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Hovhannes Erznkatsi
Hovhannes Erznkatsi (Armenian: Հովհաննես Երզնկացի — John of Erznka or Erzinjan) (c. 1230– 1293) was an Armenian scholar and philosopher. He was nicknamed Blouz, probably because of his short stature. The little that has reached us of his voluminous works reveal an exceptionally gifted scholar, with treasured knowledge of vast scope. Living mostly in the latter part of the thirteenth century, he was also the last of the higher class of the Armenian authors of the ancient and medieval ages. Erznkatsi wrote hymns, commentaries, odes, eulogies, a Martyrology, an astronomical treatise on celestial elements, and a grammar. He was personally known and honored in almost every center of learning in Greater Armenia
Armenia
and Cilicia. An outstanding orator, he was the main speaker on the occasion of the conferring of knighthood on Hetoum and Thoros, sons of King Leon III, which was celebrated at Sis in 1284
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Armenian Language
Semi-official or unofficial (de facto) status: Georgia (Samtskhe-Javakheti)[a]  Lebanon[b]  Turkey[c]  Iran  United States (California)[d]Regulated by Institute of Language (Armenian National Academy of Sciences)[22]Language codesISO 639-1 hyISO 639-2 arm (B) hye (T)ISO 639-3 Variously: hye – Eastern Armenian hyw – Western Armenian xcl – Classical Armenian axm – Middle ArmenianGlottolog arme1241[23]Linguasphere 57-AAA-aThe Armenian-speaking world:   regions where Armenian is the language of the majorityThis article contains IPA phonetic symbols. Without proper rendering support, you may see question marks, boxes, or other symbols instead of Unicode
Unicode
characters
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Armenian Literature
Armenian literature
Armenian literature
begins around AD 400 with the invention of the Armenian alphabet
Armenian alphabet
by Mesrop Mashtots.Contents1 History1.1 Early literature 1.2 Medieval era 1.3 Religious literature 1.4 Cilician renaissance 1.5 Under foreign rule 1.6 Armenian troubadours2 19th century and early 20th century2.1 The Revivalists: Armenian Romanticists 2.2 Armenian Realists3 Under Soviet rule 4 Independent Armenia 5 See also 6 External links 7 ReferencesHistory[edit] Early literature[edit] Further information: Classical Armenian Only a handful of fragments have survived from the most ancient Armenian literary tradition preceding the Christianization of Armenia in the early 4th century due to centuries of concerted effort by the Armenian Church to eradicate the "pagan tradition"
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Komitas (Catholicos)
Soghomon Soghomonian,[A] ordained and commonly known as Komitas,[B] (Armenian: Կոմիտաս; 26 September 1869 – 22 October 1935) was an Armenian priest, musicologist, composer, arranger, singer, and choirmaster, who is considered the founder of Armenian national school of music.[4][7] He is recognized as one of the pioneers of ethnomusicology.[8][9] Orphaned at a young age, Komitas
Komitas
was taken to Etchmiadzin, Armenia's religious center, where he received education at the Gevorgian Seminary. Following his ordination as vardapet (celibate priest) in 1895, he studied music at the Frederick William University in Berlin. He thereafter "used his Western training to build a national tradition".[10] He collected and transcribed over 3,000 pieces of Armenian folk music, more than half of which were subsequently lost and only around 1,200 are now extant
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Grigor Magistros
Grigor is a masculine given name and a surname
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David The Invincible
Invincible
Invincible
may refer to:Contents1 Film and television 2 In print 3 Music3.1 Albums 3.2 Songs 3.3 Performers4 Ships 5 Other uses 6 See alsoFilm and television[edit] Invincible
Invincible
(2001 drama film), a drama by Werner Herzog about
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Tagh
The Tagh
Tagh
is a genre of Armenian monodic song writing. Its origin is ancient but its content and melodic line can be similar to modern vocal and instrumental compositions. The characteristics of the tagh are its expansiveness of form and volume, its free melodic style, the existence of instrumental passages and richness of rhythm. The tagh is basically a lyric song but it is not canonic like the sharakan. There are two types of taghs - religious and secular
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Armenian Chant
Armenian chant (Armenian: շարական, sharakan) is the melismatic monophonic chant used in the liturgy of the Armenian Apostolic Church. Armenian chant, like Byzantine chant, consists mainly of hymns. The chants are grouped in an oktoechos. The oldest hymns were in prose, but later versified hymns, such as those by Nerses Shnorhali, became more prominent. The official book of hymns, the sharakan, contains 1,166 hymns. The earliest surviving manuscripts with music notation date from the 14th century, and use a system of neumes known as Armenian neumes or khaz These seem to use a developed system but have not been deciphered. In the 19th century a new notation, still in use, was instroduced by Hamparsum Limonciyan. Armenian chant is now sung to a precise rhythm, including specific rhythmic patterns which are atypical of plainsong. This is considered by some scholars (such as P. Aubry) to be a result of Turkish influence, although others (such as R. P
