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Hindolasana In Eka Pada Prapadasana
Āsana is a generic term for postures used in the practice of yoga, derived from the Sanskrit
Sanskrit
word for 'seat'. While many of the oldest mentioned asanas are seated postures for meditation, asanas may be standing, seated, arm-balances, inversions, prone and supine postures as well. There is limited uniformity in naming postures since there are many competing schools of postural yoga
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Asana
DivisionsSamhita Brahmana Aranyaka UpanishadsUpanishads Rig vedicAitareya KaushitakiSama vedicChandogya KenaYajur vedicBrihadaranyaka Isha Taittiriya Katha Shvetashvatara MaitriAtharva vedicMundaka Mandukya PrashnaOther scripturesBhagavad Gita AgamasRelated Hindu textsVedangasShiksha Chandas Vyakarana Nirukta Kalpa JyotishaPuranas Brahma puranasBrahma Brahmānda Brahmavaivarta Markandeya BhavishyaVaishnava puranasVishnu Bhagavata Naradiya Garuda Padma Vamana Kurma MatsyaShaiva puranasShiva Linga Skanda Vayu AgniItihasaRamayana MahabharataShastras and sutrasDharma Shastra Artha Śastra Kamasutra Brahma Sutras Samkhya Sutras Mimamsa Sutras Nyāya Sūtras Vaiśeṣika Sūtra
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Bharadvājāsana
Spine - twist side: Internal obliques, erector spinae, splenius capitis Other side: External obliques, rotatores, multifidi sternocleidomastoidUsageLocation in Ashtanga Vinyasa series2nd series:before forward bends. before headstands.This article contains Indic text
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Ardha Ustrasana
Ardha ustrasana
Ardha ustrasana
(translated as Half-camel pose) is an asana (yoga position). The name of this pose comes from the Sanskrit word "ardha", meaning "half"; "ustra", meaning "camel"; and "asana", meaning "posture" or "seat".[1][2] It is a variation of ustrasana. Muscle groups and affected areas[edit] This pose has many benefits: it increases spinal flexibility, stimulates the internal organs, stretches the abdominals, the chest and the front of the shoulders
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Aṣṭāvakrāsana
Astavakrasana
Astavakrasana
(Sanskrit: अष्टावक्रासन; IAST: Aṣṭāvakrāsana) or Eight angled Pose[1] is an asana dedicated to the sage Astavakra, the spiritual guru of King Janaka. It is told that when the sage was in his mother's womb, his father Kagola made several mistakes while reciting the Vedas. Hearing these, the unborn sage laughed. The father became enraged and cursed his son to be born as Astavakra. So it came to pass that he was born crooked in eight places. These crooks earned him the name Ashtavakra
Ashtavakra
or Eight Crooks. Yet Kagola was later defeated in a philosophical debate with Vandin, the court scholar. While still a boy the sage, a natural scholar of great ability went to court and avenged his father's defeat by beating Vandin in argument and becoming the guru of Janaka
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Sanskrit
A few attempts at revival have been reported in Indian and Nepalese newspapers. India: 14,135 Indians claimed Sanskrit
Sanskrit
to be their mother tongue in the 2001 Census of India:[2] Nepal: 1,669 Nepalis
Nepalis
in 2011
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Baddha Koṇāsana
Baddha Konasana (/ˈbɑːdɑː koʊˈnɑːsɑːnɑː/ BAH-dah koh-NAH-sah-nah;[1] Sanskrit: बद्धकोणासन; IAST: baddhakoṇāsana), Bound Angle Pose,[2] or Cobbler Pose (after the typical sitting position of Indian cobblers when they work)[3] is an asana.Contents1 Etymology 2 Description 3 Benefits 4 Precautions 5 Variations 6 See also 7 References 8 Further reading 9 External linksEtymology[edit] The name comes from the Sanskrit words baddha (बद्ध, baddha) meaning "bound", kona (कोण, koṇa) meaning "angle" or "split",[4] and Asana
Asana
(आसन, Āsana) meaning "posture" or "seat".[5] Description[edit] From sitting position with both the legs outstretched forward, hands by the sides, palms resting on the ground, fingers together pointing forward, the legs are hinged at the knees so the soles of the feet meet. The legs are grasped at the ankles and folded more until the heels reach the perineum
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Bakāsana
Bakāsana (Sanskrit: बकासन, Crane Pose), often used interchangeably with Kakasana (Sanskrit: काकासन, Crow Pose) is an asana.[1] In all variations, Crane/Crow is an arm balancing asana in which hands are planted on the floor, shins rest upon upper arms, and feet lift up.[2]Contents1 Etymology 2 Description 3 Benefits 4 Variations 5 Follow-up asanas 6 Gallery 7 See also 8 References 9 Further reading 10 External linksEtymology[edit] The two names for the asana come from the Sanskrit
Sanskrit
words baka ("crane") or kak ("crow"), and asana (आसन) meaning "posture" or "seat".[3][4]
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Bālāsana
Bālāsana
Bālāsana
