HOME TheInfoList.com
Providing Lists of Related Topics to Help You Find Great Stuff

picture info

History Of Earth
The history of Earth
Earth
concerns the development of planet Earth
Earth
from its formation to the present day.[1][2] Nearly all branches of natural science have contributed to understanding of the main events of Earth's past, characterized by constant geological change and biological evolution. The geological time scale (GTS), as defined by international convention,[3] depicts the large spans of time from the beginning of the Earth
Earth
to the present, and its divisions chronicle some definitive events of Earth
Earth
history. (In the graphic: Ga means "billion years ago"; Ma, "million years ago".) Earth
Earth
formed around 4.54 billion years ago, approximately one-third the age of the universe, by accretion from the solar nebula.[4][5][6] Volcanic outgassing probably created the primordial atmosphere and then the ocean, but the early atmosphere contained almost no oxygen
[...More...]

picture info

Creation Myth
A creation myth (or cosmogonic myth) is a symbolic narrative of how the world began and how people first came to inhabit it.[2][3][4] While in popular usage the term myth often refers to false or fanciful stories, members of cultures often ascribe varying degrees of truth to their creation myths.[5][6] In the society in which it is told, a creation myth is usually regarded as conveying profound truths, metaphorically, symbolically and sometimes in a historical or literal sense.[7][8] They are commonly, although not always, considered cosmogonical myths – that is, they describe the ordering of the cosmos from a state of chaos or amorphousness.[9] Creation myths often share a number of features
[...More...]

picture info

Miocene
The Miocene
Miocene
( /ˈmaɪəˌsiːn/[2][3]) is the first geological epoch of the Neogene
Neogene
Period and extends from about 23.03 to 5.333 million years ago (Ma). The Miocene
Miocene
was named by Charles Lyell; its name comes from the Greek words μείων (meiōn, “less”) and καινός (kainos, “new”)[4][5] and means "less recent" because it has 18% fewer modern sea invertebrates than the Pliocene.[6] The Miocene
Miocene
is preceded by the Oligocene
Oligocene
and is followed by the Pliocene. As the earth went from the Oligocene
Oligocene
through the Miocene
Miocene
and into the Pliocene, the climate slowly cooled towards a series of ice ages
[...More...]

picture info

Multicellular Organism
Multicellular organisms are organisms that consist of more than one cell, in contrast to unicellular organisms.[1] All species of animals, land plants and most fungi are multicellular, as are many algae, whereas a few organisms are partially uni- and partially multicellular, like slime molds and social amoebae such as the genus Dictyostelium. Multicellular organisms arise in various ways, for example by cell division or by aggregation of many single cells.[2] Colonial organisms are the result of many identical individuals joining together to form a colony
[...More...]

picture info

Greenland
Greenland
Greenland
(Greenlandic: Kalaallit
Kalaallit
Nunaat, pronounced [kalaːɬit nunaːt]; Danish: Grønland, pronounced [ˈɡʁɶnˌlanˀ]) is an autonomous constituent country within the Kingdom of Denmark
Kingdom of Denmark
between the Arctic
Arctic
and Atlantic Oceans, east of the Canadian Arctic Archipelago
[...More...]

Metasediment
In geology, metasedimentary rock is a type of metamorphic rock. Such a rock was first formed through the deposition and solidification of sediment. Then, the rock was buried underneath subsequent rock and was subjected to high pressures and temperatures, causing the rock to recrystallize. The overall composition of a metasedimentary rock can be used to identify the original sedimentary rock, even where they have been subject to high-grade metamorphism and intense deformation.[1] Types of metasedimentary rocks[edit]Sedimentary rock Metamorphic equivalentPure Limestone Marble[2]Impure (Silica or clay-rich) Limestone Calc–silicate rock[2]Mudstone PeliteSiltstone Semi-peliteSandstone Psammite, Quartzite[2]Conglomerate MetaconglomerateShale SlateSee also[edit]Metavolcanic rockReferences[edit]^ Vernon, R.H. & Clarke, G.L. 2008. Principles of metamorphic petrology, Cambridge University Press, 460pp. ^ a b c Arndt, Nicholas (2011)
[...More...]

picture info

Graphite
Graphite
Graphite
(/ˈɡræfaɪt/), archaically referred to as plumbago, is a crystalline form of the element carbon with its atoms arranged in a hexagonal structure. It occurs naturally in this form and is the most stable form of carbon under standard conditions. Under high pressures and temperatures it converts to diamond. Graphite
Graphite
is used in pencils and lubricants. Its high conductivity makes it useful in electronic products such as electrodes, batteries, and solar panels
[...More...]

