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Historic Counties Of England
The historic counties of England
England
are areas that were established for administration by the Normans, in most cases based on earlier kingdoms and shires established by the Anglo-Saxons
Anglo-Saxons
and others
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Kingdom Of Powys
The Kingdom of Powys
Powys
was a Welsh successor state, petty kingdom and principality that emerged during the Middle Ages
Middle Ages
following the end of Roman rule in Britain. It very roughly covered the top two thirds of the modern county of Powys
Powys
and part of the West Midlands (see map). More precisely, and based on the Romano-British tribal lands of the Ordovices
Ordovices
in the west and the Cornovii in the east, its boundaries originally extended from the Cambrian Mountains
Cambrian Mountains
in the west to include the modern West Midlands region of England in the east
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Parish
A parish is a church territorial entity constituting a division within a diocese. A parish is under the pastoral care and clerical jurisdiction of a parish priest, who might be assisted by one or more curates, and who operates from a parish church. Historically, a parish often covered the same geographical area as a manor. Its association with the parish church remains paramount.[1] By extension the term parish refers not only to the territorial entity but to the people of its community or congregation as well as to church property within it
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Roman Britain
Roman Britain
Roman Britain
(Latin: Britannia
Britannia
or, later, Britanniae, "the Britains") was the area of the island of Great Britain
Great Britain
that was governed by the Roman Empire, from 43 to 410 AD.[1]:129–131[2]
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Great Britain
Great Britain, also known as Britain, is a large island in the north Atlantic Ocean off the northwest coast of continental Europe. With an area of 209,331 km2 (80,823 sq mi), Great Britain is the largest of the British Isles, the largest European island, and the ninth-largest island in the world.[5][note 1] In 2011 the island had a population of about 61 million people, making it the world's third-most populous island after Java in Indonesia and Honshu in Japan.[7][8] The island of Ireland is situated to the west of it, and together these islands, along with over 1,000 smaller surrounding islands, form the British Isles archipelago.[9] The island is dominated by a maritime climate with quite narrow temperature differences between seasons. Politically, the island is part of the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern Ireland, and constitutes most of its territory.[10] Most of England, Scotland, and Wales are on the island
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Duke Of Devonshire
Duke of Devonshire
Devonshire
is a title in the Peerage of England held by members of the Cavendish family
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Northamptonshire
Coordinates: 52°17′N 0°50′W / 52.283°N 0.833°W / 52.283; -0.833NorthamptonshireCountyFlag Coat of armsMotto: Rosa concordiae signum[1] The rose, emblem of harmony Northamptonshire
Northamptonshire
in EnglandSovereign state United KingdomCountry EnglandRegion East MidlandsCeremonial countyLord Lieutenant David Laing[2]High Sheriff Rupert Fordham[3]Area 2,364 km2 (913 sq mi) • Ranked 24th of 48Population (mid-2016 est.) 733,100 • Ranke
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Norman Conquest Of England
The Norman conquest of England
England
(in Britain, often called the Norman Conquest or the Conquest) was the 11th-century invasion and occupation of England
England
by an army of Norman, Breton, and French soldiers led by Duke William II of Normandy, later styled William the Conqueror. William's claim to the English throne derived from his familial relationship with the childless Anglo-Saxon King Edward the Confessor, who may have encouraged William's hopes for the throne. Edward died in January 1066 and was succeeded by his brother-in-law Harold Godwinson. The Norwegian king Harald Hardrada
Harald Hardrada
invaded northern England
England
in September 1066 and was victorious at the Battle of Fulford, but Harold defeated and killed him at the Battle of Stamford Bridge
Battle of Stamford Bridge
on 25 September. Within days, William landed in southern England
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Bishop Of Durham
The Bishop
Bishop
of Durham is the Anglican bishop responsible for the Diocese of Durham
Diocese of Durham
in the Province of York. The diocese is one of the oldest in England and its bishop is a member of the House of Lords. Paul Butler has been the Bishop
Bishop
of Durham since his election was confirmed at York Minster
York Minster
on 20 January 2014.[1] The previous bishop was Justin Welby, Archbishop of Canterbury. The bishop is one of two (the other is the Bishop
Bishop
of Bath and Wells) who escort the sovereign at the coronation. He is officially styled The Right Reverend Father in God, (Christian Name), by Divine Providence Lord Bishop
Bishop