(Sanskrit: बालासन), Child's Pose,[1] or Child's Resting Pose is an asana. Balasana is a counter asana for various asanas and is usually practiced before and after Sirsasana.[2]Contents1 Etymology 2 Description 3 See also 4 References 5 Further reading 6 External linksEtymology[edit] The name comes from the Sanskrit words bala meaning "child" and asana (आसन) meaning "posture" or "seat".[3] Description[edit] In this asana, the body faces the floor in a fetal position. The knees and hips are bent with the shins on the floor. The chest can rest either on the knees or the knees can be spread to about the width of a yoga mat, allowing the chest to go between the knees. The head is stretched forward towards the ground - the forehead may touch the ground
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Ardha Matsyendrāsana
Ardha Matsyendrasana (Sanskrit: अर्धमत्स्येन्द्रासन; IAST: Ardha Matsyendrāsana), Half Lord of the Fishes Pose,[1] Half Spinal Twist Pose[2] or Vakrasana[3] is an asana. The asana usually appears as a seated spinal twist with many variations, and is one of the twelve basic asanas in many systems of Hatha Yoga.[4]Contents1 Etymology 2 Description 3 Variations3.1 Ardha Matsyendrasana I 3.2 Ardha Matsyendrasana III4 Benefits 5 See also 6 References 7 Further reading 8 External linksEtymology[edit] The asana is named after the great yogi Matsyendranath.[5] The name comes from the Sanskrit words ardha meaning "half", matsya meaning "fish", eendra meaning "king", and asana (आसन ) meaning "posture" or "seat".[6] The name Vakrasana comes from the Sanskrit word→ "Vakra" ('twisted').[3] Description[edit] One foot is placed flat on the floor outside the opposite leg and torso twists toward the top leg
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Bhujaṅgāsana
Bhujangasana
Bhujangasana
(Sanskrit pronunciation: [bʱʊ.ɟ͡ʝəŋ.gɑːsə.nə];[1] Sanskrit: भुजङ्गासन; IAST: Bhujaṅgāsana) or Cobra Pose[2] is a back-bending yoga asana[3].Contents1 Etymology 2 Benefits 3 Cautions 4 Follow-up asanas 5 See also 6 References 7 Further reading 8 External linksEtymology[edit] The name comes from the Sanskrit words bhujanga meaning "snake" or "serpent" and asana (आसन) meaning "posture" or "seat".From a prone position with palms and legs on the floor, the chest is lifted. This asana resembles a serpent with its hood raised. Cobra Pose or Bhujangasana
Bhujangasana
is part of the sequence of yoga postures in Padma Sadhana and Surya Namaskar
Surya Namaskar
or Sun Salutation. Bhujangasana
Bhujangasana
is pronounced as BHU-jung-AAHS-uh-nuh
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Bhujapīḍāsana
Bhujapidasana
Bhujapidasana
(Sanskrit: भुजपीडासन; IAST: Bhujapīḍāsana) or Shoulder pressing posture[1] is a Yoga
Yoga
asana.[2]Contents1 Etymology 2 Description 3 See also 4 References 5 SourcesEtymology[edit] The name of this asana comes from Bhuja (Sanskrit: भुज) meaning "arm" or "shoulder", Pīḍa (Sanskrit: पीडा) meaning "pressure" [2] and Asana
Asana
(Sanskrit: आसन) meaning "posture".[3] Description[edit] Bhujapidasana
Bhujapidasana
is an arm supported asana in which the base of support are the palms of the hands. It requires both balance and strength to maintain. See also[edit] Yoga
Yoga
portalMālāsanaReferences[edit]^ " Yoga
Yoga
Journal - Shoulder-pressing posture". Retrieved 2012-12-07.  ^ a b Iyengar, B.K.S (1979). Light on Yoga. New York: Schocken. pp. 280–2
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Caturaṅga Daṇḍāsana
Chaturanga Dandasana
Dandasana
(Sanskrit: चतुरङ्ग दण्डासन; Sanskrit pronunciation: [cɐt̪urɐŋgɐ d̪ɐɳɖɑːsɐn̪ɐ]; IAST: Caturaṅga Daṇḍāsana) or Four-Limbed Staff Pose,[1] also known as Low Plank, is a Yoga
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Chakrāsana
Chakrasana
Chakrasana
(Sanskrit: चक्रासन IAST: Chakrāsana, Wheel Pose) or Urdva Dhanurasana (Sanskrit: ऊर्ध्वधनुरासन; IAST: Ūrdhvadhanurāsana, Upward-Facing Bow Pose) is an asana. It is a backbend and part of the finishing sequence in the Primary Series of Ashtanga. It gives great flexibility to the spine. In acrobatics and gymnastics this body position is commonly called a back bridge.Contents1 Etymology 2 Description 3 Benefits 4 Variations 5 Gallery 6 See also 7 References 8 Further reading 9 External linksEtymology[edit] The name comes from the Sanskrit words Chakra
Chakra
(चक्र, Chakra) meaning "wheel",[1] and Asana
Asana
(आसन, Āsana) meaning "posture" or "seat".[2][3] Description[edit] In the general form of the asana, the practitioner has hands and feet on the floor, and the abdomen arches up toward the sky
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Daṇḍāsana
Dandasana
Dandasana
(IPA: [dəɳɖɑːsənə] /dɑːnˈdɑːsɑːnɑː/ dahn-DAH-sah-nah;[1] Sanskrit: दण्डासन; IAST: Daṇḍāsana) or Staff Pose[2] is an asana.Contents1 Etymology 2 Description 3 Benefits 4 See also 5 References 6 Further reading 7 External linksEtymology[edit] The name comes from the Sanskrit words Danda (दन्द, Danda) meaning "stick",[3] and Asana
Asana
(आसन, Āsana) meaning "posture".[4] Description[edit] It was founded by Sajag. To achieve this asana, begin in a seated position with the legs extended forward. The palms or the fingertips (if the palms don't reach) should be rested on either side of the body. The upper-body should be extending upward through the crown of the head, and the back should be completely perpendicular to the ground (as though sitting against a wall)
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