Biogenic Substance
A biogenic substance is a substance produced by life processes. It may be either constituents, or secretions, of plants or animals. A more specific name for these substances is biomolecules.Contents1 Examples 2 Abiogenic (Opposite) 3 See also 4 ReferencesExamples[edit] Coal
Coal
and oil are possible examples of constituents which may have undergone changes over geologic time periods. Chalk
Chalk
and limestone are examples of secretions (marine animal shells) which are of geologic age. grass and wood are biogenic constituents of contemporary origin. Pearls, silk and ambergris are examples of secretions of contemporary origin.Abiogenic (Opposite)[edit] An abiogenic substance or process does not result from the present or past activity of living organisms. Abiogenic products may, e.g., be minerals, other inorganic compounds, as well as simple organic compounds (e.g
[...More...]

picture info

Western Australia
Western Australia[a] (abbreviated as WA) is a state occupying the entire western third of Australia. It is bounded by the Indian Ocean to the north and west, the Great Australian Bight
Great Australian Bight
and Southern Ocean to the south,[b] the Northern Territory
Northern Territory
to the north-east and South Australia
Australia
to the south-east. Western Australia
Australia
is Australia's largest state, with a total land area of 2,529,875 square kilometres (976,790 sq mi), and the second-largest country subdivision in the world, surpassed only by Russia's Sakha Republic
[...More...]

picture info

Sandstone
Sandstone
Sandstone
is a clastic sedimentary rock composed mainly of sand-sized (0.0625 to 2 mm) mineral particles or rock fragments. Most sandstone is composed of quartz or feldspar because they are the most resistant minerals to weathering processes at the Earth's surface, as seen in Bowen's reaction series. Like uncemented sand, sandstone may be any color due to impurities within the minerals, but the most common colors are tan, brown, yellow, red, grey, pink, white, and black. Since sandstone beds often form highly visible cliffs and other topographic features, certain colors of sandstone have been strongly identified with certain regions. Rock formations that are primarily composed of sandstone usually allow the percolation of water and other fluids and are porous enough to store large quantities, making them valuable aquifers and petroleum reservoirs
[...More...]

picture info

Fossil
A fossil (from Classical Latin
Latin
fossilis; literally, "obtained by digging")[1] is any preserved remains, impression, or trace of any once-living thing from a past geological age. Examples include bones, shells, exoskeletons, stone imprints of animals or microbes, hair, petrified wood, oil, coal, and DNA
DNA
remnants. The totality of fossils is known as the fossil record. Paleontology
Paleontology
is the study of fossils: their age, method of formation, and evolutionary significance. Specimens are usually considered to be fossils if they are over 10,000 years old.[2] The oldest fossils are from around 3.48 billion years old[3][4][5] to 4.1 billion years old.[6][7] The observation in the 19th century that certain fossils were associated with certain rock strata led to the recognition of a geological timescale and the relative ages of different fossils
[...More...]

picture info

Hydrosphere
The hydrosphere (from Greek ὕδωρ hydōr, "water"[1] and σφαῖρα sphaira, "sphere"[2]) is the combined mass of water found on, under, and above the surface of a planet, minor planet or natural satellite. It has been estimated that there are 1386 million cubic kilometers of water on Earth.[3] This includes water in liquid and frozen forms in groundwater, oceans, lakes and streams. Saltwater accounts for 97.5% of this amount. Fresh water
Fresh water
accounts for only 2.5%. Of this fresh water, 68.9% is in the form of ice and permanent snow cover in the Arctic, the Antarctic, and mountain glaciers. 30.8% is in the form of fresh groundwater. Only 0.3% of the fresh water on Earth
Earth
is in easily accessible lakes, reservoirs and river systems.[3] The total mass of the Earth's hydrosphere is about 1.4 × 1018 tonnes, which is about 0.023% of Earth's total mass
[...More...]

picture info

Eoarchean
The Eoarchean
Eoarchean
( /ˌiːoʊ.ɑːrˈkiːən/; also spelled Eoarchaean) is the first era of the Archean
Archean
Eon of the geologic record for which the Earth has a solid crust. It spans 400 million years from the end of the Hadean
Hadean
Eon 4 billion years ago (4000 Mya) to the start of the Paleoarchean
Paleoarchean
Era 3600 Mya. The beginnings of life on Earth have been dated to this era and evidence of cyanobacteria date to 3500 Mya, just outside this era
[...More...]

picture info

Earliest Known Life Forms
The earliest known life forms on Earth
Earth
are putative fossilized microorganisms found in hydrothermal vent precipitates.[1] The earliest time that life forms first appeared on Earth
Earth
is unknown
[...More...]

picture info

Species
In biology, a species (/ˈspiːʃiːz/ // (listen)) is the basic unit of classification and a taxonomic rank of an organism, as well as a unit of biodiversity. A species is often defined as the largest group of organisms in which any two individuals of the appropriate sexes or mating types can produce fertile offspring, typically by sexual reproduction. Other ways of defining species include their karyotype, DNA
DNA
sequence, morphology, behaviour or ecological niche. In addition, paleontologists use the concept of the chronospecies since fossil reproduction cannot be examined. While these definitions may seem adequate, when looked at more closely they represent problematic species concepts. For example, the boundaries between closely related species become unclear with hybridisation, in a species complex of hundreds of similar microspecies, and in a ring species
[...More...]

picture info

Quaternary
Quaternary
Quaternary
( /kwəˈtɜːrnəri/) is the current and most recent of the three periods of the Cenozoic
Cenozoic

[...More...]

.