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Historia Norvegiæ
Historia Norwegiæ is a short history of Norway
Norway
written in Latin by an anonymous monk. The only extant manuscript is in the private possession of the Earl of Dalhousie, and is kept at Brechin Castle, Scotland. However, the manuscript itself is fragmented; the Historia itself is in folios 1r-12r. Recent dating efforts place it somewhere c. 1500-1510A.<[1] The original text appears to have been written earlier than the manuscript itself; the text refers to both a volcanic eruption and an earthquake in 1211 as contemporary events,[2] and Orkney
Orkney
is stated to be under Norwegian rule.Contents1 Contents 2 Notable 3 Dates 4 References 5 Sources 6 External linksContents[edit] Historia Norwegiæ consists of three parts:I. A short geographical survey of Norway
Norway
and its dominions, followed by a brief history of Norway II. Genealogy of the Earls of Orkney III
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Norway
Indigenous status:Sami[3]Minority status:[4]Jewish Traveller Forest Finn Romani KvenReligion LutheranDemonym Norwegian (Nordmann)Government Unitary parliamentary constitutional monarchy• MonarchHarald V• Prime MinisterErna Solberg• President of the StortingTone W. Trøen• Chief JusticeToril Marie ØieLegislature StortingHistory• State established prior unification872•  Norwegian Empire
Norwegian Empire
(Greatest indep
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Monk
A monk (/mʌŋk/, from Greek: μοναχός, monachos, "single, solitary" and Latin
Latin
monachus[1]) is a person who practices religious asceticism by monastic living, either alone or with any number of other monks. A monk may be a person who decides to dedicate his life to serving all other living beings, or to be an ascetic who voluntarily chooses to leave mainstream society and live his or her life in prayer and contemplation. The concept is ancient and can be seen in many religions and in philosophy. In the Greek language
Greek language
the term can apply to women, but in modern English it is mainly in use for men. The word nun is typically used for female monastics. Although the term monachos is of Christian
Christian
origin, in the English language monk tends to be used loosely also for both male and female ascetics from other religious or philosophical backgrounds
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Nordisk Familjebok
Nordisk familjebok
Nordisk familjebok
(Swedish: [ˈnuːɖɪsk faˈmɪljəˈbuːk], Nordic Family Book) is a Swedish encyclopedia that was published in print form between 1876 and 1957, and that is now fully available in digital form via Project Runeberg at Linköping University.Contents1 History1.1 Print editions2 Further reading 3 See also 4 References 5 External linksHistory[edit] Print editions[edit] The first edition of Nordisk familjebok
Nordisk familjebok
was published in 20 volumes between 1876 and 1899, and is known as the " Idun
Idun
edition" because it bears a picture of Idun, the Norse mythologic goddess of spring and rejuvenation, on its cover.[1][2] This was published during almost a quarter of a century, and particularly the first ten volumes contain material which are not seen in later editions
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Special
Special
Special
or specials may refer to:Contents1 Music 2 Film and television 3 Other uses 4 See alsoMusic[edit] Special
Special
(album), a 1992
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International Standard Book Number
"ISBN" redirects here. For other uses, see ISBN (other).International Standard Book
Book
NumberA 13-digit ISBN, 978-3-16-148410-0, as represented by an EAN-13 bar codeAcronym ISBNIntroduced 1970; 48 years ago (1970)Managing organisation International ISBN AgencyNo. of digits 13 (formerly 10)Check digit Weighted sumExample 978-3-16-148410-0Website www.isbn-international.orgThe International Standard Book
Book
Number (ISBN) is a unique[a][b] numeric commercial book identifier. Publishers purchase ISBNs from an affiliate of the International ISBN Agency.[1] An ISBN is assigned to each edition and variation (except reprintings) of a book. For example, an e-book, a paperback and a hardcover edition of the same book would each have a different ISBN. The ISBN is 13 digits long if assigned on or after 1 January 2007, and 10 digits long if assigned before 2007
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Peter Andreas Munch
Peter Andreas Munch
Peter Andreas Munch
