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History Of Ontario
The History of Ontario
Ontario
covers the period from the arrival of Paleo-Indians
Paleo-Indians
thousands of years ago to the present day. The lands that make up present-day Ontario, the most populous province of Canada as of the early 21st century, have been inhabited for millennia by groups of Aboriginal people, with French and British exploration and colonization commencing in the 17th century
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Lower Canada
 Canada ∟ Quebec  ∟ Newfoundland and LabradorThe Province of Lower Canada
Canada
(French: province du Bas-Canada) was a British colony on the lower Saint Lawrence River
Saint Lawrence River
and the shores of the Gulf of Saint Lawrence
Gulf of Saint Lawrence
(1791–1841)
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Étienne Brûlé
Étienne Brûlé
Étienne Brûlé
(French pronunciation: ​[etjɛn bʁyle]; c. 1592 – c. June 1633)[1][2] was the first European explorer to journey beyond the St. Lawrence River
St. Lawrence River
in what is today Canada. He spent much of his early life among the Hurons, and mastered their language and culture. Brûlé became an interpreter and guide for Samuel de Champlain, who later sent Brûlé on a number of exploratory missions. Among his many travels were explorations of Georgian Bay
Georgian Bay
and Lake Huron, as well as the Humber and Ottawa Rivers. In 1629, during the Anglo-French War, he escaped after being captured by the Seneca tribe
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British Colonization Of The Americas
The British colonization of the Americas
British colonization of the Americas
(including colonization by both the English and the Scots) began in 1607 in Jamestown, Virginia, and reached its peak when colonies had been established throughout the Americas. The English, and later the British, were among the most important colonizers of the Americas, and their American empire came to rival the Spanish American colonies in military and economic might. Three types of colonies were established in the English overseas possessions in America of the 17th century and continued into the British Empire
British Empire
at the height of its power in the 18th century. These were charter colonies, proprietary colonies, and royal colonies. A group of 13 British American colonies collectively broke from the British Empire
British Empire
in the 1770s through a successful revolution, establishing the modern United States
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Algonquian Peoples
The Algonquian are one of the most populous and widespread North American native language groups. Today, thousands of individuals identify with various Algonquian peoples. Historically, the peoples were prominent along the Atlantic Coast and into the interior along the St. Lawrence River
St. Lawrence River
and around the Great Lakes. This grouping consists of the peoples who speak Algonquian languages.A 16th-century sketch of the Algonquian village of Pomeiock.Before Europeans came into contact, most Algonquian settlements lived by hunting and fishing, although quite a few supplemented their diet by cultivating corn, beans and squash (the "Three Sisters"). The Ojibwe
Ojibwe
cultivated wild rice[citation needed]. The Algonquians of New England
New England
(who spoke the Eastern Algonquian) practiced a seasonal economy. The basic social unit was the village: a few hundred people related by a clan kinship structure
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Ojibwa
The Ojibwe, Ojibwa, or Chippewa are an Anishinaabeg
Anishinaabeg
group of Indigenous Peoples in North America
North America
known internally as Turtle Island. They live in Canada
Canada
and the United States
United States
and are one of the largest Indigenous ethnic groups north of the Rio Grande. In Canada, they are the second-largest First Nations
First Nations
population, surpassed only by the Cree. In the United States, they have the fifth-largest population among Native American tribes, surpassed only by the Navajo, Cherokee, Choctaw
Choctaw
and Lakota-Dakota-Nakota people. The Ojibwe
Ojibwe
people traditionally have spoken the Ojibwe
Ojibwe
language, a branch of the Algonquian language family
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Cree
The Cree
Cree
(Cree: Nēhiyaw; French: Cri) are one of the largest groups of First Nations
First Nations
in North America, with over 200,000 members living in Canada. The major proportion of Cree
Cree
in Canada
Canada
live north and west of Lake Superior, in Ontario, Manitoba, Saskatchewan, Alberta
Alberta
and the Northwest Territories. About 38,000 live in Quebec.[1] In the United States, this Algonquian-speaking people historically lived from Lake Superior
Lake Superior
westward
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Algonquin People
The Algonquins are indigenous inhabitants of North America
North America
