HOME TheInfoList.com
Providing Lists of Related Topics to Help You Find Great Stuff
[::MainTopicLength::#1500] [::ListTopicLength::#1000] [::ListLength::#15] [::ListAdRepeat::#3]

picture info

HORSE
at least 48 published The HORSE (Equus ferus caballus) is one of two extant subspecies of Equus ferus . It is an odd-toed ungulate mammal belonging to the taxonomic family Equidae . The horse has evolved over the past 45 to 55 million years from a small multi-toed creature, Eohippus , into the large, single-toed animal of today. Humans began to domesticate horses around 4000 BC, and their domestication is believed to have been widespread by 3000 BC. Horses in the subspecies caballus are domesticated, although some domesticated populations live in the wild as feral horses . These feral populations are not true wild horses , as this term is used to describe horses that have never been domesticated, such as the endangered Przewalski\'s horse , a separate subspecies, and the only remaining true wild horse
[...More...]

"HORSE" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

Trinomen
In zoological nomenclature , a TRINOMEN (plural: trinomina), trinominal name, or ternary name, refers to the name of a subspecies . For example: " Homo sapiens sapiens ". A trinomen is a name with three parts: generic name , specific name and subspecific name . The first two parts alone form the binomen or species name. All three names are typeset in italics, and only the first letter of the generic name is capitalised. No indicator of rank is included: in zoology , subspecies is the only rank below that of species. For example: "Buteo jamaicensis borealis is one of the subspecies of the red-tailed hawk (Buteo jamaicensis)." If the generic and specific name have already been mentioned in the same paragraph, they are often abbreviated to initial letters. For example one might write: "The great cormorant Phalacrocorax carbo has a distinct subspecies in Australasia
Australasia
, the black shag P. c. novaehollandiae"
[...More...]

"Trinomen" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Guinness World Records
GUINNESS WORLD RECORDS, known from its inception in 1955 until 1998 as THE GUINNESS BOOK OF RECORDS and in previous United States
United States
editions as THE GUINNESS BOOK OF WORLD RECORDS, is a reference book published annually, listing world records both of human achievements and the extremes of the natural world. The book itself holds a world record, as the best-selling copyrighted book of all time. As of the 2017 edition, it is now in its 63rd year of publication, published in 100 countries and 23 languages. The international franchise has extended beyond print to include television series and museums. The popularity of the franchise has resulted in Guinness
Guinness
World Records becoming the primary international authority on the cataloging and verification of a huge number of world records; the organization employs official record adjudicators authorized to verify the authenticity of the setting and breaking of records
[...More...]

"Guinness World Records" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Carl Linnaeus
CARL LINNAEUS (/lɪˈniːəs, lɪˈneɪəs/ ; 23 May 1707 – 10 January 1778), also known after his ennoblement as CARL VON LINNé (Swedish pronunciation: ( listen )), was a Swedish botanist , physician and zoologist , who formalised the modern system of naming organisms called binomial nomenclature . He is known by the epithet "father of modern taxonomy". Many of his writings were in Latin and his name is rendered in Latin as CAROLUS LINNæUS (after 1761 CAROLUS A LINNé). Linnaeus
Linnaeus
was born in the countryside of Småland , in southern Sweden . He received most of his higher education at Uppsala University and began giving lectures in botany there in 1730. He lived abroad between 1735 and 1738, where he studied and also published a first edition of his Systema Naturae in the Netherlands
[...More...]

"Carl Linnaeus" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Synonym (taxonomy)
In scientific nomenclature , a SYNONYM is a scientific name that applies to a taxon that (now) goes by a different scientific name, although the term is used somewhat differently in the zoological code of nomenclature. For example, Linnaeus was the first to give a scientific name (under the currently used system of scientific nomenclature) to the Norway spruce, which he called Pinus abies. This name is no longer in use: it is now a synonym of the current scientific name which is Picea abies
Picea abies
. Unlike synonyms in other contexts, in taxonomy a synonym is not interchangeable with the name of which it is a synonym. In taxonomy, synonyms are not equals, but have a different status. For any taxon with a particular circumscription , position, and rank, only one scientific name is considered to be the correct one at any given time (this correct name is to be determined by applying the relevant code of nomenclature )
[...More...]

