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Hippostratus Of Croton
The following is a list of winners of the Stadion race at the Olympic Games from 776 BC to 225 AD. It is based on the list given by Eusebius of Caesarea using a compilation by Sextus Julius Africanus . The Stadion race was the first and most important competition of the ancient Olympiads and the names of the winners are used by many Greek authors to date historic events
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Wrestling
WRESTLING is a combat sport involving grappling type techniques such as clinch fighting , throws and takedowns , joint locks , pins and other grappling holds . The sport can either be theatrical for entertainment, or genuinely competitive. A wrestling bout is a physical competition, between two (occasionally more) competitors or sparring partners, who attempt to gain and maintain a superior position . There are a wide range of styles with varying rules with both traditional historic and modern styles. Wrestling
Wrestling
techniques have been incorporated into other martial arts as well as military hand-to-hand combat systems. The term wrestling is attested in late Old English
Old English
, as wræstlunge (glossing palestram)
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Diodorus Siculus
DIODORUS SICULUS (/ˌdaɪəˈdɔːrəs ˈsɪkjʊləs/ ; Greek : Διόδωρος Σικελιώτης Diodoros Sikeliotes) (fl. 1st century BC) or DIODORUS OF SICILY was a Greek historian . He is known for writing the monumental universal history Bibliotheca historica , much of which survives, between 60 and 30 BC. It is arranged in three parts. The first covers mythic history up to the destruction of Troy
Troy
, arranged geographically, describing regions around the world from Egypt, India
India
and Arabia to Greece
Greece
and Europe. The second covers the Trojan War to the death of Alexander the Great
Alexander the Great
. The third covers the period to about 60 BC. Bibliotheca, meaning 'library', acknowledges that he was drawing on the work of many other authors
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364 BC
Year 364 BC was a year of the pre-Julian Roman calendar . At the time, it was known as the YEAR OF THE CONSULSHIP OF PETICUS AND CALVUS (or, less frequently, YEAR 390 AB URBE CONDITA ). The denomination 364 BC for this year has been used since the early medieval period, when the Anno Domini calendar era became the prevalent method in Europe for naming years. EVENTSBY PLACEGreece * On the advice of the city's military leader, Epaminondas , Thebes builds a fleet of 100 triremes to help combat Athens . Thebes destroys its Boeotian rival Orchomenus . * Philip II of Macedon , brother of the reigning king of Macedonia, returns to his native land after having been held as a hostage in Thebes since 369 BC . * The army of Thebes under their statesman and general, Pelopidas , defeats Alexander of Pherae in the Battle of Cynoscephalae in Thessaly , but Pelopidas is killed during the battle
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Olympiad
An OLYMPIAD (Greek : Ὀλυμπιάς, Olympiás) is a period of four years associated with the Olympic Games of the Ancient Greeks . During the Hellenistic period
Hellenistic period
, beginning with Ephorus , it was used as a calendar epoch . Converting to the modern BC/AD dating system the first Olympiad
Olympiad
began in the summer of 776 BC and lasted until the summer of 772 BC , when the second Olympiad
Olympiad
would begin with the commencement of the next games. By extrapolation to the Gregorian calendar , the 1st year of the 699th Olympiad
Olympiad
begins in (Northern-Hemisphere) mid-summer 2017. A modern Olympiad
Olympiad
refers to a four-year period beginning January 1 of a year in which the Summer Olympics are due to occur
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Anticles Of Athens
ANTICLES (ancient Greek Αντικλής), from Athens
Athens
, is listed as a victor in the stadion race of the 110th Olympiad
Olympiad
(340 BC). Eusebius of Caesarea refers his name as Anikles, but Diodorus Siculus
Diodorus Siculus
has Antikles
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Xenophon Of Corinth
XENOPHON OF CORINTH , son of Thessalus, was a victor at the Olympic Games , both in the foot-race and in the pentathlon , in the 79th Olympiad (464 BC). His family belonged to the stock of the Oligaethidae, and was one of the ruling families of Corinth. Pindar
Pindar
's 13th Olympic Ode celebrates his double victory. REFERENCES * The Extant Odes of Pindar
Pindar
translated by Ernest Myers , Page 69, ISBN 978-1-4353-8274-9 (2008) * Bockh and Dissen on Pindar, I. c. ; Diod. xi. 70 ; Paus. iv. 24. § 5, ed. Bekker ; Athen. xiii. p. 573 This article incorporates text from a publication now in the public domain : Smith, William , ed. (1870). "article name needed". Dictionary of Greek and Roman Biography and Mythology
Dictionary of Greek and Roman Biography and Mythology

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Dandes Of Argos
