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House Of Glücksburg
The House of Glücksburg
Glücksburg
(also spelled Glücksborg), shortened from House of Schleswig-Holstein-Sonderburg-Glücksburg, is a Dano-German branch of the House of Oldenburg, members of which have reigned at various times in Denmark, Norway, Greece
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Schleswig-Holstein-Sonderburg-Glücksburg (elder Line)
Schleswig-Holstein-Sonderburg-Glücksburg
Schleswig-Holstein-Sonderburg-Glücksburg
was a line of the house of Schleswig-Holstein-Sonderburg, a cadet branch of the House of Oldenburg, from 1622 to 1779. History[edit] The line was founded by the partitioned-off duke Philip of Schleswig-Holstein-Sonderburg-Glücksburg
Schleswig-Holstein-Sonderburg-Glücksburg
(1584–1663). The line was named after Glücksburg Castle, where he had his headquarters. Members of this line bore the title of Duke of Schleswig-Holstein-Sonderburg-Glücksburg. However, they had limited powers in ruling their territory, since it was not an estate of the Realm, but a fief of the Duchy of Holstein-Gottorp
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Partitioned-off Duke
In the duchies of Schleswig and Holstein, the term "partitioned-off duke" (German: Abgeteilte Herren) was used to denote a series of dukes whose territories were not recognized by the estates of the realm.Contents1 Background 2 See also 3 References and sources 4 External linksBackground[edit] The background for this phenomenon was the Treaty of Ribe of 1460, in which King Christian I of Denmark, after his election as Duke of Schleswig and Count of Holstein, had laid down that Schleswig and Holstein should forever be ruled by a joint sovereign, in a personal union with Denmark. The promise was broken in 1544, when King Christian III of Denmark
Christian III of Denmark
divided the territories between himself and his half-brothers John II the Elder and Adolf. However, when Christian's son, Frederick II of Denmark, tried to divide the territory with his brother, John II the Younger, the Estates refused to pay John II homage
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Patrilineality
Patrilineality, also known as the male line, the spear side[1] or agnatic kinship, is a common kinship system in which an individual's family membership derives from and is recorded through his or her father's lineage. It generally involves the inheritance of property, rights, names or titles by persons related through male kin. A patriline ("father line") is a person's father, and additional ancestors, as traced only through males.Contents1 In the Bible 2 Agnatic succession 3 Salic Law 4 Genetic genealogy 5 See also 6 References 7 External linksIn the Bible[edit] In the Bible, family and tribal membership appears to be transmitted through the father. For example, a person is considered to be a priest or Levite if his father is a priest or Levite, and the members of all the twelve tribes are called Israelites because their father is Israel (Jacob)
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Renaissance
The Renaissance
Renaissance
(UK: /rɪˈneɪsəns/, US: /rɛnəˈsɑːns/)[1] is a period in European history, covering the span between the 14th and 17th centuries. It is an extension of the Middle Ages, and is bridged by the Age of Enlightenment
Age of Enlightenment
to modern history. It grew in fragments, with the very first traces found seemingly in Italy, coming to cover much of Europe, for some scholars marking the beginning of the modern age. The intellectual basis of the Renaissance
Renaissance
was its own invented version of humanism, derived from the concept of Roman Humanitas and the rediscovery of classical Greek philosophy, such as that of Protagoras, who said that "Man is the measure of all things." This new thinking became manifest in art, architecture, politics, science and literature
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Northern Europe
Northern Europe
Europe
is the general term for the geographical region in Europe
Europe
that is approximately north of the southern coast of the Baltic Sea. Nations usually included within this region are Iceland, the Faroe Islands, Denmark, Norway, Sweden, Finland, Estonia, Latvia
Latvia
and Lithuania, and occasionally Ireland, Britain, northern Germany, northern Belarus
Belarus
and northwest Russia. Narrower definitions may be based on other geographical factors such as climate and ecology. A broader definition would include the area north of the Alps
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Schleswig
The Duchy of Schleswig (Danish: Hertugdømmet Slesvig; German: Herzogtum Schleswig; Low German: Sleswig; North Frisian: Slaswik) was a duchy in Southern Jutland (Sønderjylland) covering the area between about 60 km north and 70 km south of the current border between Germany and Denmark. The territory has been divided between the two countries since 1920, with Northern Schleswig in Denmark and Southern Schleswig in Germany
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Flensburg Firth
Flensburg
Flensburg
Firth or Flensborg Fjord[1][2] (German: Flensburger Förde; Danish: Flensborg Fjord), is the westernmost inlet of the Baltic Sea. It forms part of the border between Germany
Germany
to the south and Denmark to the north. Its length is either 40 or 50 km, depending to the definition of its limits. It has the largest surface of all Förden and East Jutland Fjorde, which are a special type of inlets, different from geological fjords. Two peninsulas, Broager
Broager
peninsula on the northern side and Holnis peninsula on the southern side divide the inlet in an outer and an inner part. West of them, near the Danish coast, there are two small islands called Okseøerne (meaning Ox Isles). On the Danish side, outer part of the northern limits of the firth is formed by the island of Als with the town of Sønderborg
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Oldenburg
Oldenburg
Oldenburg
(German pronunciation: [ˈɔldn̩bʊʁk] ( listen)) is an independent city in the district of Oldenburg
Oldenburg
in the state of Lower Saxony, Germany. The city is officially named Oldenburg
