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Homestead Act
The Homestead Acts
Homestead Acts
were several United States federal laws that gave an applicant ownership of land, typically called a "homestead," at no cost. In all, more than 270 million acres of public land, or nearly 10% of the total area of the U.S., was given away free to 1.6 million homesteaders; most of the homesteads were west of the Mississippi River. An extension of the Homestead Principle in law, the Homestead Acts were an expression of the "Free Soil" policy of Northerners who wanted individual farmers to own and operate their own farms, as opposed to Southern slave-owners who wanted to buy up large tracts of land and use slave labor, thereby shutting out free white men. The first of the acts, the Homestead Act of 1862, opened up millions of acres. Any adult who had never taken up arms against the U.S. government could apply. Women and immigrants who had applied for citizenship were eligible
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Franklin D. Roosevelt
Governor of New York GovernorshipPresident of the United States PresidencyFirst Term1932 campaignElection1st Inauguration First 100 daysNew Deal Glass-Steagall Act WPA Social Security SEC Fireside ChatsSecond Term1936 campaignElection2nd InaugurationSupreme Court Packing National Recovery Act 1937 Recession March of Dimes Pre-war foreign policyThird Term1940 campaignElection3rd InaugurationWorld War IIWorld War IIAttack on Pearl Harbor Infamy Speech Atlantic Charter Japanese Internment Tehran Conference United Nations D-DaySecond Bill of Rights G.I
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Deed
A deed (anciently "an evidence") is any legal instrument in writing which passes, affirms or confirms an interest, right, or property and that is signed, attested, delivered, and in some jurisdictions, sealed. It is commonly associated with transferring (conveyancing) title to property. The deed has a greater presumption of validity and is less rebuttable than an instrument signed by the party to the deed. A deed can be unilateral or bilateral. Deeds include conveyances, commissions, licenses, patents, diplomas, and conditionally powers of attorney if executed as deeds. The deed is the modern descendant of the medieval charter, and delivery is thought to symbolically replace the ancient ceremony of livery of seisin.[1] The traditional phrase signed, sealed and delivered refers to the practice of seals; however, attesting witnesses have replaced seals to some extent
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Idaho
Idaho
Idaho
(/ˈaɪdəhoʊ/ ( listen)) is a state in the northwestern region of the United States. It borders the state of Montana
Montana
to the east and northeast, Wyoming
Wyoming
to the east, Nevada
Nevada
and Utah
Utah
to the south, and Washington and Oregon
Oregon
to the west. To the north, it shares a small portion of the Canadian border with the province of British Columbia. With a population of around 1.6 million and an area of 83,569 square miles (216,440 km2), Idaho
Idaho
is the 14th largest, the 12th least populous and the 7th least densely populated of the 50 U.S. states. The state's capital and largest city is Boise. Idaho
Idaho
prior to European settlement was inhabited by Native American peoples, some of whom still live in the area
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Yeoman
A yeoman /ˈjoʊmən/ was a member of a social class in late medieval to early modern England. In early recorded uses, a yeoman was an attendant in a noble household; hence titles such as " Yeoman
Yeoman
of the Chamber", " Yeoman
Yeoman
of the Crown", " Yeoman
Yeoman
Usher", "King's Yeoman", Yeomen Warders, Yeomen of the Guard. The later sense of yeoman as "a commoner who cultivates his own land" is recorded from the 15th century; in military context, yeoman was the rank of the third order of "fighting men", below knights and squires, but above knaves. A specialized meaning in naval terminology, "petty officer in charge of supplies", arose in the 1660s.Contents1 Etymology 2 History 3 United States3.1 U.S. Navy
U.S. Navy
and U.S. Coast Guard4 Other references4.1 In popular culture 4.2 Other5 See also 6 Notes 7 Further reading 8 External linksEtymology[edit] The term is first recorded c
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Jeffersonian Democracy
Jeffersonian democracy, named after its advocate Thomas Jefferson, was one of two dominant political outlooks and movements in the United States from the 1790s to the 1820s. The term was commonly used to refer to the Democratic-Republican Party
Democratic-Republican Party
(formally named the "Republican Party"), which Jefferson founded in opposition to the Federalist Party
Federalist Party
of Alexander Hamilton
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Marginal Land
Marginal land
Marginal land
is land that is of little agricultural value because crops produced from the area would be worth less than any rent paid for access to the area.[1] Although the term marginal is often used in a subjective sense for less-than-ideal lands, it is fundamentally an economic term[2] that is defined by the local economic context
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Europe
Europe
Europe
is a continent located entirely in the Northern Hemisphere
Northern Hemisphere
and mostly in the Eastern Hemisphere. It is bordered by the Arctic
Arctic
Ocean to the north, the Atlantic Ocean
Atlantic Ocean
to the west, and the Mediterranean Sea to the south. It comprises the westernmost part of Eurasia. Since around 1850, Europe
Europe
is most commonly considered as separated from Asia
Asia
by the watershed divides of the Ural and Caucasus
Caucasus
Mountains, the Ural River, the Caspian and Black Seas, and the waterways of the Turkish Straits.[5] Though the term "continent" implies physical geography, the land border is somewhat arbitrary and has moved since its first conception in classical antiquity
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Public Land
In all modern states, some land is held by central or local governments. This is called public land. The system of tenure of public land, and the terminology used, varies between countries. The following examples illustrate some of the range.Contents1 Commonwealth countries 2 France 3 Portugal 4 Israel4.1 West Bank5 United States5.1 History 5.2 Recreation on U.S. public lands 5.3 Grazing on U.S. public lands6 See also 7 Footnotes 8 Further reading 9 External linksCommonwealth countries[edit] In several Commonwealth countries such as Australia, New Zealand
