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History Of Michigan State University
The history of Michigan State University
Michigan State University
(MSU) dates back to 1855, when the Michigan Legislature
Michigan Legislature
established the Agricultural College of the State of Michigan in East Lansing, with 3 buildings, 5 faculty members and 63 male students. As the first agricultural college in the United States, the school served as a prototype for future land-grant institutions under the Morrill Act
Morrill Act
enacted during Abraham Lincoln's presidency. The school's first class graduated in 1861 right after the onset of the American Civil War. That same year, the Michigan Legislature approved a plan to allow the school to adopt a four-year curriculum and grant degrees comparable to those of the University of Michigan (U-M). In 1870, the College became co-educational and expanded its curriculum beyond agriculture into a broad array of coursework commencing with home economics for women students
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Charles E. St. John
Charles Edward St. John (March 15, 1857 – April 26, 1935) was an American astronomer. He was born in Allen, Michigan to Hiriam A. St. John and his wife Lois Bacon; the youngest of a family of four sons and two daughters. In 1873 he entered Michigan Normal College, then graduated at the age of 19. For the next ten years, he suffered from ill health. After recovering, he became a teacher at the college, and in 1887 he graduated with a B.S. from Michigan State Agricultural College. He performed two years of graduate study in electromagnetism at the University of Michigan, then earned an M.A. from Harvard University in 1893. He was awarded a John Tyndall Fellowship and studied for a year in Berlin before returning to earn his Ph.D. from Harvard in 1896. After teaching for a year at the University of Michigan, he became an associate professor of physics at Oberlin College. He made professor in 1899 and became Dean of the College of Arts and Science in 1907
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Cornell University
Cornell University
University
(/kɔːrˈnɛl/ kor-NEL) is a private and statutory Ivy League
Ivy League
research university located in Ithaca, New York. Founded in 1865 by Ezra Cornell
Ezra Cornell
and Andrew Dickson White,[7] the university was intended to teach and make contributions in all fields of knowledge—from the classics to the sciences, and from the theoretical to the applied. These ideals, unconventional for the time, are captured in Cornell's motto, a popular 1865 Ezra Cornell quotation: "I would found an institution where any person can find instruction in any study."[1] The university is broadly organized into seven undergraduate colleges and seven graduate divisions at its main Ithaca campus, with each college and division defining its own admission standards and academic programs in near autonomy
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Latin Language
Latin
Latin
(Latin: lingua latīna, IPA: [ˈlɪŋɡʷa laˈtiːna]) is a classical language belonging to the Italic branch of the Indo-European languages. The Latin alphabet
Latin alphabet
is derived from the Etruscan and Greek alphabets, and ultimately from the Phoenician alphabet. Latin
Latin
was originally spoken in Latium, in the Italian Peninsula.[3] Through the power of the Roman Republic, it became the dominant language, initially in Italy and subsequently throughout the Roman Empire. Vulgar Latin
Vulgar Latin
developed into the Romance languages, such as Italian, Portuguese, Spanish, French, and Romanian. Latin, Greek and French have contributed many words to the English language
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Greek Language
Greek (Modern Greek: ελληνικά [eliniˈka], elliniká, "Greek", ελληνική γλώσσα [eliniˈci ˈɣlosa] ( listen), ellinikí glóssa, "Greek language") is an independent branch of the Indo-European family of languages, native to Greece
Greece
and other parts of the Eastern Mediterranean
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Elitist
Elitism is the belief or attitude that individuals who form an elite — a select group of people with a certain ancestry, intrinsic quality, high intellect, wealth, special skills, or experience — are more likely to be constructive to society as a whole, and therefore deserve influence or authority greater than that of others. In the United States, the term elitism often refers to the concentration of power in the Northeast Corridor and on the West Coast, where the typical American elite resides – lawyers, doctors, high-level civil servants (such as White House
White House
aides), businesspeople, university lecturers, entrepreneurs, and financial advisors in the quaternary sector, often in established technological or political catchments of their higher education alma mater.[1] Alternatively, the term elitism may be used to describe a situation in which power is concentrated in the hands of a limited number of people
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Lieutenant Governor
A lieutenant governor, lieutenant-governor, or vice governor is a high officer of state, whose precise role and rank vary by jurisdiction.Often a lieutenant governor is the deputy or lieutenant to or ranking under a governor — a "second-in-command". In Canadian provinces
Canadian provinces
and in other Commonwealth realms,[citation needed] or in the Dutch Caribbean, the lieutenant governor is the representative of the monarch in that jurisdiction.[1]Contents1 Description 2
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Doctorate
A doctorate (from Latin
Latin
docere, "to teach") or doctor's degree (from Latin
Latin
doctor, "teacher") or doctoral degree (from the ancient formalism licentia docendi) is an academic degree awarded by universities that is, in most countries, a research degree that qualifies the holder to teach at the university level in the degree's field, or to work in a specific profession. There are a variety of doctoral degrees, with the most common being the Doctor of Philosophy (PhD), which is awarded in many different fields, ranging from the humanities to the scientific disciplines. In the United States and some other countries, there are also some types of vocational, technical, or professional degrees that are referred to as doctorates in their home countries, though they are not technically doctoral level as they are not research degrees and no defense of any dissertation or thesis is performed
