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Hitachi Province
Hitachi Province
Hitachi Province
(常陸国, Hitachi no Kuni) was an old province of Japan
Japan
in the area of Ibaraki Prefecture.[1] It was sometimes called Jōshū (常州). Hitachi Province
Hitachi Province
bordered on Iwashiro, Iwaki, Shimōsa, and Shimotsuke Provinces. The ancient provincial capital and temple were located near modern Ishioka and have been excavated, while the chief shrine was further east at Kashima
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Louis-Frédéric
Louis-Frédéric Nussbaum, also known as Louis Frédéric or Louis-Frédéric (1923–1996), was a French scholar, art historian, writer and editor.[1] He was a specialist in the cultures of Asia, especially India
India
and Japan.Contents1 Early life 2 Career 3 Selected works 4 References 5 External linksEarly life[edit] Louis-Frédéric was born in Paris in 1923
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Kuji District, Ibaraki
Kuji (久慈郡, Kuji-gun) is a district located in Ibaraki Prefecture, Japan. Town[edit]DaigoMerger[edit]On December 1, 2004 the town of Kanasagō, and the villages of Satomi and Suifu merged into the expanded city of Hitachiōta.v t eIbaraki PrefectureMito (capital) Special
Special
citiesMito TsukubaCitiesBandō Chikusei Hitachi Hitachinaka Hitachiōmiya Hitachiōta Hokota Inashiki Ishioka Itako Jōsō Kamisu Kasama Kashima Kasumigaura Kitaibaraki Koga Moriya Naka Namegata Omitama Ryūgasaki Sakuragawa Shimots
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Awa Province (Chiba)
A province is almost always an administrative division, within a country or state. The term derives from the ancient Roman provincia, which was the major territorial and administrative unit of the Roman Empire's territorial possessions outside Italy. The term province has since been adopted by many countries, and in those with no actual provinces, it has come to mean "outside the capital city". While some provinces were produced artificially by colonial powers, others were formed around local groups with their own ethnic identities. Many have their own powers independent of federal authority, especially in Canada
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Special
Special
Special
or specials may refer to:Contents1 Music 2 Film and television 3 Other uses 4 See alsoMusic[edit] Special
Special
(album), a 1992
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International Standard Book Number
"ISBN" redirects here. For other uses, see ISBN (other).International Standard Book
Book
NumberA 13-digit ISBN, 978-3-16-148410-0, as represented by an EAN-13 bar codeAcronym ISBNIntroduced 1970; 48 years ago (1970)Managing organisation International ISBN AgencyNo. of digits 13 (formerly 10)Check digit Weighted sumExample 978-3-16-148410-0Website www.isbn-international.orgThe International Standard Book
Book
Number (ISBN) is a unique[a][b] numeric commercial book identifier. Publishers purchase ISBNs from an affiliate of the International ISBN Agency.[1] An ISBN is assigned to each edition and variation (except reprintings) of a book. For example, an e-book, a paperback and a hardcover edition of the same book would each have a different ISBN. The ISBN is 13 digits long if assigned on or after 1 January 2007, and 10 digits long if assigned before 2007
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Harvard University Press
Harvard University
Harvard University
Press (HUP) is a publishing house established on January 13, 1913, as a division of Harvard University, and focused on academic publishing.[2] In 2005, it published 220 new titles. It is a member of the Association of American University Presses. After the retirement of William P. Sisler in 2017, George Andreou was appointed as Director[3]; the editor-in-chief is Susan Wallace Boehmer. The press maintains offices in Cambridge, Massachusetts, near Harvard Square, in New York City, and in London, England. The press co-owns the distributor TriLiteral LLC with MIT Press
MIT Press
and Yale University Press.[4] Notable authors published by HUP include Eudora Welty, Walter Benjamin, E. O
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Japan
Coordinates: 35°N 136°E / 35°N 136°E / 35; 136Japan 日本国 Nippon-koku or Nihon-kokuFlagImperial SealAnthem: "Kimigayo" 君が代"His Imperial Majesty's Reign"[2][3] Government
Government
Seal of JapanGo-Shichi no Kiri (五七桐)Area controlled by Japan