(15 December 1810 – 25 May 1863), usually known as P. A. Munch, was a Norwegian historian, known for his work on the medieval history of Norway. Munch’s scholarship included Norwegian archaeology, geography, ethnography, linguistics, and jurisprudence. He was also noted for his Norse legendary saga translations.Contents1 Background 2 Career 3 The chronicle of Man and The Sudreys 4 Controversial views about the Finno-Ugric peoples 5 Selected works 6 Sources 7 External linksBackground[edit] Peter Andreas Munch
Peter Andreas Munch
was born in Christiania (now Oslo). He was the son of Edvard Storm Munch and Johanne Sophie Hofgaard. Munch was the uncle of the famous painter Edvard Munch. Munch grew up at Gjerpen
Gjerpen
parsonage, where his father was parish priest of the Church of Norway. He was schooled in the city of Skien. He attended the Royal Frederick University
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Theodoric The Monk
Theodoric the Monk (Latin: Theodoricus monachus; also Tjodrik munk; in Old Norse his name was most likely Þórir[1]) was a 12th-century Norwegian Benedictine monk, perhaps at the Nidarholm Abbey. He may be identical with either Bishop Tore of the Diocese of Hamar or Archbishop Tore Gudmundsson, of the Archdiocese of Nidaros
Archdiocese of Nidaros
who both went under the Latin
Latin
name Theodoricus in the Abbey of St. Victor, Paris.[1]Contents1 Biography 2 See also 3 References 4 Bibliography 5 Related Reading 6 External linksBiography[edit] Theodoric wrote a brief history of the kings of Norway in Latin, Historia de Antiquitate Regum Norwagiensium sometime between 1177 and 1188. The work covers Norwegian history from the reign of the 9th century King Haraldr hárfagri
Haraldr hárfagri
up to the death of King Sigurðr Jórsalafari in 1130
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Sami People
The Sami people
Sami people
(also known as the Sámi or the Saami) are a Finno-Ugric people inhabiting Sápmi, which today encompasses large parts of Norway
Norway
and Sweden, northern parts of Finland, and the Murmansk Oblast
Murmansk Oblast
of Russia. The Sami have historically been known in English as the Lapps or the Laplanders, but these terms can be perceived as derogatory.[6] Sami ancestral lands are not well-defined. Their traditional languages are the Sami languages
Sami languages
and are classified as a branch of the Uralic language family. Traditionally, the Sami have pursued a variety of livelihoods, including coastal fishing, fur trapping, and sheep herding. Their best-known means of livelihood is semi-nomadic reindeer herding. Currently about 10% of the Sami are connected to reindeer herding, providing them with meat, fur, and transportation
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Shamanism
Shamanism
Shamanism
is a practice that involves a practitioner reaching altered states of consciousness in order to perceive and interact with a spirit world and channel these transcendental energies into this world.[1] A shaman (/ˈʃɑːmən/ SHAH-men) is someone who is regarded as having access to, and influence in, the world of benevolent and malevolent spirits, who typically enters into a trance state during a ritual, and practices divination and healing.[2] The word "shaman" probably originates from the Tungusic
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Heimskringla
Heimskringla
Heimskringla
(Icelandic pronunciation: ​[ˈheimsˌkʰriŋla]) is the best known of the Old Norse
Old Norse
kings' sagas. It was written in Old Norse in Iceland
Iceland
by the poet and historian Snorri Sturluson (1178/79–1241) ca. 1230. The name Heimskringla
Heimskringla
was first used in the 17th century, derived from the first two words of one of the manuscripts (kringla heimsins, "the circle of the world"). Heimskringla
Heimskringla
is a collection of sagas about the Norwegian kings, beginning with the saga of the legendary Swedish dynasty of the Ynglings, followed by accounts of historical Norwegian rulers from Harald Fairhair
Harald Fairhair
of the 9th century up to the death of the pretender Eystein Meyla
Eystein Meyla
in 1177
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Þjóðólfr Of Hvinir
Þjóðólfr of Hvinir [Thjodolf] (c.855–930) was a Norwegian skald.[1] He is considered to have been the original author of Ynglingatal, a poem glorifying the Norwegian petty king Ragnvald the Mountain-High, by describing how he was descended from the Swedish kings and the Norse gods. He is also credited with another skaldic poem, Haustlöng.[1] References[edit]^ a b  Gilman, D. C.; Peck, H. T.; Colby, F. M., eds. (1905). "Norwegian Literature". New International Encyclopedia
New International Encyclopedia
(1st ed.)