DANDES of Argos (Ancient Greek : Δάνδης Ἀργεῖος, transcr. Dandḗs Argeíos, "Dandes Argive") was an ancient Greek athlete listed by Eusebius of Caesarea as a victor in the stadion race of the 77th Olympiad (472 BC). He won two races, but the first was probably in the boys' category, maybe in the 75th Olympiad eight years earlier. He also won once at the Pythian Games and three times at the Nemean Games , according to some sources.; elsewhere, his victories were celebrated by Simonides of Ceos in a poem, which claims that he won fifteen times at Nemea – the discrepancy could again be due to victories in boys' races not recorded elsewhere
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Hagnon Of Peparethus
HAGNON of Peparethus was an ancient Greek athlete listed by Eusebius of Caesarea as a victor in the stadion race of the 53rd Olympiad (568 BC). He was the first winner from the Aegean Islands and the only winner from the Sporades
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Ladromus Of Laconia
LADROMUS of Laconia was an ancient Greek athlete listed by Eusebius of Caesarea as a victor in the stadion race of the 57th Olympiad (552 BC). He was the last Spartan runner during their period of dominance, winning the 21st title in 170 years. The next Spartan crown in the stadion race would be won more than 200 years later by Demosthenes of Laconia in 316 BC
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Phanas Of Pellene
PHANAS of Pellene was an ancient Greek athlete and Olympic winner listed by Eusebius of Caesarea
Eusebius of Caesarea
as a victor in the stadion race of the 65th Olympiad
Olympiad
(512 BC). He was the first to win all three races, the stadion race, the double race (Diaulos) and the race in full armour (Hopplitodromos)
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Astylos Of Croton
ASTYLOS OF CROTON (Ἄστυλος/Ἀστύαλος ὁ Κροτωνιάτης) was an athlete from ancient Croton who starred in the Olympic Games
Olympic Games
of the 5th century BC. He was mentioned in records from General Pausanias that claim he excelled in three successive Olympic games from 488 to 480 BC, in the running events of stade and diaulos . Diodorus Siculus
Diodorus Siculus
calls him Astylos of Syracuse and uses his third victory to date the Persian invasion in 480 BC.." Astylos won all his six wreaths in the Olympics. In Italy Astylos was famous for equaling the achievements of previous champion athlete Chionis of Sparta . Astylos not only matched the achievements of Chionis, in that he won on three separate occasions the stade and diaulos events, he also won the hoplitodromos event, which was a running race with full armored suits. Despite his fame, Astylos died a lonely man
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Ladas Of Aegium
LADAS of Aegium was an ancient Greek athlete listed by Eusebius of Caesarea as a victor in the stadion race of the 125th Olympiad (280 BC). REFERENCES * ^ Eusebius of Caesarea , Chronicle .SEE ALSOOlympic winners of the Stadion race This Ancient Greek biographical article is a stub . You can help by expanding it . * v * t * e This biographical article relating to Greek athletics is a stub . You can help by expanding it
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Philinus Of Cos (athlete)
PHILINUS OF COS (Greek : Φιλῖνος ὁ Κῷος; 3rd century BC), son of Hegepolis, was an ancient Greek athlete and five times Olympic winner. CAREERHe was a five-times Olympic winner in the stadion and diaulos running races (akin to the 200m and 400m sprints of modern Olympics). From then he reigned for over a decade in the stadia of Ancient Greece. In the 129th Olympiad in 264 BC he won in both the stadion and the diaulos; he repeated the feat at the 130th Olympiad in 260 BC where he also won in both the stadion and the diaulos. According to Mark Golden, his fifth victory may have the diaulos in 256 BC. Besides the Olympic games he had a total of 11 wins in the Isthmian games , four wins at the Pythian games , and another four wins at the Nemean games . In total he was victorious 24 times. LITERARY MENTIONHe appears in a poem by Theocritus , and is also mentioned by the geographer Pausanias and Eusebius
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Egypt
Coordinates : 26°N 30°E / 26°N 30°E / 26; 30 Arab Republic
Republic
of Egypt جمهورية مصر العربية * ARABIC : Jumhūrīyat Miṣr al-ʿArabīyah EGYPTIAN : Gomhoreyet Maṣr El ʿArabeyah Flag Coat of arms ANTHEM: " Bilady, Bilady, Bilady " "بلادي، بلادي، بلادي" "My country, my country, my country" Capital and largest
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Nero
NERO (/ˈnɪəroʊ/ ; Latin
Latin
: Nerō Claudius
Claudius
Caesar Augustus Germanicus) (15 December 37 AD – 9 June 68 AD) was the last emperor of the Julio-Claudian dynasty . He was adopted by his great-uncle Claudius
Claudius
and became Claudius' heir and successor. Like Claudius, Nero became emperor with the consent of the Praetorian Guard
Praetorian Guard
. Nero's mother, Agrippina the Younger , was implicated in Claudius' death and Nero's nomination as emperor. She dominated Nero's early life and decisions until he cast her off; five years into his reign, he had her murdered. During the early years of his reign, Nero
Nero
was content to be guided by his mother, his tutor Lucius Annaeus Seneca and his Praetorian prefect , Sextus Afranius Burrus
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