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Hocking Valley Railway
The Hocking Valley
Hocking Valley
Railway (reporting mark HV)[1] was a railroad in the U.S. state
U.S. state
of Ohio, with a main line from Toledo to Athens and Pomeroy via Columbus. It also had several branches to the coal mines of the Hocking Valley
Hocking Valley
near Athens. The company became part of the Chesapeake and Ohio Railway
Chesapeake and Ohio Railway
system in 1910, and the line between Toledo and Columbus continues to see trains as CSX Transportation's Columbus Subdivision
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Reporting Mark
A reporting mark is an alphabetic code of one to four letters used to identify owners or lessees of rolling stock and other equipment used on certain railroad networks. In North America
North America
the mark, which consists of an alphabetic code of one to four letters, is stenciled on each piece of equipment, along with a one- to six-digit number. This information is used to uniquely identify every such rail car or locomotive, thus allowing it to be tracked by the railroad they are traveling over, which shares the information with other railroads and customers
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Gallipolis, OH
Gallipolis (/ˌɡæləpəˈlis/ GAL-ə-pə-LEES)[7] is a chartered village in the U.S. state
U.S. state
of Ohio
Ohio
and the county seat of Gallia County.[8] The municipality is located in Southeast Ohio
Ohio
on the Ohio River. The population was 3,641 at the 2010 census
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Delaware, OH
Delaware is a city in and the county seat of Delaware County, Ohio, United States.[4] Delaware was founded in 1808 and was incorporated in 1816. It is located near the center of Ohio, is about 30 miles (48 km) north of Columbus, and is part of the Columbus, Ohio Metropolitan Area
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Upper Sandusky, OH
Upper Sandusky
Upper Sandusky
is a city and the county seat of Wyandot County, Ohio, United States,[7] along the Sandusky River. The population was 6,596 at the 2010 census. The city takes its name from an earlier Wyandot Indian village of the same name, which was located nearby.[8] Upper Sandusky
Upper Sandusky
is rich in history. Its origins date back to the early 1780s. It was home to the Wyandotte Native Americans until 1842. Upper Sandusky
Upper Sandusky
became the Wyandot County seat in 1843. It was named "Upper" because it is located near the headwaters of the Sandusky River;[9] Sandusky, Ohio
Ohio
is at the mouth of the same river, some 50 miles (80 km) away
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Fostoria, OH
Fostoria /fɑːsˈtʊəriːə/ is a city located at the convergence of Hancock, Seneca, and Wood counties in the northwestern part of the U.S. state of Ohio. It is approximately 40 miles (64 km) south of Toledo and 90 miles (140 km) north of Columbus. The city is known for its railroads, as 100 trains pass through the city each day. The city is often visited by railfans, and a railroad viewing park, constructed in 2013 (dedicated 14 November 2013) hosts many railfins every day in a purpose built viewing platform. Fostoria was also the home for over a dozen glass factories during the end of the 19th century. The glass factories were established in Fostoria because of the discovery of natural gas in the area. As the gas supply became depleted, many of the factories closed or moved—including the Fostoria Glass Company
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Panic Of 1873
The Panic of 1873
Panic of 1873
was a financial crisis that triggered a depression in Europe and North America that lasted from 1873 until 1879, and even longer in some countries (France and Britain)
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Trackage Rights
Railway companies can interact with and control others in many ways. These relationships can be complicated by bankruptcies.Contents1 Operating 2 Leasing 3 Stock
Stock
ownership 4 Consolidation 5 Trackage rights 6 Haulage agreement 7 Mine Gate 8 History 9 United Kingdom9.1 Earliest railways10 Canals10.1 British Rail11 References 12 External linksOperating[edit] Often, when a railroad first opens, it is only a short spur of a main line. The owner of the spur line may contract with the owner of the main line for operation of the contractee's trains, either as a separate line or as a branch with through service
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Maumee River
The Maumee River
River
(pronounced /mɔːˈmiː/)[1] (Shawnee: Hotaawathiipi;[2] Miami-Illinois: Taawaawa siipiiw)[3] is a river running from northeastern Indiana
Indiana
into northwestern Ohio
Ohio