of Durham, but this full title is rarely used. In signatures, the bishop's family name is replaced by Dunelm, from the Latin name for Durham (the Latinised form of Old English Dunholm)
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Diocese
The word diocese (/ˈdaɪəsɪs, -siːs, -siːz/)[a] is derived from the Greek term διοίκησις meaning "administration". When now used in an ecclesiastical sense, it refers to an administrative territorial entity.[2] In the Western Church, the district is under the supervision of a bishop (who may have assistant bishops to help him or her) and is divided into parishes under the care of priests; but in the Eastern Church, the word denotes the area under the jurisdiction of a patriarch and the bishops under his jurisdiction administer parishes.[2] This structure of church governance is known as episcopal polity. The word diocesan means relating or pertaining to a diocese. It can also be used as a noun meaning the bishop who has the principal supervision of a diocese
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Jutes
The Jutes
Jutes
(/dʒuːts/), Iuti, or Iutæ were a Germanic people. According to Bede,[1] the Jutes
Jutes
were one of the three most powerful Germanic peoples
Germanic peoples
of their time in the Nordic Iron Age,[2][3] the other two being the Saxons
Saxons
and the Angles.[4][5] The Jutes
Jutes
are believed to have originated from the Jutland
Jutland
Peninsula (called Iutum in Latin) and part of the North Frisian coast. In present times, the Jutlandic Peninsula consists of the mainland of Denmark
Denmark
and Southern Schleswig
Southern Schleswig
in Germany
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Local Government In England
The pattern of local government in England
England
is complex, with the distribution of functions varying according to the local arrangements. Legislation concerning local government in England
England
is decided by the Parliament and Government of
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Administration Of Justice
The administration of justice is the process by which the legal system of a government is executed. The presumed goal of such administration is to provide justice for all those accessing the legal system. The phrase is also used commonly to describe a University degree (as in: a BA in Administration of Justice), which can be a prerequisite for a job in law enforcement or government.[1]Contents1 Australia 2 Canada2.1 Ontario3 Republic of Ireland 4 United Kingdom 5 Quotes 6 See also 7 References 8 Bibliography 9 External linksAustralia[edit] In Attorney General for New South Wales
New South Wales
v Love, the appellant argued that section 24 of the Act 9 Geo 4 c 83 did not have the effect applying the Nullum Tempus Act
Nullum Tempus Act
(9 Geo 3 c 16) (1768) to New South Wales
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Justice Of The Peace
A justice of the peace (JP) is a judicial officer, of a lower or puisne court, elected or appointed by means of a commission (letters patent) to keep the peace. In past centuries the term commissioner of the peace was often used with the same meaning. Depending on the jurisdiction, such justices dispense summary justice or merely deal with local administrative applications in common law jurisdictions. Justices of the peace are appointed or elected from the citizens of the jurisdiction in which they serve, and are (or were) usually not required to have any formal legal education in order to qualify for the office
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List Of County Days In England
England is a country that is part of the United Kingdom.[6][7][8] It shares land borders with Scotland to the north and Wales to the west. The Irish Sea lies northwest of England and the Celtic Sea lies to the southwest. England is separated from continental Europe by the North Sea to the east and the English Channel to the south. The country covers five-eighths of the island of Great Britain, which lies in the North Atlantic, and includes over 100 smaller islands, such as the Isles of Scilly and the Isle of Wight. The area now called England was first inhabited by modern humans during the Upper Palaeolithic period, but takes its name from the Angles, a Germanic tribe deriving its name from the Anglia peninsula, who settled during the 5th and 6th centuries
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Anglo-Saxons
The Anglo- Saxons
Saxons
were a people who inhabited Great Britain
Great Britain
from the 5th century. They comprise people from Germanic tribes
Germanic tribes
who migrated to the island from continental Europe, their descendants, and indigenous British groups who adopted some aspects of Anglo-Saxon
Anglo-Saxon
culture and language. Historically, the Anglo-Saxon
Anglo-Saxon
period denotes the period in Britain between about 450 and 1066, after their initial settlement and up until the Norman conquest.[1] The early Anglo-Saxon
Anglo-Saxon
period includes the creation of an English nation, with many of the aspects that survive today, including regional government of shires and hundreds. During this period, Christianity was established and there was a flowering of literature and language
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