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Google Books
Google
Google
Books (previously known as Google
Google
Bo
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Louis Frédéric
Louis-Frédéric Nussbaum, also known as Louis Frédéric or Louis-Frédéric (1923–1996), was a French scholar, art historian, writer and editor.[1] He was a specialist in the cultures of Asia, especially India
India
and Japan.Contents1 Early life 2 Career 3 Selected works 4 References 5 External linksEarly life[edit] Louis-Frédéric was born in Paris in 1923
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Tsukuba District, Ibaraki
Tsukuba (筑波郡, Tsukuba-gun) was a district located in Ibaraki Prefecture, Japan. At its greatest extent it included the areas of today's cities of Jōsō, Shimotsuma, Toride, Tsuchiura, Tsukuba, and Tsukuba Mirai. The district had two towns before the dissolution:Ina YawaraOn March 27, 2006, the town of Ina and the village of Yawara were merged to create the city of Tsukubamirai. Therefore, Tsukuba District was dissolved as a result of this merger. post-WWII Timeline[edit]April 1, 1953 - The village of Oho was elevated to town status. (4 towns, 22 villages) November 3, 1953 - The village of Kamisato was elevated to town status to become the town of Kamisato. (5 towns, 21 villages) June 1, 1954 - The village of Takamichiso was merged into the town of Shimotsuna (from Makabe District). The town of Shimotsuna was elevated to city status at the same day
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Taga District, Ibaraki
Taga (多賀郡, Taga-gun) was a district located in Ibaraki, Japan. On November 1, 2004, the town of Jūō was merged into the neighboring and expanding city of Hitachi. Therefore, the Taga District was dissolved as a result of this merger. As of 2003, the district had an estimated population of 13,373 and a density of 185.43 persons per km²
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Niihari District, Ibaraki
Niihari (新治郡, Niihari-gun) was a district located in Ibaraki, Japan. The district was dissolved on March 27, 2006. The district had only one village before dissolution:TamariTimeline (Heisei Era, 1989-2006)[edit]January 1, 1992 - The village of Chiyoda was elevated to town status. April 1, 1997 - The village of Dejima was elevated to town status and changed the name to Kasumigaura. March 28, 2005 - The town of Kasumigaura absorbed the town of Chiyoda to create the city of Kasumigaura. October 1, 2005 - The town of Yasato was merged into the expanded city of Ishioka. February 20, 2006 - The village of Niihari was merged into the expanded city of Tsuchiura. March 27, 2006 - The village of Tamari was merged with the towns of Ogawa and Minori (both from Higashiibaraki District) to create the city of Omitama
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Namegata District, Ibaraki
Namegata (行方郡, Namegata-gun) was a district located in Ibaraki Prefecture, Japan. As of 2003, the district has an estimated population of 40,930 and a density of 246.08 persons per km². The total area is 166.33 km². District timeline[edit]April 1, 2001 - The town of Itako absorbed the town of Ushibori to create the city of Itako. September 2, 2005 - The towns of Asō, Kitaura and Tamatsukuri were merged to create the city of Namegata
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Naka District, Ibaraki
Naka (那珂郡, Naka-gun) is a district of Ibaraki Prefecture, Japan. Following the January 21, 2005 formation of the city of Naka, the district is coextensive with the village of Tōkai. As of January 1, 2005 population data, the district has an estimated population of 35,467 and a density of 946.29 persons per km²
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Makabe District, Ibaraki
Makabe (真壁郡, Makabe-gun) was a district located in Ibaraki Prefecture, Japan. As of the Chikusei merger, but with 2003 population data, the district had an estimated population of 26,699 and a density of 288 persons per km². The total area was 92.62 km². Towns and villages at the time of closure[edit]Makabe YamatoMergers[edit]On March 28, 2005 - the towns of Akeno, Kyōwa and Sekijō were merged with the city of Shimodate to create the city of Chikusei. On October 1, 2005 - the town of Makabe, and the village of Yamato were merged with the town of Iwase (from Nishiibaraki District) to create the city of Sakuragawa
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