and Lake Erie in the United States. It is formed at the confluence of the St. Joseph and St. Marys rivers, where Fort
Fort
Wayne, Indiana, has developed, and meanders northeastwardly for 137 miles (220 km)[4] through an agricultural region of glacial moraines before flowing into the Maumee Bay of Lake Erie. Toledo, Ohio, developed at the Maumee River's mouth. The Maumee was designated an Ohio
Ohio
State Scenic River
River
on July 18, 1974. The Maumee watershed is Ohio’s breadbasket; it is two-thirds farmland, mostly corn and soybeans
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Ohio River
The Ohio
Ohio
River, which streams westward from Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, to Cairo, Illinois, is the largest tributary, by volume, of the Mississippi River
Mississippi River
in the United States. At the confluence, the Ohio
Ohio
is considerably bigger than the Mississippi
Mississippi
( Ohio
Ohio
at Cairo: 281,500 cu ft/s (7,960 m3/s);[2] Mississippi
Mississippi
at Thebes: 208,200 cu ft/s (5,897 m3/s)[3]) and, thus, is hydrologically the main stream of the whole river system. The 981-mile (1,579 km) river flows through or along the border of six states, and its drainage basin includes parts of 15 states. Through its largest tributary, the Tennessee River, the basin includes many of the states of the southeastern U.S
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Murray City, OH
Murray City is a village in Hocking County, Ohio, United States. The population was 449 at the 2010 census.Contents1 History 2 Geography 3 Demographics3.1 2010 census 3.2 2000 census4 Public services 5 Notable people 6 References 7 External linksHistory[edit] Murray City was platted in 1873. It was named for one Mr
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Hamden, OH
Hamden is a village in Vinton County, Ohio, United States. The population was 879 at the 2010 census.Contents1 History 2 Geography 3 Demographics3.1 2010 census 3.2 2000 census4 Notable people 5 ReferencesHistory[edit] Hamden was laid out in 1820.[6] It was incorporated as a village in 1876.[7] Geography[edit] Hamden is located at 39°9′39″N 82°31′28″W / 39.16083°N 82.52444°W / 39.16083; -82.52444 (39.160887, -82.524429).[8] According to the United States Census
Census
Bureau, the village has a total area of 0.57 square miles (1.48 km2), all land.[1] Demographics[edit]Historical populationCensus Pop.%±1870 364—1880 52042.9%1890 62219.6%1900 83834.7%1910 1,01921.6%1920 837−17.9%1930 8835.5%1940 9244.6%1950 9512.9%1960 1,0358.8%1970 953−7.9%1980 1,0106.0%1990 877−13.2%2000 871−0.7%2010 8790.9%Est. 2016 855 [9] −2.7%U.S
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Receivership
In law, receivership is a situation in which an institution or enterprise is held by a receiver—a person "placed in the custodial responsibility for the property of others, including tangible and intangible assets and rights"—especially in cases where a company cannot meet financial obligations or enters bankruptcy.[1] The receivership remedy is an equitable remedy that emerged in the English chancery courts, where receivers were appointed to protect real property.[2] Receiverships are also a remedy of last resort in litigation involving the conduct of executive agencies that fail to comply with constitutional or statutory obligations to populations that rely on those agencies for their basic human rights.[2] Receiverships can be broadly divided into two types:Those related to insolvency or enforcement of a security interest. Those where eitherA person is Incapable of managing their affairs and so the court appoints a receiver to manage the property on their behalf—
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Syndicate
A syndicate is a self-organizing group of individuals, companies, corporations or entities formed to transact some specific business, to pursue or promote a shared interest. In most cases formed groups aim to scale up their profits
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Charleston, WV
Charleston is the most populous city in and the capital of the U.S. state of West Virginia. Located at the confluence of the Elk and Kanawha rivers, the population during the 2016 Census
Census
Estimate was 49,138. The Charleston metropolitan area as a whole had 217,916 residents. Charleston is the center of government, commerce, and industry for Kanawha County, of which it is the county seat.[6] Early industries important to Charleston included salt and the first natural gas well.[7] Later, coal became central to economic prosperity in the city and the surrounding area. Today, trade, utilities, government, medicine, and education play central roles in the city's economy. The first permanent settlement, Ft. Lee, was built in 1788
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