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Hisashi (architecture)
In Japanese architecture
Japanese architecture
the term hisashi (廂・庇) has two meanings:As more commonly used, the term indicates the eaves of a roof,[1] that is, the part along the edge of a roof projecting beyond the side of the building to provide protection against the weather. The term is however also used in a more specialized sense to indicate the area surrounding the moya (the core of a building) either completely or on one, two, or three sides.[1]It is common in Zen
Zen
Buddhist temples where it is a 1 ken wide aisle-like area and at the same level as the moya
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Haiden (Shinto)
Haiden may refer to:A Gewürztraminer
Gewürztraminer
wine The hall of worship of a Shinto shrine, see Haiden (Shinto)This disambiguation page lists articles associated with the title Haiden. If an internal link led you here, you may wish to change the link to point directly to the
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Kamakura, Kanagawa
Kamakura
Kamakura
(鎌倉市, Kamakura-shi) is a city in Kanagawa Prefecture, Japan. Although Kamakura
Kamakura
proper is today rather small, it is often described in history books as a former de facto capital of Japan
Japan
as the seat of the shogunate and of the Regency during the Kamakura period. Kamakura
Kamakura
was designated as a city on November 3, 1939. As of September 1, 2016, the modern city has an estimated population of 172,302, and a population density of 4,358.77 persons per km2
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Imperial Crown Style
The Imperial Crown Style
Imperial Crown Style
(帝冠様式, Teikanyōshiki) of Japanese architecture developed during the Japanese Empire
Japanese Empire
in the early twentieth century. The style is identified by Japanese-style roofing on top of Neoclassical styled buildings;[1] and can have a centrally elevated structure with a pyramidal dome. Outside of the Japanese mainland, Imperial Crown Style
Imperial Crown Style
architecture often included regional architectural elelements
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Special
Special
Special
or specials may refer to:Contents1 Music 2 Film and television 3 Other uses 4 See alsoMusic[edit] Special
Special
(album), a 1992 album by Vesta Williams "Special" (Garbage song), 1998 "Special
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International Standard Book Number
"ISBN" redirects here. For other uses, see ISBN (other).International Standard Book
Book
NumberA 13-digit ISBN, 978-3-16-148410-0, as represented by an EAN-13 bar codeAcronym ISBNIntroduced 1970; 48 years ago (1970)Managing organisation International ISBN AgencyNo. of digits 13 (formerly 10)Check digit Weighted sumExample 978-3-16-148410-0Website www.isbn-international.orgThe International Standard Book
Book
Number (ISBN) is a unique[a][b] numeric commercial book identifier. Publishers purchase ISBNs from an affiliate of the International ISBN Agency.[1] An ISBN is assigned to each edition and variation (except reprintings) of a book. For example, an e-book, a paperback and a hardcover edition of the same book would each have a different ISBN. The ISBN is 13 digits long if assigned on or after 1 January 2007, and 10 digits long if assigned before 2007
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Jaanus
Japanese Architecture and Art Net Users System or JAANUS is an online dictionary of Japanese architecture
Japanese architecture
and art terms compiled by Dr. Mary Neighbour Parent. It contains approximately eight thousand entries.[1][2] It is searchable in both English and romaji and contains many hyperlinks and illustrations.[3] See also[edit]JapanologyReferences[edit]^ "Art & archaeology reference sources". School of Oriental and African Studies. Archived from the original on 4 January 2013. Retrieved 5 August 2012.  ^ Parent, Mary Neighbour (1983). The Roof in Japanese Buddhist Architecture. Weatherhill. p. 348. ISBN 0-8348-0186-8.  ^ "Dictionaries". University of Washington. Retrieved 5 August 2012. External links[edit]JAANUSThis article related to art or architecture in Japan is a stub
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Kōjien
Kōjien
Kōjien
(Japanese: 広辞苑, lit. "Wide garden of words") is a single-volume Japanese dictionary first published by Iwanami Shoten
Iwanami Shoten
in 1955. It is widely regarded as the most authoritative dictionary of Japanese, and newspaper editorials frequently cite its definitions
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Himeji Castle
Himeji
Himeji
Castle (姫路城, Himeji-jō) is a hilltop Japanese castle complex located in the city of Himeji, Hyōgo, Japan. The castle is regarded as the finest surviving example of prototypical Japanese castle architecture, comprising a network of 83 buildings with advanced defensive systems from the feudal period.[7] The castle is frequently known as Hakuro-jō or Shirasagi-jō ("White Egret
