HOME TheInfoList.com
Providing Lists of Related Topics to Help You Find Great Stuff
[::MainTopicLength::#1500] [::ListTopicLength::#1000] [::ListLength::#15] [::ListAdRepeat::#3]

picture info

Maecenas
Gaius Cilnius Maecenas (/maɪˈsiːnəs/; 15 April 68 BC – 8 BC) was an ally, friend and political advisor to Octavian (who was to become the first Emperor of Rome as Caesar Augustus) as well as an important patron for the new generation of Augustan poets, including both Horace and Virgil. During the reign of Augustus, Maecenas served as a quasi-culture minister to the Emperor but in spite of his wealth and power he chose not to enter the Senate, remaining of equestrian rank. His name has become a byword for a wealthy, generous and enlightened patron of the arts.Contents1 Biography 2 Reputation 3 Maecenate (patronage) 4 Works 5 Gardens of Maecenas 6 Legacy 7 Film and television portrayals 8 See also 9 Notes 10 References10.1 Primary sources 10.2 Secondary sourcesBiography[edit] Expressions in Propertius[1] seem to imply that Maecenas had taken some part in the campaigns of Mutina, Philippi and Perugia
[...More...]

"Maecenas" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Consul
Consul
Consul
(abbrev. cos.; Latin
Latin
plural consules) was the title of one of the chief magistrates of the Roman Republic, and subsequently a somewhat significant title under the Roman Empire. The title was also used in other city states and also revived in modern states, notably in the First French Republic. The relating adjective is consular, from the consularis.Contents1 Modern use of the term 2 Medieval city states 3 French Revolution3.1 French Republic 3.2 Roman Republic 3.3 Bolognese Republic4 Later modern republics4.1 Paraguay5 Other uses in antiquity5.1 Other city states 5.2 Private sphere 5.3 Revolutionary Greece6 See also 7 Sources and referencesModern use of the term[edit] Main article: Consul
Consul
(representative) In modern terminology, a consul is a type of diplomat
[...More...]

"Consul" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Ptolemy I Soter
With Thaïs
Thaïs
(mistress):Lagus Leontiscus EirenWith Eurydice:Ptolemy Keraunos Meleager Argaeus Lysandra PtolemaisWith Berenice I:Ptolemy Philadelphus Arsinoe II PhiloteraFather Lagus or Philip II of MacedonMother ArsinoeBorn C. 367 BC MacedonDied 283/2 BC (aged 84) Alexandria, EgyptPtolemy I Soter (/ˈtɒləmi/; Greek: Πτολεμαῖος Σωτήρ, Ptolemaĩos Sōtḗr "Ptolemy the Savior"; c. 367 BC – 283/2 BC), also known as Ptolemy of Lagus (Πτολεμαῖος ὁ Λάγου/Λαγίδης), was a Macedonian Greek[1][2][3][4][5] general under Alexander the Great, one of the three Diadochi
Diadochi
who succeeded to his empire
[...More...]

"Ptolemy I Soter" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Ptolemy II Of Egypt
Ptolemy II Philadelphus
Ptolemy II Philadelphus
(Greek: Πτολεμαῖος Φιλάδελφος, Ptolemaîos Philádelphos "Ptolemy Beloved of his Sibling"; 309–246 BCE) was the king of Ptolemaic Egypt from 283 to 246 BCE. He was the son of the founder of the Ptolemaic kingdom Ptolemy I Soter and Berenice, and was educated by Philitas of Cos. He had two half-brothers, Ptolemy Keraunos and Meleager, who both became kings of Macedonia (in 281 BCE and 279 BCE respectively), and who both died in the Gallic invasion of 280–279 BCE. Ptolemy was first married to Arsinoë I, daughter of Lysimachus, who was the mother of his legitimate children; after her repudiation he married his full sister Arsinoë II, the widow of Lysimachus.[2] During Ptolemy's reign, the material and literary splendour of the Alexandrian court was at its height
[...More...]

"Ptolemy II Of Egypt" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Library Of Celsus
The Library of Celsus
Library of Celsus
is an ancient Roman building in Ephesus, Anatolia, now part of Selçuk, Turkey. It was built in honour of the Roman Senator
Roman Senator
Tiberius Julius Celsus Polemaeanus,[2][3] completed between circa 114–117 A.D.[4][5] by Celsus' son, Gaius Julius Aquila (consul, 110 AD)
[...More...]