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Orkney
Orkney
Orkney
/ˈɔːrkni/ (Old Norse: Orkneyjar, Pictish: Insi Orc, "islands of the pigs"), also known as the Orkney
Orkney
Islands,[Notes 1] is an archipelago in the Northern Isles
Northern Isles
of Scotland, situated off the north coast of Great Britain. Orkney
Orkney
is 16 kilometres (10 mi) north of the coast of Caithness
Caithness
and comprises approximately 70 islands, of which 20 are inhabited.[2][3][4] The largest island, Mainland, is often referred to as "the Mainland"
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Scotland
Scotland
Scotland
(/ˈskɒtlənd/; Scots: [ˈskɔtlənd]; Scottish Gaelic: Alba
Alba
[ˈal̪ˠapə] ( listen)) is a country that is part of the United Kingdom
United Kingdom
and covers the northern third of the island of Great Britain.[16][17][18] It shares a border with England
England
to the south, and is otherwise surrounded by the Atlantic Ocean, with the North Sea
North Sea
to the east and the North Channel and Irish Sea
Irish Sea
to the south-west. In addition to the mainland, the country is made up of more than 790 islands,[19] including the Northern Isles
Northern Isles
and the Hebrides. The Kingdom of Scotland
Kingdom of Scotland
emerged as an independent sovereign state in the Early Middle Ages
Early Middle Ages
and continued to exist until 1707
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Brechin Castle
Brechin
Brechin
Castle is a castle located in Brechin, Angus, Scotland. The castle is the seat of the Earl of Dalhousie, who is the clan chieftain of Clan Maule of Panmure in Angus, and Clan Ramsay
Clan Ramsay
of Dalhousie in Midlothian. The original castle was constructed in stone during the 13th century. Most of the current building dates to the early 18th century, when extensive reconstruction was carried out by architect Alexander Edward for James Maule, 4th Earl of Panmure, between approximately 1696 and 1709.[1] The grounds have been in the Maule-Ramsay family since the 12th century. The castle has been the seat of the Clan Maule since medieval times. The Maule and Ramsay clans were joined under a single chieftain in the 18th century
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Earl Of Dalhousie
Earl of Dalhousie, in the County of Midlothian, is a title in the Peerage of Scotland, held by the Chief of Clan Ramsay.Contents1 History 2 Lords Ramsay of Dalhousie (1618) 3 Earls of Dalhousie (1633) 4 Marquesses of Dalhousie (1849) 5 Earls of Dalhousie (1633; Reverted) 6 See also 7 Notes 8 References 9 External linksHistory[edit] The family descends from Sir George Ramsay, who represented Kincardineshire in the Scottish Parliament in 1617. He received a charter of the barony of Dalhousie and also of the barony of Melrose on the resignation of John Ramsay, 1st Earl of Holderness. In 1618 he was raised to the Peerage of Scotland as Lord Ramsay of Melrose. However, as he did not like the title, he obtained a letter from James VI in 1619 to change it to Lord Ramsay of Dalhousie (with the precedence of 1618). He was succeeded by his eldest son, the second Lord
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