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Morrill Land-Grant Colleges Act
The Morrill Land-Grant Acts
Morrill Land-Grant Acts
are United States
United States
statutes that allowed for the creation of land-grant colleges in U.S. states
U.S. states
using the proceeds of federal land sales. The Morrill Act of 1862 (7 U.S.C. § 301 et seq.) was enacted during the American Civil War and the Morrill Act of 1890 (the Agricultural College Act of 1890 (26 Stat. 417, 7 U.S.C. § 321 et seq.)) expanded this model.Contents1 Passage of original bill 2 Land-grant colleges 3 Expansion 4 Agricultural experiment stations and cooperative extension service 5 See also 6 References 7 External linksPassage of original bill[edit]Justin Smith MorrillFor 20 years prior to the first introduction of the bill in 1857, there was a political movement calling for the creation of agriculture colleges
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Theophilus C. Abbot
Theophilus Capen Abbot (April 29, 1826 – November 7, 1892) was born in Vassalboro, Maine, and spent his early life in Augusta, Maine. Life[edit] At the age of fifteen he entered Colby University (now Colby College) at Waterville, Maine. He graduated in 1845 and received his A.M. degree from Colby four years later. After receiving the A.M. degree, Abbot taught in Vermont, at the Bangor Theological Seminary
Bangor Theological Seminary
in Maine, at Colby University, in Berrien Springs, Michigan, and at the Union School in Ann Arbor. In 1858, Abbot accepted the Professorship of English Literature at the State Agricultural College (now Michigan State University). He also served as the treasurer of the college in 1860, and as secretary pro tempore of the State Board of Agriculture in 1861 and 1862
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Financial Endowment
A financial endowment is a donation of money or property to a nonprofit organization for the ongoing support of that organization. Usually the endowment is structured so that the principal amount is kept intact, while the investment income is available for use, or part of the principal is released each year, which allows for their donation to have an impact over a longer period than if it were spent all at once. An endowment may come with stipulations regarding its usage. The total value of an institution's investments is often referred to as the institution's endowment and is typically organized as a public charity, private foundation, or trust
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Andrew Dickson White
Mary A. Outwater (m. 1859–1888) Helen Magill18901918 Residence A.D. White House, Ithaca, New YorkAlma mater Yale College
Yale College
(A.B. in 1853, M.A in 1856)Signature Andrew Dickson White
Andrew Dickson White
(November 7, 1832 – November 4, 1918) was an American historian and educator, who was the cofounder of Cornell University and served as its first president for nearly two decades. He was known for expanding the scope of college curriculae.[3] A politician, he had served as state senator in New York
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Botany
Botany, also called plant science(s), plant biology or phytology, is the science of plant life and a branch of biology. A botanist, plant scientist or phytologist is a scientist who specialises in this field. The term "botany" comes from the Ancient Greek
Ancient Greek
word βοτάνη (botanē) meaning "pasture", "grass", or "fodder"; βοτάνη is in turn derived from βόσκειν (boskein), "to feed" or "to graze".[1][2][3] Traditionally, botany has also included the study of fungi and algae by mycologists and phycologists respectively, with the study of these three groups of organisms remaining within the sphere of interest of the International Botanical Congress
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Medical School
A medical school is a tertiary educational institution —or part of such an institution— that teaches medicine, and awards a professional degree for physicians and surgeons. Such medical degrees include the Bachelor of Medicine, Bachelor of Surgery (MBBS, MBChB, BMBS), Doctor of Medicine
Medicine
(MD), or Doctor of Osteopathic Medicine (DO). Many medical schools offer additional degrees, such as a Doctor of Philosophy, Master's degree, a physician assistant program, or other post-secondary education. Medical schools can also carry out medical research and operate teaching hospitals. Around the world, criteria, structure, teaching methodology, and nature of medical programs offered at medical schools vary considerably. Medical schools are often highly competitive, using standardized entrance examinations, as well as grade point average and leadership roles, to narrow the selection criteria for candidates
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Maize
Maize
Maize
(/meɪz/ MAYZ; Zea mays subsp. mays, from Spanish: maíz after Taíno mahiz), also known as corn, is a cereal grain first domesticated by indigenous peoples in southern Mexico[1][2] about 10,000 years ago. The leafy stalk of the plant produces separate pollen and ovuliferous inflorescences or ears, which are fruits, yielding kernels or seeds. Maize
Maize
has become a staple food in many parts of the world, with total production surpassing that of wheat or rice. However, not all of this maize is consumed directly by humans. Some of the maize production is used for corn ethanol, animal feed and other maize products, such as corn starch and corn syrup
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Cross-fertilization
Out-crossing or out-breeding is the practice of introducing unrelated genetic material into a breeding line. It increases genetic diversity, thus reducing the probability of an individual being subject to disease or genetic abnormalities. Outcrossing is now the norm of most purposeful animal breeding, contrary to what is commonly believed. The outcrossing breeder intends to remove the traits by using "new blood". With dominant traits, one can still see the expression of the traits and can remove those traits whether one outcrosses, line breeds or inbreds. With recessive traits, outcrossing allows for the recessive traits to migrate across a population. The outcrossing breeder then may have individuals that have many deleterious genes that may be expressed by subsequent inbreeding
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