Oldenburg
(Oldb) ( Oldenburg
Oldenburg
in Oldenburg) to distinguish from Oldenburg
Oldenburg
in Holstein. During the French annexation (1811–1813) in the wake of the Napoleonic war against Britain, it was also known as Le Vieux-Bourg in French. The city is situated at the Rivers Hunte
Hunte
and Haaren, in the northwestern region between the cities of Bremen
Bremen
in the east and Groningen
Groningen
(Netherlands) in the west
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John, Duke Of Schleswig-Holstein-Sonderburg
John the Younger or John of Denmark (Danish: Hans den yngre; German: Johann der Jüngere; 25 March 1545 – 9 October 1622) was the Duke
Duke
of Schleswig-Holstein-Sonderburg.Contents1 Biography 2 Family and children 3 Ancestry 4 NotesBiography[edit] John was born in Haderslev
Haderslev
as the fourth child (third son) of King Christian III of Denmark
Christian III of Denmark
and his wife, Dorothea of Saxe-Lauenburg. His elder brother, King Frederick II of Denmark, allotted him a portion of Schleswig-Sonderburg (today Danish Sønderborg) as his ducal seat. He acted actively in the Danish government, for example supporting his sister-in-law, the Queen, when his nephew, Christian IV of Denmark, was underage. There were plans for him to marry the Dowager Queen in 1588 or 1589, repudiating his second, young wife. John died in Glücksburg. Family and children[edit] John married twice
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King Of The Wends
The title of King of the Wends
Wends
(Swedish: Vendes Konung; Latin: Rex Vandalorum) denoted sovereignty, lordship, or claims over once-Western Slavic lands of southern coasts of the Baltic Sea, those otherwise called Mecklenburg, Holstein
Holstein
and Pomerania, and was used from the 12th century to 1972 by Kings of Denmark
Kings of Denmark
and from ca 1540 to 1973 by the Kings of Sweden.[2] The generally accepted interpretation is that the word refers to the Wends, West Slavic peoples that lived on the south shores of the Baltic Sea, although the situation is further complicated by the existence of the Vends, located between the Finns and the Wends
Wends
and with somewhat unknown origin. The title's one poetic explanation also was kingship over the antique people of the Vandals
Vandals
(vandalorum rex), but that idea came only in the 16th century
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Sonderburg
Sønderborg
Sønderborg
(Danish pronunciation: [ˈsønɐˌbɒːˀ] - (German:  Sonderburg (help·info)) is a Danish town of Region of Southern Denmark. It is the main town and the administrative seat of Sønderborg Municipality
Sønderborg Municipality
(Kommune). The town has a population of 27,434 (1 January 2014),[1] in a municipality of 75,264.Contents1 Overview 2 History 3 Education 4 Geography 5 Economy 6 Transportation 7 Notable natives7.1 Arts & Science 7.2 Public ideas 7.3 Business 7.4 Sport8 Panoramic view 9 Culture9.1 Musical Institutions 9.2 Attractions10 References 11 External linksOverview[edit]This section does not cite any sources. Please help improve this section by adding citations to reliable sources. Unsourced material may be challenged and removed
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Appanage
An appanage or apanage (pronounced /ˈæpənɪdʒ/) or French: apanage (French pronunciation: ​[a.pa.naʒ]) is the grant of an estate, title, office, or other thing of value to a younger male child of a sovereign, who would otherwise have no inheritance under the system of primogeniture
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Schleswig-Holstein-Sonderburg-Beck
Schleswig-Holstein-Sonderburg-Beck
Schleswig-Holstein-Sonderburg-Beck
(Schleswig-Holstein-Beck for short) was a line of the Schleswig-Holstein-Sonderburg
Schleswig-Holstein-Sonderburg
branch of the House of Oldenburg. It consisted of August Philipp, Duke of Schleswig-Holstein-Sonderburg-Beck
Schleswig-Holstein-Sonderburg-Beck
(1612-1675) and his male-line descendants. Schleswig-Holstein-Glücksburg, to which several present-day royal houses belong, is a branch of Schleswig-Holstein-Beck. The members of the line were titular dukes of Schleswig
Schleswig
and Holstein, and they were originally not ruling. The line is named after Beck, a manor in Ulenburg, Bishopric of Minden
Bishopric of Minden
(today Löhne, North Rhine Westphalia)
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Bishopric Of Minden
The Bishopric of Minden was a Roman Catholic diocese (German: Bistum Minden) and a state, Prince-bishopric of Minden (German: Hochstift Minden), of the Holy Roman Empire. Its capital was Minden which is in modern-day Germany.Contents1 History 2 Famous bishops 3 Auxiliary bishops 4 See also 5 ReferencesHistory[edit] The diocese was founded by Charlemagne in 803, after he had conquered the Saxons. It was subordinate to the Archbishopric-Electorate of Cologne. It became the Prince-Bishopric of Minden (German: Fürstbistum Minden) in 1180, when the Duchy of Saxony was dissolved. In the 16th century, the Protestant Reformation was starting to take hold in the state, under the influence of the Duchy of Brunswick-Lüneburg. Minden was occupied by Sweden in the Thirty Years' War, and was secularized
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Vassal
A vassal[1] is a person regarded as having a mutual obligation to a lord or monarch, in the context of the feudal system in medieval Europe. The obligations often included military support and mutual protection, in exchange for certain privileges, usually including land held as a tenant or fief.[2] The term is applied to similar arrangements in other feudal societies. In contrast, fealty (fidelitas) was sworn, unconditional loyalty to a monarch.[3]Contents1 Western vassalage 2 Difference between "vassal" and "vassal state" 3 Feudal
Feudal
Japanese equivalents 4 See also4.1 Similar terms5 Notes 6 References 7 External linksWestern vassalage[edit] In fully developed vassalage, the lord and the vassal would take part in a commendation ceremony composed of two parts, the homage and the fealty, including the use of Christian sacraments to show its sacred importance
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