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Houston Public Library
Houston
Houston
Public Library is the public library system serving Houston, Texas, United States.Contents1 History 2 Locations2.1 Headquarters 2.2 Neighborhood libraries2.2.1 Special
Special
libraries 2.2.2 Former locations2.3 Partnershi
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Smith V. Allwright
Smith v. Allwright, 321 U.S. 649 (1944), was a landmark decision of the United States Supreme Court with regard to voting rights and, by extension, racial desegregation. It overturned the Texas state law that authorized the Democratic Party to set its internal rules, including the use of white primaries. The court ruled that it was unconstitutional for the state to delegate its authority over elections to the Democratic Party in order to allow discrimination to be practiced. This ruling affected all other states where the party used the white primary rule. The Democrats had effectively excluded minority voter participation by this means, another device for legal disenfranchisement of blacks across the South beginning in the late 19th century.Contents1 Background 2 Issue 3 The decision 4 References 5 Further reading 6 External linksBackground[edit] Lonnie E
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Andrew Carnegie
Andrew Carnegie
Andrew Carnegie
(/kɑːrˈneɪɡi/ kar-NAY-gee, but commonly /ˈkɑːrnəɡi/ KAR-nə-ghee or /kɑːrˈnɛɡi/ kar-NEG-ee;[3] November 25, 1835 – August 11, 1919) was a Scottish-American industrialist, business magnate, and philanthropist. Carnegie led the expansion of the American steel industry in the late 19th century and is often identified as one of the richest people (and richest Americans).[4] He became a leading philanthropist in the United States and in the British Empire. During the last 18 years of his life, he gave away about $350 million[5][note 1] to charities, foundations, and universities—almost 90 percent of his fortune. His 1889 article proclaiming "The Gospel of Wealth" called on the rich to use their wealth to improve society, and stimulated a wave of philanthropy. Carnegie was born in Dunfermline, Scotland, and emigrated to the United States with his parents in 1848
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Mayor Of Houston
This is a list of people who have served as mayor of the city of Houston
Houston
in the U.S. state of Texas. Until 2015, the term of the mayor was two years. Beginning with the tenure of Bob Lanier, the city charter imposed term limits on officeholders of no more than three terms (six years total). On November 3, 2015, voters approved Proposition 2, which extended the terms of the Mayor, City Controller and City Councilmembers to four years, while imposing a limit of two terms.Contents1 List of mayors of Houston 2 Living former mayors 3 See also 4 References 5 External linksList of mayors of Houston[edit]Term Mayor2016–present Sylvester Turner2010–2016 Annise Parker2004–2010 Bill White1998–2004 Lee Brown1992–1998 Bob Lanier1982–1992 Kathy Whitmire[1]1978–1981 Jim McConn1974–1977 Fred Hofheinz1964–1973 Louie Welch1958–1963 Lewis Cutrer1956–1957 Oscar F. Holcombe
Oscar F

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Separate But Equal
Separate but equal
Separate but equal
was a legal doctrine in United States constitutional law according to which racial segregation did not violate the Fourteenth Amendment to the United States Constitution, adopted during the Reconstruction Era, which guaranteed "equal protection" under the law to all citizens. Under the doctrine, as long as the facilities provided to each race were equal, state and local governments could require that services, facilities, public accommodations, housing, medical care, education, employment, and transportation be segregated by race, which was already the case throughout the former Confederacy. The phrase was derived from a Louisiana law of 1890, although the law actually used the phrase "equal but separate".[1][better source needed] The doctrine was confirmed in the Plessy v. Ferguson
Plessy v. Ferguson
Supreme Court decision of 1896, which allowed state-sponsored segregation
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Supreme Court Of The United States
The Supreme Court of the United States
United States
(sometimes colloquially referred to by the acronym SCOTUS[2]) is the highest federal court of the United States. Established pursuant to Article Three of the United States Constitution in 1789, it has ultimate (and largely discretionary) appellate jurisdiction over all federal courts and state court cases involving issues of federal law plus original jurisdiction over a small range of cases. In the legal system of the United States, the Supreme Court is generally the final interpreter of federal law including the United States
United States
Constitution, but it may act only within the context of a case in which it has jurisdiction
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Sweatt V. Painter
Sweatt v. Painter, 339 U.S. 629 (1950), was a U.S. Supreme Court case that successfully challenged the "separate but equal" doctrine of racial segregation established by the 1896 case Plessy v. Ferguson. The case was influential in the landmark case of Brown v. Board of Education four years later. The case involved a black man, Heman Marion Sweatt, who was refused admission to the School of Law of the University of Texas, whose president was Theophilus Painter, on the grounds that the Texas State Constitution prohibited integrated education.Contents1 Procedural history 2 U.S. Supreme Court 3 Legacy 4 See also 5 References 6 Further reading 7 External linksProcedural history[edit] The state district court in Travis County, Texas, instead of granting the plaintiff a right of mandamus, continued the case for six months. This allowed the state time to create a law school only for black students, which it established in Houston, rather than in Austin
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Houston Press
The Houston
Houston