"Synonym (taxonomy)" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Subspecies
In biological classification , SUBSPECIES (abbreviated "SUBSP." or "SSP."; plural : "subspecies") is either a taxonomic rank subordinate to species , or a taxonomic unit in that rank. A subspecies cannot be recognized independently: a species will either be recognized as having no subspecies at all or at least two (including any that are extinct). In zoology , under the International Code of Zoological Nomenclature , the subspecies is the only taxonomic rank below that of species that can receive a name. In botany and mycology , under the International Code of Nomenclature for algae, fungi, and plants , other infraspecific ranks , such as variety , may be named. In bacteriology and virology , under standard bacterial nomenclature and virus nomenclature , there are recommendations but not strict requirements for recognizing other important infraspecific ranks. A taxonomist decides whether to recognize a subspecies or not
[...More...]

"Subspecies" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

Extant Taxon
NEONTOLOGY is a part of biology that, in contrast to paleontology , deals with living or recently extinct organisms . It is the study of living species , genera , families and other taxa with members still alive, as opposed to being all dead or extinct . For example, the moose is an extant species, while the Tyrannosaurus
Tyrannosaurus
is a long extinct one. In the group of molluscs known as the cephalopods , as of 1987 , there were approximately 600 extant species and 7,500 extinct species. A taxon can be classified as extinct if it is broadly agreed or certified that no members of the group are still alive. Conversely, an extinct taxon can be reclassified as existing if there are new discoveries of living species ("Lazarus species" ), or if previously-known existing species are reclassified as members of the taxon. The term neontologist is used largely by paleontologists referring to nonpaleontologists
[...More...]

"Extant Taxon" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Equilibrioception
SENSE OF BALANCE or EQUILIBRIOCEPTION is one of the physiological senses related to balance . It helps prevent humans and animals from falling over when standing or moving. Balance is the result of a number of body systems working together: the eyes (visual system ), ears (vestibular system ) and the body's sense of where it is in space (proprioception ) ideally need to be intact. The vestibular system, the region of the inner ear where three semicircular canals converge, works with the visual system to keep objects in focus when the head is moving. This is called the vestibulo-ocular reflex (VOR) . The balance system works with the visual and skeletal systems (the muscles and joints and their sensors) to maintain orientation or balance. Visual signals sent to the brain about the body's position in relation to its surroundings are processed by the brain and compared to information from the vestibular, visual and skeletal systems
[...More...]

"Equilibrioception" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Fight-or-flight Response
The FIGHT-OR-FLIGHT RESPONSE (also called HYPERAROUSAL, or the ACUTE STRESS RESPONSE) is a physiological reaction that occurs in response to a perceived harmful event , attack , or threat to survival. It was first described by Walter Bradford Cannon . His theory states that animals react to threats with a general discharge of the sympathetic nervous system , preparing the animal for fighting or fleeing. More specifically, the adrenal medulla produces a hormonal cascade that results in the secretion of catecholamines , especially norepinephrine and epinephrine . The hormones estrogen , testosterone , and cortisol , as well as the neurotransmitters dopamine and serotonin , also affect how organisms react to stress. This response is recognized as the first stage of the general adaptation syndrome that regulates stress responses among vertebrates and other organisms
[...More...]

"Fight-or-flight Response" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Taxonomy (biology)
TAXONOMY (from Ancient Greek τάξις (taxis ), meaning 'arrangement', and -νομία (-nomia), meaning 'method ') is the science of defining and naming groups of biological organisms on the basis of shared characteristics. Organisms are grouped together into taxa (singular: taxon) and these groups are given a taxonomic rank ; groups of a given rank can be aggregated to form a super-group of higher rank, thus creating a taxonomic hierarchy. The principal ranks in modern use are domain , kingdom , phylum (division is sometimes used in botany in place of phylum), class , order , family , genus and species . The Swedish botanist Carl Linnaeus
Carl Linnaeus
is regarded as the father of taxonomy, as he developed a system known as Linnaean taxonomy for categorization of organisms and binomial nomenclature for naming organisms
[...More...]