"Library Of Celsus" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Ephesus
Ephesus
Ephesus
Archaeological Site UNESCO
UNESCO
World Heritage SiteCriteria Cultural: iii, iv, viReference 1018Inscription 2015 (39th Session)Area 662.62 haBuffer zone 1,246.3 ha Ephesus
Ephesus
(/ˈɛfəsəs/;[1] Greek: Ἔφεσος Ephesos; Turkish: Efes; may ultimately derive from Hittite Apasa) was an ancient Greek city[2][3] on the coast of Ionia, three kilometres southwest of present-day Selçuk
Selçuk
in İzmir Province, Turkey. It was built in the 10th century BC on the site of the former Arzawan capital[4][5] by Attic and Ionian Greek colonists. During the Classical Greek era it was one of the twelve cities of the Ionian League
[...More...]

"Ephesus" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Anatolia
Anatolia
Anatolia
(Modern Greek: Ανατολία, Anatolía, from Ἀνατολή, Anatolḗ, modern pronunciation Anatolí;[needs IPA] Turkish: Anadolu "east" or "(sun)rise"), also known as Asia
Asia
Minor (in Medieval and Modern Greek: Μικρά Ἀσία, Mīkrá AsíaTurkish: Küçük Asya, , modern pronunciation Mikrá Asía – "small Asia"), Asian Turkey, the Anatolian peninsula, or the Anatolian plateau, is the westernmost protrusion of Asia, which makes up the majority of modern-day Turkey. The region is bounded by the Black Sea
Black Sea
to the north, the Mediterranean Sea
Mediterranean Sea
to the south, and the Aegean Sea
Aegean Sea
to the west
[...More...]

"Anatolia" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Selçuk
Selçuk
Selçuk
is the central town of Selçuk
Selçuk
district, İzmir Province
İzmir Province
in Turkey, 2 kilometres (1 mile) northeast of the ancient city of Ephesus. Its original Greek name, Agios Theologos (Άγιος Θεολόγος), referred to John the Theologian. In the 14th century, it was the capital of the Emirate of Aydin. Under the Ottoman Empire, it was known as Ayasoluk
[...More...]

"Selçuk" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Turkey
Turkey
Turkey
(Turkish: Türkiye [ˈtyɾcije]), officially the Republic of Turkey
Turkey
(Turkish: Türkiye Cumhuriyeti [ˈtyɾcije d͡ʒumˈhuɾijeti] ( listen)), is a transcontinental country in Eurasia, mainly in Anatolia
Anatolia
in Western Asia, with a smaller portion on the Balkan peninsula in Southeast Europe.[7] Turkey
Turkey
is bordered by eight countries with Greece
Greece
and Bulgaria
Bulgaria
to the northwest; Georgia to the northeast; Armenia, the Azerbaijan
Azerbaijan
and Iran
Iran
to the east; and Iraq
Iraq
and Syria
Syria
to the south
[...More...]

"Turkey" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Roman Senator
The Roman Senate
Senate
(Latin: Senatus Romanus; Italian: Senato Romano) was a political institution in ancient Rome. It was one of the most enduring institutions in Roman history, being established in the first days of the city (traditionally founded in 753 BC). It survived the overthrow of the kings in 509 BC, the fall of the Roman Republic
Roman Republic
in the 1st century BC, the division of the Roman Empire
Roman Empire
in 395 AD, the fall of the Western Roman Empire
Roman Empire
in 476 AD, and the barbarian rule of Rome
Rome
in the 5th, 6th, and 7th centuries. During the days of the kingdom, it was little more than an advisory council to the king
[...More...]