New Zealand
and Canada, public lands are referred to as Crown lands
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Land Improvement
Land development
Land development
is altering the landscape in any number of ways such as:Changing landforms from a natural or semi-natural state for a purpose such as agriculture or housing Subdividing real estate into lots, typically for the purpose of building homes Real estate
Real estate
development or changing its purpose, for example by converting an unused factory complex into condominia.Contents1 Economic aspects 2 Conversion of landforms2.1 Conversion to building land 2.2 Conversion to farmland 2.3 Restoration3 See also 4 ReferencesEconomic aspects[edit] In an economics context, land development is also sometimes advertised as land improvement or land amelioration. It refers to investments making land more usable by humans
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Freedman
A freedman or freedwoman is a former slave who has been released from slavery, usually by legal means. Historically, slaves were freed either by manumission (granted freedom by their owner) or emancipation (granted freedom as part of a larger group). A fugitive slave is one who escaped slavery by fleeing.Contents1 Ancient Rome 2 Arabian and North African slavery 3 United States3.1 Cherokee Freedmen4 See also 5 References 6 External linksAncient Rome[edit] Main article: Slavery
Slavery
in ancient RomeCinerary urn for the freedman Tiberius Claudius
Claudius
Chryseros and two women, probably his wife and daughterRome differed from Greek city-states
Greek city-states
in allowing freed slaves to become plebeian citizens.[1] The act of freeing a slave was called manumissio, from manus, "hand" (in the sense of holding or possessing something), and missio, the act of releasing
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Washington (state)
Washington (/ˈwɒʃɪŋtən/ ( listen)), officially the State of Washington, is a state in the Pacific Northwest
Pacific Northwest
region of the United States. Named after George Washington, the first president of the United States, the state was made out of the western part of the Washington Territory, which was ceded by Britain in 1846 in accordance with the Oregon Treaty
Oregon Treaty
in the settlement of the Oregon
Oregon
boundary dispute. It was admitted to the Union as the 42nd state in 1889. Olympia is the state capital. Washington is sometimes referred to as Washington State to distinguish it from Washington, D.C., the capital of the United States, which is often shortened to Washington. Washington is the 18th largest state with an area of 71,362 square miles (184,827 km2), and the 13th most populous state with over 7.4 million people
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Fourteenth Amendment To The United States Constitution
The Fourteenth Amendment (Amendment XIV) to the United States Constitution was adopted on July 9, 1868, as one of the Reconstruction Amendments. The amendment addresses citizenship rights and equal protection of the laws and was proposed in response to issues related to former slaves following the American Civil War. The amendment was bitterly contested, particularly by the states of the defeated Confederacy, which were forced to ratify it in order to regain representation in Congress. The Fourteenth Amendment, particularly its first section, is one of the most litigated parts of the Constitution, forming the basis for landmark decisions such as Brown v. Board of Education
Brown v. Board of Education
(1954) regarding racial segregation, Roe v. Wade
Roe v. Wade
(1973) regarding abortion, Bush v. Gore
Bush v. Gore
(2000) regarding the 2000 presidential election, and Obergefell v. Hodges
Obergefell v

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Tenant Farmer
A tenant farmer is one who resides on land owned by a landlord. Tenant farming is an agricultural production system in which landowners contribute their land and often a measure of operating capital and management; while tenant farmers contribute their labor along with at times varying amounts of capital and management. Depending on the contract, tenants can make payments to the owner either of a fixed portion of the product, in cash or in a combination. The rights the tenant has over the land, the form, and measure of the payment varies across systems (geographically and chronologically). In some systems, the tenant could be evicted at whim (tenancy at will); in others, the landowner and tenant sign a contract for a fixed number of years (tenancy for years or indenture)
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Sharecropper
Sharecropping
Sharecropping
is a form of agriculture in which a landowner allows a tenant to use the land in return for a share of the crops produced on their portion of land. Sharecropping
Sharecropping
has a long history and there are a wide range of different situations and types of agreements that have used a form of the system. Some are governed by tradition, and others by law. Legal contract systems such as the Italian mezzadria, the French métayage, the Spanish mediero, or the Islamic system of muqasat, occur widely.[citation needed]Contents1 Overview1.1 Advantages 1.2 Disadvantages2 Regions2.1 Africa 2.2 United States3 Sharecropping
Sharecropping
agreements 4 Farmers' cooperatives 5 Economic theories of share tenancy 6 See also 7 References 8 Further readingOverview[edit] Sharecropping
Sharecropping
has benefits and costs for both the owners and the tenant
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Southern United States
The Southern United States, also known as the American South, Dixie, Dixieland and the South, is a region of the United States
United States
of America. The South does not fully match the geographic south of the United States but is commonly defined as including the states that fought for the Confederate States of America
Confederate States of America
in the American Civil War.[2] The Deep South
Deep South
is fully located in the southeastern corner
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