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David Of Sassoun
David of Sassoun
David of Sassoun
(Armenian: Սասունցի Դավիթ Sasuntsi Davit) is the main hero of Armenia's national epic Daredevils of Sassoun, who drove Arab invaders out of Armenia. The Daredevils of Sassoun
Daredevils of Sassoun
(also known as after its main hero David of Sassoun) is an Armenian national epic poem recounting David's exploits. As an oral history, it dates from the 8th century, and was first put in written form in 1873 by Garegin Srvandztiants.[2][3] He also published other ethnographic books.[3] David of Sassoun
David of Sassoun
is the name of only one of the four acts, but due to the popularity of the character, the entire epic is known to the public as David of Sasun
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Ara The Beautiful
Ara the Beautiful
Ara the Beautiful
(also Ara the Handsome; Armenian: Արա Գեղեցիկ Ara Geghetsik) is a legendary Armenian hero. He is notable in Armenian literature for the popular legend in which he was so handsome that the Assyrian queen Semiramis
Semiramis
waged war against Armenia to get him. He is sometimes associated with the historical king of Ararat known as Arame who ruled in the 9th century BC. The legend[edit] Semiramis
Semiramis
(in Armenian Shamiram), heard about the beauty of the Armenian king, sent him a letter in which she asked him to become her husband and to ascend to the throne, trying to combine the two powers. However, messengers returned and passed her Ara's refusal which humiliated Shamiram. She felt hatred towards Ara, so she ordered her commanders to capture Ara alive in the region called Ararat, but he was vanquished and killed by one of her sons
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Tork Angegh
Tork Angegh
Tork Angegh
(Armenian: Տորք Անգեղ) was an ancient Armenian masculine deity of strength, courage, of manufacturing and the arts, also called Torq and Durq/Turq. A creature of unnatural strength and power, Tork was considered one of Hayk's great-grandsons and reportedly represented as an unattractive male figure.[1] He is mentioned by Armenian 4th Century historian Movses Khorenatsi
Movses Khorenatsi
and considered one of the significant deities of the Armenian pantheon prior to the time when it came under influence by Iranian and Hellenic religion and mythology. Taken in the context of Proto-Indo-European religions, it is conceivable that an etymological connection with Norse god Thor/Tyr is more than a simple coincidence. An analogy is frequently made with the Middle-Eastern god Nergal, also represented as an unattractive male. References[edit]^ Hacikyan, Agop Jack; Gabriel Basmajian; Edward S
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Vahagn
Vahagn
Vahagn
Vishapakagh ( Vahagn
Vahagn
the Dragon Reaper) or Vahakn (Armenian: Վահագն) was a god of fire and war worshiped anciently and historically in Armenia. Some time during Ancient history, he formed a "triad" with Aramazd and Anahit. Vahagn
Vahagn
was identified with the Greek deity Heracles. The priests of Vahévahian temple, who claimed Vahagn as their own ancestor, placed a statue of the Greek hero in their sanctuary
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Hayk
Hayk
Hayk
the Great (Armenian: Հայկ), Armenian pronunciation: [hajk], or The Great Hayk, also known as Hayk Nahapet (Հայկ Նահապետ, Armenian pronunciation: [hajk nahapɛt], Hayk
Hayk
the "head of family" or patriarch[1]), is the legendary patriarch and founder of the Armenian nation. His story is told in the History of Armenia
History of Armenia
attributed to the Armenian historian Moses of Chorene
Moses of Chorene
(410 to 490).Contents1 Etymology 2 Genealogy 3 Folklore3.1 Hayk
Hayk
and King Bel 3.2 Battle of Giants and defeat of Bel4 Comparative mythology 5 See also 6 References 7 Sources 8 External linksEtymology[edit] The name of the patriarch, Հայկ Hayk
Hayk
is not exactly homophonous with the name for "Armenia", Հայք Hayk’
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Satenik
Satenik
Satenik
(Armenian: Սաթենիկ) was the name of the princess who married Artashes, the king of Armenia. Their love story, known as Artashes and Satenik, is presented by the Armenian historian Movses Khorenatsi in his History of Armenia
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Special
Special
Special
or specials may refer to:Contents1 Music 2 Film and television 3 Other uses 4 See alsoMusic[edit] Special
Special
(album), a 1992
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Hethum II Of Armenia
Hethum II (Armenian: Հեթում Բ; 1266 – November 17, 1307), also known by several other romanizations,[a] was king of the Armenian Kingdom of Cilicia, ruling from 1289 to 1293, 1295 to 1296 and 1299 to 1303, while Armenia was a subject state of the Mongol Empire. He abdicated twice in order to take vows in the Franciscan order, while still remaining the power behind the throne as "Grand Baron of Armenia" and later as Regent for his nephew. He was the son of Leo II of Armenia
Leo II of Armenia
and Kyranna de Lampron, and was part of the Hethumid dynasty, being the grandson of Hethum I, who had originally submitted Cilicia to the Mongols in 1247
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