Press is an alternative newspaper online publication published in Houston, Texas, United States. It is headquartered in the Midtown area. Previously it was also a weekly newspaper but as of November 3, 2017, the papers owners announced it was ceasing print publication but would continue online. The publication is supported entirely by advertising revenue and is free to readers. It reports a monthly readership of 1.6 million online users.[2] Prior to the 2017 cessation of the print edition, the Press was found in restaurants, coffee houses, and local retail stores
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Desegregation
Desegregation
Desegregation
is the process of ending the separation of two groups usually referring to races. This is most commonly used in reference to the United States. Desegregation
Desegregation
was long a focus of the Civil Rights Movement, both before and after the United States Supreme Court's decision in Brown v. Board of Education, particularly desegregation of the school systems and the military (see Military history of African Americans). Racial integration
Racial integration
of society was a closely related goal.Contents1 In the U.S. military1.1 Early history 1.2 World Wars I and II 1.3 Modern history2 In U.S. housing law 3 In the U.S. education system3.1 Asian Americans4 See also 5 References 6 External linksIn the U.S. military[edit] Early history[edit] Starting with King Philip's in the 17th century, blacks served alongside whites in an integrated environment North American
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Park Place, Houston, Texas
Park Place is a subdivision located in Houston, Texas, United States. Park Place is located outside of the 610 Loop and inside Beltway 8 in southeast Houston, near William P. Hobby Airport. Journalist John Nova Lomax described Park Place in a 2008 Houston Press article as "old, but not as tired as it looked a few years ago" as Park Place had new retail strip malls and renovated houses.[1]Contents1 Demographics 2 Cityscape 3 Government and infrastructure 4 Education 5 References 6 NotesDemographics[edit] As of the 2000 U.S. Census about 67% of the residents of the Park Place Super Neighborhood have an income below $35,000. The citywide rate for Houston is 57%. Therefore the real income for Park Place residents is below the average for the City of Houston.[2] Cityscape[edit] St. Joseph Village, a condominium complex with an ethnic Vietnamese population, is in Park Place. A St
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Librarian
A librarian is a person who works professionally in a library, providing access to information and sometimes social or technical programming. In addition, librarians provide instruction on information literacy
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Rice University
Rice University, officially William Marsh Rice University, is a private research university located on a 295-acre campus in Houston, Texas, United States. The university is situated near the Houston Museum District and is adjacent to the Texas
Texas
Medical Center. Rice is generally considered the foremost university and the most selective institution of higher education in the state of Texas.[10][11][12] Opened in 1912 after the murder of its namesake William Marsh Rice, Rice is now a research university with an undergraduate focus
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Philanthropy
Philanthropy
Philanthropy
means the love of humanity. A conventional modern definition is "private initiatives, for the public good, focusing on quality of life," which combines an original humanistic tradition with a social scientific aspect developed in the 20th century. The definition also serves to contrast philanthropy with business endeavors, which are private initiatives for private good, e.g., focusing on material gain, and with government endeavors, which are public initiatives for public good, e.g., focusing on provision of public services.[1] A person who practices philanthropy is called a philanthropist. Philanthropy
Philanthropy
has distinguishing characteristics separate from charity; not all charity is philanthropy, or vice versa, though there is a recognized degree of overlap in practice
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Circulating Library
A circulating library (also known as lending libraries and rental libraries) was first and foremost a business venture. The intention was to profit from lending books to the public for a fee.[1]Donald McDonald, stationer, and his Circulating Library, Gulgong, 1870Contents1 Overview1.1 Early circulating libraries2 Criticism of circulating libraries and novels 3 Publishing 4 Decline 5 ReferencesOverview[edit] Circulating libraries offered an alternative to the large number of readers who could not afford the price of new books in the nineteenth century but also desired to quench their desire for new material. Many circulating libraries were perceived as the provider of sensational novels to a female clientele but that was not always the case. Many private circulating libraries in Europe were created for scientific and/or literary audiences
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Debate
Debate
Debate
is contention in argument; strife, dissension, quarrelling, controversy; especially a formal discussion of subjects before a public assembly or legislature, in Parliament
Parliament
or in any deliberative assembly.[1] Logical consistency, factual accuracy and some degree of emotional appeal to the audience are elements in debating, where one side often prevails over the other party by presenting a superior "context" or framework of the issue. In a formal debating contest, there are rules for participants to discuss and decide on differences, within a framework defining how they will interact. Debating is carried out in debating chambers and assemblies of various types to discuss matters and to make resolutions about action to be taken, often by voting.[citation needed] Deliberative bodies such as parliaments, legislative assemblies, and meetings of all sorts engage in debates
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Lyceum
The lyceum is a category of educational institution defined within the education system of many countries, mainly in Europe
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