who speak the Algonquin language, a divergent dialect of the Ojibwe
Ojibwe
language, which is part of the Algonquian language family.[1] Culturally and linguistically, they are closely related to the Odawa
Odawa
and Ojibwe, with whom they form the larger Anicinàpe (Anishinaabe) grouping
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Iroquoian
The Iroquoian languages
Iroquoian languages
are a language family of indigenous peoples of North America. They are known for their general lack of labial consonants. The Iroquoian languages
Iroquoian languages
are polysynthetic and head-marking.[2] Today, all surviving Iroquoian languages
Iroquoian languages
except Cherokee in Oklahoma and Mohawk are severely endangered or critically endangered, with only a few elderly speakers remaining
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Petun
WikiProjectIndigenous North AmericansFirst NationsCommons WiktionaryInuitCommons WiktionaryMétisCommons Wiktionaryv t eThe Tabacco people, Tobacco nation,[1] the Petun, or Tionontati in their Iroquoian
Iroquoian
language, were a historical First Nations
First Nations
band government closely related to the Huron Confederacy (Wendat). Their homeland was located along the southwest edge of Georgian Bay
Georgian Bay
of Lake Huron, in the area immediately to the west of the Huron territory in Southern Ontario
Southern Ontario
of present-day Canada
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Wyandot People
The Wyandot people
Wyandot people
or Wendat, also called the Huron Nation and Huron people,[1][a] in most historic references are believed to have been the most populous confederacy of Iroquoian
Iroquoian
cultured indigenous peoples of North America. They traditionally spoke the Wyandot language, a Northern Iroquoian
Iroquoian
language and were believed to number over 30,000[1] at the time the first European trader-explorers made contact with them in the second decade of the 17th century. By the 15th century, the pre-contact Wyandots settled in the large area from the north shores of most of present-day Lake Ontario, northwards up to Georgian Bay
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Province Of Quebec (1763-1791)
The Province of Quebec
Quebec
was a colony in North America created by Great Britain after the Seven Years' War. During the war, Great Britain's forces conquered French Canada. As part of terms of the Treaty of Paris peace settlement, France gave up its claim to Canada. France negotiated to keep the small but very rich sugar island of Guadeloupe instead.[1] By Britain's Royal Proclamation of 1763, Canada
Canada
(part of New France) was renamed the Province of Quebec
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Henry Hudson
Henry Hudson
Henry Hudson
(c. 1565–1611) was an English sea explorer and navigator during the early 17th century, best known for his explorations of present-day Canada
Canada
and parts of the northeastern United States.[4] In 1607 and 1608, Hudson made two attempts on behalf of English merchants to find a rumored Northeast Passage
Northeast Passage
to Cathay
Cathay
(present-day China) via a route above the Arctic
Arctic
Circle
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First Nations In Ontario
WikiProjectIndigenous North AmericansFirst NationsCommons WiktionaryInuitCommons WiktionaryMétisCommons Wiktionaryv t e First Nations
First Nations
in Ontario
Ontario
constitute many nations. Common First Nations ethnicities in the province include the Anishinaabe, Haudenosaunee, and the Cree
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Samuel De Champlain
Samuel
Samuel
de Champlain (French: [samɥɛl də ʃɑ̃plɛ̃] born Samuel
Samuel
Champlain; on or before August 13, 1574[2][Note 2][Note 1] – December 25, 1635), "The Father of New France", was a French navigator, cartographer, draftsman, soldier, explorer, geographer, ethnologist, diplomat, and chronicler. He made from 21-29 trips across the Atlantic[3], and founded New France
New France
and Quebec City
Quebec City
on July 3, 1608
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Lake Huron
Lake Huron
Lake Huron
is one of the five Great Lakes
Great Lakes
of North America. Hydrologically, it comprises the easterly portion of Lake Michigan–Huron, having the same surface elevation as its westerly counterpart, to which it is connected by the 5-mile-wide (8.0 km), 20-fathom-deep (120 ft; 37 m) Straits of Mackinac. It is shared on the north and east by the Canadian province of Ontario
Ontario
and on the south and west by the state of Michigan
Michigan
in the United States. The name of the lake is derived from early French explorers who named it for the Huron people inhabiting the region. The Huronian glaciation was named due to evidence collected from Lake Huron region. The northern parts of the lake include the North Channel and Georgian Bay. Across the lake to the southwest is Saginaw Bay. The main inlet is the St
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