"Roman Senator" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

Tiberius Julius Celsus Polemaeanus
Tiberius Julius Celsus Polemaeanus (Greek: Τιβέριος Ιούλιος Κέλσος Πολεμαιανός, translit. Tibérios Ioúlios Kélsos Polemaianós)[1] commonly known as Celsus (ca. 45 – before ca. 120) was an Ancient Greek Roman citizen who became a Roman senator,[2][3] and served as a Roman consul as the colleague of Lucius Stertinius Avitus.[4] Celsus Polemaeanus was a wealthy and popular citizen and benefactor of Ephesus, and was buried in a sarcophagus beneath the famous Library of Celsus,[5] which was built as a mausoleum in his honor by his son Tiberius Julius Aquila Polemaeanus.[6]Contents1 Biography 2 Family 3 Library of Celsus 4 ReferencesBiography[edit]The Library of Celsus, which was founded by Celsus who is buried in a sarcophagus beneath the library.[5]Celsus was born ca
[...More...]

"Tiberius Julius Celsus Polemaeanus" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

Gaius Julius Aquila
Gaius Julius Aquila can refer to a number of different people from classical antiquity. Knight[edit] Gaius Julius Aquila was a Roman knight, stationed with a few cohorts, in 50 CE, to protect Tiberius Julius Cotys I, king of the Bosporan Kingdom, who had received the sovereignty after the expulsion of Tiberius Julius Mithridates. In the same year, Aquila obtained the praetorian insignia.[1] Consul[edit] Gaius Julius Aquila was Roman consul in 110 AD, and built the Library of Celsus in honor of his father, Roman senator Tiberius Julius Celsus Polemaeanus.[2][3] References[edit]^ Tacitus, Annals 12.15, 21 ^ Carrier, Richard (2016). Science Education in the Early Roman Empire. Pitchstone Publishing. ISBN 9781634310918. Retrieved 2017-02-26.  ^ White, Adam G. (2015). Where is the Wise Man?: Graeco-Roman Education as a Background to the Divisions in 1 Corinthians 1-4. The Library of New Testament Studies. Bloomsbury Publishing. ISBN 9780567664174
[...More...]

"Gaius Julius Aquila" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Scroll
A scroll (from the Old French escroe or escroue), also known as a roll, is a roll of papyrus, parchment, or paper containing writing.[1]Contents1 Structure 2 History of scroll use 3 Rolls 4 Scotland 5 Replacement by the codex 6 Recent discovery 7 Modern technology 8 See also 9 References 10 External linksStructure[edit] A scroll is usually divided up into pages, which are sometimes separate sheets of papyrus or parchment glued together at the edges, or may be marked divisions of a continuous roll of writing material. The scroll is usually unrolled so that one page is exposed at a time, for writing or reading, with the remaining pages rolled up to the left and right of the visible page
[...More...]

"Scroll" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

Great Libraries Of The Ancient World
The great libraries of the ancient world served as archives for empires, sanctuaries for sacred writings, and depositories of literature and chronicles.Contents1 Algeria 2 Anatolia 3 China 4 Egypt 5 Ethiopia 6 Greece 7 India 8 Iran 9 Iraq 10 Italy 11 Israel 12 Syria 13 See also 14 Notes 15 References 16 External linksAlgeria[edit]Timgad (250 A.D.) (Modern Algeria)The library was a gift to the Roman people and province of Thamugadi or Timgad by Julius Quintianus Flavius Rogatianus in the third century.[1] The library contained an expansive arched hall which consisted of a reading room, stack room, and a rotunda for lectures.[1] The library was quite large measuring eighty one feet in length by seventy seven feet in width.[1] Oblong alcoves held wooden cabinets along walls of which the manuscripts were maintained.[1] In addition there is evidence for free-standing bookcases in the center as well as a reading desk.[1] There is no evidence as to how many
[...More...]

"Great Libraries Of The Ancient World" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Hellenistic Civilization
The Hellenistic
Hellenistic
period covers the period of Mediterranean
Mediterranean
history between the death of Alexander the Great
Alexander the Great
in 323 BC and the emergence of the Roman Empire
Roman Empire
as signified by the Battle of Actium
Battle of Actium
in 31 BC[1] and the subsequent conquest of Ptolemaic Egypt
Egypt
the following year.[2] The Ancient Greek
Ancient Greek
word Hellas (Ἑλλάς, Ellás) is the original word for Greece, from which the word "Hellenistic" was derived.[3] At this time, Greek cultural influence and power was at its peak in Europe, North Africa
North Africa
and Western Asia, experiencing prosperity and progress in the arts, exploration, literature, theatre, architecture, music, mathematics, philosophy, and science
[...More...]

"Hellenistic Civilization" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
.