"Taxonomy (biology)" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Conservation Status
The CONSERVATION STATUS of a group of organisms (for instance, a species ) indicates whether the group still exists and how likely the group is to become extinct in the near future. Many factors are taken into account when assessing conservation status: not simply the number of individuals remaining, but the overall increase or decrease in the population over time, breeding success rates, and known threats. Various systems of conservation status exist and are in use at international, multi-country, national and local levels as well as for consumer use
[...More...]

"Conservation Status" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Synapsid
Theropsida Seeley , 1895 SYNAPSIDS (Greek , 'fused arch'), synonymous with THEROPSIDS (Greek, 'beast-face'), are a group of animals that includes mammals and every animal more closely related to mammals than to other living amniotes . They are easily separated from other amniotes by having a temporal fenestra , an opening low in the skull roof behind each eye, leaving a bony arch beneath each; this accounts for their name. Primitive synapsids are usually called pelycosaurs or pelycosaur-grade synapsids; more advanced mammal-like ones, therapsids . The non-mammalian members are described as MAMMAL-LIKE REPTILES in classical systematics; they can also be called STEM MAMMALS or PROTO-MAMMALS. Synapsids evolved from basal amniotes and are one of the two major groups of the later amniotes; the other is the sauropsids , a group that includes modern reptiles and birds
[...More...]

"Synapsid" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Chordate
And see text A CHORDATE is an animal belonging to the phylum CHORDATA; chordates possess a notochord , a hollow dorsal nerve cord , pharyngeal slits , an endostyle , and a post-anal tail , for at least some period of their life cycle. Chordates are deuterostomes , as during the embryo development stage the anus forms before the mouth. They are also bilaterally symmetric coelomates with metameric segmentation and a circulatory system . In the case of vertebrate chordates, the notochord is usually replaced by a vertebral column during development. Taxonomically, the phylum includes the following subphyla: the Vertebrata , which includes fish , amphibians , reptiles , birds , and mammals ; the Tunicata , which includes salps and sea squirts ; and the Cephalochordata
Cephalochordata
, which include the lancelets . There are also additional extinct taxa such as the Vetulicolia
[...More...]

"Chordate" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Veterinarian
A VETERINARY PHYSICIAN, colloquially called a VET, shortened from VETERINARIAN ( American English
American English
, Australian English
Australian English
) or VETERINARY SURGEON ( British English
British English
), is a professional who practices veterinary medicine by treating disease, disorder, and injury in animals
[...More...]

"Veterinarian" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Animal
ANIMALS are eukaryotic , multicellular organisms that form the biological kingdom ANIMALIA. With few exceptions, animals are motile (able to move), heterotrophic (consume organic material), reproduce sexually , and their embryonic development includes a blastula stage. The body plan of the animal derives from this blastula, differentiating specialized tissues and organs as it develops; this plan eventually becomes fixed, although some undergo metamorphosis at some stage in their lives. Zoology is the study of animals. Currently there are over 66 thousand (less than 5% of all animals) vertebrate species, and over 1.3 million (over 95% of all animals) invertebrate species in existence. Classification of animals into groups (taxonomy ) is accomplished using either the hierarchical Linnaean system; or cladistics , which displays diagrams (phylogenetic trees ) called cladograms to show relationships based on the evolutionary principle of the most recent common ancestor
[...More...]

"Animal" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

10th Edition Of Systema Naturae
The 10TH EDITION OF SYSTEMA NATURAE is a book written by Carl Linnaeus and published in two volumes in 1758 and 1759, which marks the starting point of zoological nomenclature . In it, Linnaeus introduced binomial nomenclature for animals , something he had already done for plants in his 1753 publication of Species Plantarum
Species Plantarum
. CONTENTS * 1 Starting point * 2 Revisions * 3 Animals * 3.1 Mammalia * 3.2 Aves * 3.3 Amphibia * 3.4 Pisces * 3.5 Insecta * 3.6 Vermes * 4 Plants * 5 References * 6 External links STARTING POINTBefore 1758, most biological catalogues had used polynomial names for the taxa included, including earlier editions of Systema Naturae. The first work to consistently apply binomial nomenclature across the animal kingdom was the 10th edition of Systema Naturae
[...More...]

"10th Edition Of Systema Naturae" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
.