronym LCCN originally stood for Library of Congress
Library of Congress
Card Number. It has also been called the Library of Congress
Library of Congress
Catalog Card Number, among other names
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Special
Special
Special
or specials may refer to:Contents1 Music 2 Film and television 3 Other uses 4 See alsoMusic[edit] Special
Special
(album), a 1992
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International Standard Book Number
"ISBN" redirects here. For other uses, see ISBN (other).International Standard Book
Book
NumberA 13-digit ISBN, 978-3-16-148410-0, as represented by an EAN-13 bar codeAcronym ISBNIntroduced 1970; 48 years ago (1970)Managing organisation International ISBN AgencyNo. of digits 13 (formerly 10)Check digit Weighted sumExample 978-3-16-148410-0Website www.isbn-international.orgThe International Standard Book
Book
Number (ISBN) is a unique[a][b] numeric commercial book identifier. Publishers purchase ISBNs from an affiliate of the International ISBN Agency.[1] An ISBN is assigned to each edition and variation (except reprintings) of a book. For example, an e-book, a paperback and a hardcover edition of the same book would each have a different ISBN. The ISBN is 13 digits long if assigned on or after 1 January 2007, and 10 digits long if assigned before 2007
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Neosho Hugh Robinson Airport
Neosho Hugh Robinson Airport (IATA: EOS, ICAO: KEOS, FAA LID: EOS) is a city-owned public-use airport located three nautical miles (6 km) south of the central business district of Neosho, a city in Newton County, Missouri, United States.[1] Facilities and aircraft[edit] Neosho Hugh Robinson Airport covers an area of 687 acres (278 ha) at an elevation of 1,255 feet (383 m) above mean sea level. It has one asphalt paved runway designated 1/19 which measures 5,001 by 100 feet (1,524 x 30 m).[1] For the 12-month period ending February 27, 2008, the airport had 3,110 aircraft operations, an average of 259 per month: 93% general aviation, 6% air taxi and 1% military
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Jefferson Barracks
Army
Army
National Guard, Air National Guard, Veterans AdministrationJefferson Barracks
Barracks
Historic DistrictU.S. National Register of Historic PlacesU.S. Historic districtShow map of MissouriShow map of the USNearest city St. Louis
St. Louis
County, MissouriArea 337.8 acres (136.7 ha)Built 1826Architectural style Other, Military
Military
vernacularNRHP reference # 72001492[1]Added to NRHP February 1, 1972The Jefferson Barracks
Barracks
Military
Military
Post is located on the Mississippi River at Lemay, Missouri, south of St. Louis. It was an important and active U.S. Army
U.S. Army
installation from 1826 through 1946. It is the oldest operating U.S
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Albert Berry (parachutist)
Captain Albert Berry is one of two people credited as the first person to make a successful parachute jump from a powered airplane. The other contender is Grant Morton, who is reported to have jumped from a Wright Model B flying over Venice Beach, California sometime late in 1911. Morton's pilot was Phil Parmalee.[1] On 1 March 1912, Berry jumped from a Benoist pusher biplane from 1,500 feet (457 m) and landed successfully at Jefferson Barracks, Missouri. The pilot was Tony Jannus. The 36 foot (11 m) diameter parachute was contained in a metal canister attached to the underside of the plane - when Berry dropped from the plane his weight pulled the parachute from the canister. Rather than being attached to the parachute by a harness Berry was seated on a trapeze bar
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St. Louis, Missouri
St. Louis
St. Louis
Lambert International Airport MidAmerica St. Louis
St. Louis
AirportWaterways Mississippi RiverWebsite stlouis-mo.gov St. Louis
St. Louis
(/seɪnt ˈluːɪs/)[10][11][12] is an independent city[13] and major U.S. port in the state of Missouri, built along the western bank of the Mississippi River, which marks Missouri's border with Illinois. The city had an estimated March 22, 2018 population of 308,626[8] and is the cultural and economic center of the Greater St. Louis area (home to 2,807,338 people ), making it the largest metropolitan area in Missouri
Missouri
and the 19th-largest in the United States. Prior to European settlement, the area was a major regional center of Native American Mississippian culture. The city of St. Louis
St

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Lambert-St. Louis International Airport
International
International
mostly means something (a company, language, or organization) involving more than a single country. The term international as a word means involvement of, interaction between or encompassing more than one nation, or generally beyond national boundaries. For example, international law, which is applied by more than one country and usually everywhere on Earth, and international language which is a language spoken by residents of more than one country.Contents1 Origin of the word 2 Meaning in particular fields 3 See also 4 References 5 External links 6 SourcesOrigin of the word[edit] The term international was coined by the utilitarian philosopher Jeremy Bentham
Jeremy Bentham
in his Introduction to Principles of Morals and Legislation, which was printed for publication in 1780 and published in 1789
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North America
North America
North America
is a continent entirely within the Northern Hemisphere and almost all within the Western Hemisphere; it is also considered by some to be a northern subcontinent of the Americas.[3][4] It is bordered to the north by the Arctic
Arctic
Ocean, to the east by the Atlantic Ocean, to the west and south by the Pacific Ocean, and to the southeast by South America
South America
and the Caribbean
Caribbean
Sea. North America
North America
covers an area of about 24,709,000 square kilometers (9,540,000 square miles), about 16.5% of the earth's land area and about 4.8% of its total surface
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Seaplane
A seaplane is a powered fixed-wing aircraft capable of taking off and landing (alighting) on water.[1] Seaplanes that can also take off and land on airfields are in a subclass called amphibious aircraft. Seaplanes and amphibians are usually divided into two categories based on their technological characteristics: floatplanes and flying boats; the latter are generally far larger and can carry far more. These aircraft were sometimes called hydroplanes,[2] but currently this term applies instead to motor-powered watercraft that use the technique of hydrodynamic lift to skim the surface of water when running at speed.[1] Their use gradually tailed off after World War II, partially because of the investments in airports during the war
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USS Pennsylvania (ACR-4)
The second USS Pennsylvania (ACR-4/CA-4), also referred to as Armored Cruiser No. 4, and later renamed Pittsburgh, was a United States Navy armored cruiser, the lead ship of her class. She was laid down on 7 August 1901 by William Cramp and Sons
William Cramp and Sons
of Philadelphia, launched on 22 August 1903, sponsored by Miss Coral Quay, daughter of Senator Matthew S. Quay
Matthew S. Quay
of Pennsylvania, and commissioned on 9 March 1905, Captain Thomas C
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Eugene Ely
Eugene Burton Ely
Eugene Burton Ely
(October 21, 1886[1] – October 19, 1911) was an aviation pioneer, credited with the first shipboard aircraft take off and landing.Contents1 Background 2 Naval aviation
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Tailhook
A tailhook, arresting hook, or arrester hook is a device attached to the empennage (rear) of some military fixed-wing aircraft. The hook is used to achieve rapid deceleration during routine landings aboard aircraft carrier flight decks at sea, or during emergency landings or aborted takeoffs at properly equipped airports.Contents1 History 2 Description 3 Arresting gear 4 Use 5 Testing 6 See also 7 References 8 External linksHistory[edit] Tailhook
Tailhook
on an E-1B TracerOn January 18, 1911, Eugene Ely landed his Curtiss pusher airplane on a platform on the armored cruiser USS Pennsylvania anchored in San Francisco Bay. Ely flew from the Tanforan airfield in San Bruno, California and landed on the Pennsylvania, which was the first successful shipboard landing of an aircraft.[1][2] This flight was also the first ever using a tailhook system, designed and built by circus performer and aviator Hugh Robinson. Ely told a reporter: "It was easy enough
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