Egret
Castle" or "White Heron
Heron
Castle") because of its brilliant white exterior and supposed resemblance to a bird taking flight.[6][8] Himeji
Himeji
Castle dates to 1333, when Akamatsu Norimura
Akamatsu Norimura
built a fort on top of Himeyama hill. The fort was dismantled and rebuilt as Himeyama Castle in 1346, and then remodeled into Himeji
Himeji
Castle two centuries later
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Lintel
A lintel or lintol is a structural horizontal block that spans the space or opening between two vertical supports.[1] It can be a decorative architectural element, or a combined ornamented structural item. It is often found over portals, doors, windows and fireplaces. Modern day lintels are made using prestressed concrete and are also referred to as beams in beam and block slabs or ribs in rib and block slabs. These prestressed concrete lintels and blocks are components that are packed together and propped to form a suspended floor concrete slab.Contents1 Structural uses 2 Ornamental uses 3 Examples gallery 4 See also 5 NotesStructural uses[edit] In worldwide architecture of different eras and many cultures, a lintel has been an element of post and lintel construction
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Zen
Zen
Zen
in JapanDōgen Hakuin EkakuSeon in KoreaTaego Bou Jinul Daewon Seongcheol Zen
Zen
in the USAD. T
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Eaves
The eaves are the edges of the roof which overhang the face of a wall and, normally, project beyond the side of a building.[1] The eaves form an overhang to throw water clear of the walls and may be highly decorated as part of an architectural style; such as the Chinese dougong bracket systems.Contents1 Etymology and usage 2 Function 3 Design 4 See also 5 References 6 External linksEtymology and usage[edit] Eaves
Eaves
is derived from Old English
Old English
efes meaning edge
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Hachiman-zukuri
The hachiman-zukuri (八幡造) is a traditional Japanese architectural style used at Hachiman
Hachiman
shrines in which two parallel structures with gabled roofs are interconnected on the non-gabled side, forming one building which, when seen from the side, gives the impression of two.[1] The front structure is called gaiden (外殿, outer sanctuary), the rear one naiden (内殿, inner sanctuary), and together they form the honden.[2][3] The honden itself is completely surrounded by a cloister-like covered corridor called kairō' (回廊) (see photo). Access is made possible by a gate called rōmon (楼門). It has a hirairi or hirairi-zukuri (平入・平入造) structure, that is, the building has its main entrance on the side which runs parallel to the roof's ridge (non gabled-side). There are entrances also at the center of the gabled sides (see image)
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Kasuga-zukuri
Kasuga-zukuri
Kasuga-zukuri
(春日造) is a traditional Shinto shrine
Shinto shrine
architectural style which takes its name from Kasuga Taisha's honden. It is characterized by the use of a building just 1x1 ken in size with the entrance on the gabled end covered by a veranda.[1][2] In Kasuga Taisha's case, the honden is just 1.9 m x 2.6 m.[3] Supporting structures are painted vermilion, while the plank walls are white.[3] It has a tsumairi (also called tsumairi-zukuri) (妻入・妻入造) structure, that is, the building has its main entrance on the gabled side.[3] The roof is gabled (kirizuma yane (切妻屋根, gabled roof)), decorated with purely ornamental poles called chigi (vertical) or katsuogi (horizontal), and covered with cypress bark.[3] After the nagare-zukuri style, this is the most common Shinto shrine style
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Kibitsu-zukuri
. Kibitsu-zukuri
Kibitsu-zukuri
(吉備津造), kibi-zukuri (吉備造) or hiyoku irimoya-zukuri (入母屋造, paired wing hip-and-gable roof style) is a traditional Japanese Shinto architectural style characterized by four dormer gables, two per lateral side, on the roof of a very large honden (sanctuary).[1] The gables are set at a right angle to the main roof ridge, and the honden is part of a single complex also including a haiden (worship hall)
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Taisha-zukuri
Taisha-zukuri
Taisha-zukuri
or Ōyashiro-zukuri (大社造) is the oldest Shinto shrine style. Named after Izumo Taisha's honden (sanctuary), like Ise Grand Shrine's shinmei-zukuri style it features a bark roof decorated with poles called chigi and katsuogi, plus archaic features like gable-end pillars and a single central pillar (shin no mihashira).[1] The honden's floor is raised above the ground through the use of stilts (see photo)
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