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Hilderic
Hilderic
Hilderic
(460s – 533) was the penultimate king of the Vandals
Vandals
and Alans
Alans
in North Africa in Late Antiquity (523–530). Although dead by the time the Vandal
Vandal
kingdom was overthrown in 534, he nevertheless played a key role in that event. Hilderic
Hilderic
was the grandson of king Genseric, founder of the Vandal kingdom in Africa
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Carthage
Carthage
Carthage
(/ˈkɑːrθɪdʒ/, from Latin: Carthago; Phoenician: Qart-ḥadašt ("New city")) was the center or capital city of the ancient Carthaginian civilization, on the eastern side of the Lake of Tunis
Tunis
in what is now the Tunis Governorate
Tunis Governorate
in Tunisia. The city developed from a Phoenician colony into the capital of an empire dominating the Mediterranean during the first millennium BC.[1] The legendary Queen Dido
Dido
is regarded as the founder of the city, though her historicity has been questioned. According to accounts by Timaeus of Tauromenium, she purchased from a local tribe the amount of land that could be covered by an oxhide
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Catholicity
Catholicity
Catholicity
(from Greek καθολικότητα της εκκλησίας, "catholicity of the church"),[1] or catholicism (from Greek καθολικισμός, "universal doctrine") is a concept that encompasses the beliefs and practices of numerous Christian denominations, most notably those that describe themselves as Catholic in accordance with the Four Marks of the Church, as expressed in the Nicene <
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Sassanian Empire
Temporarily controlled during the Byzantine– Sasanian
Sasanian
War of 602–628:  Abkhazia[12]  Russia (  Dagestan
Dagestan
and  Chechnya)  Turkey  Lebanon  Israel   Palestinian National Authority
Palestinian National Authority
( West Bank
West Bank
and Gaza strip)[13]  Jordan  EgyptPart of a series on theHistory of IranMythological historyPishdadian dynasty Kayanian dynastyAncient periodBCPrehistory of Iran Ancient Times–4000Kura–Araxes culture 3400–2000Proto-Elamite 3200–2700Jiroft culture c. 3100 – c. 2200Elam 2700–539 Akkadian
Akkadian
Empire 2400–2150Kassites c. 1500 – c
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Theodosius I
Theodosius I
Theodosius I
(Latin: Flavius Theodosius Augustus;[1] Greek: Θεοδόσιος Αʹ; 11 January 347 – 17 January 395), also known as Theodosius the Great, was Roman Emperor
Roman Emperor
from AD 379 to AD 395, as the last emperor to rule over both the eastern and the western halves of the Roman Empire. On accepting his elevation, he campaigned against Goths
Goths
and other barbarians who had invaded the empire. He failed to kill, expel, or entirely subjugate them, and after the Gothic War, they established a homeland south of the Danube, in Illyricum, within the empire's borders
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Galla Placidia
Aelia Galla Placidia
Galla Placidia
(388 – 27 November 450), daughter of the Roman emperor Theodosius I, was regent to Valentinian III
Valentinian III
from 423 until his majority in 437, and a major force in Roman politics for most of her life
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Special
Special
Special
or specials may refer to:Contents1 Music 2 Film and television 3 Other uses 4 See alsoMusic[edit] Special
Special
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Procopius
Procopius
Procopius
of Caesarea
Caesarea
(Greek: Προκόπιος ὁ Καισαρεύς Prokopios ho Kaisareus, Latin: Procopius Caesariensis; c. 500 – c. 554 AD) was a prominent late antique Greek scholar from Palaestina Prima.[1] Accompanying the Byzantine chief-general Belisarius
Belisarius
in the wars of the Emperor Justinian, he became the principal Greek-Byzantine historian of the 6th century, writing the Wars (or Histories), the Buildings of Justinian and the now-celebrated (and infamous) Secret History
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Byzantine Empire
The Byzantine
Byzantine
Empire, also referred to as the Eastern Roman Empire, was the continuation of the Roman Empire
Roman Empire
in the East during Late Antiquity and the Middle Ages, when its capital city was Constantinople
Constantinople
(modern-day Istanbul, which had been founded as Byzantium). It survived the fragmentation and fall of the Western Roman Empire
Roman Empire
in the 5th century AD and continued to exist for an additional thousand years until it fell to the Ottoman Turks in 1453.[2] During most of its existence, the empire was the most powerful economic, cultural, and military force in Europe
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Galla (wife Of Theodosius I)
Flavia Galla (died 394 CE) was an empress of the Roman Empire
Roman Empire
and a princess of the Western Roman Empire. She was the second empress consort of Theodosius I. She was the daughter of Valentinian I
Valentinian I
and his second wife Justina.Contents1 Family 2 Marriage to Theodosius 3 Empress 4 Children 5 References 6 SourcesFamily[edit] Little is known of Galla, including her full name. Galla is the female cognomen for Gallus and, in Latin, gallus could mean both an inhabitant of Gaul
Gaul
and a rooster. Galla is listed as one of four children of the marriage by Jordanes. Her paternal uncle Valens
Valens
was Emperor of the Eastern Roman Byzantine Empire from 364 to his death in the Battle of Adrianople
Battle of Adrianople
(9 August 378)
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Arcadius
Arcadius
Arcadius
(Latin: Flavius Arcadius
Arcadius
Augustus; Greek: Ἀρκάδιος; 1 January 377 – 1 May 408) was Eastern Roman Emperor
Roman Emperor
from 395 to 408. He was the eldest son of Theodosius I
Theodosius I
and his first wife Aelia Flaccilla, and brother of the Western Emperor Honorius. A weak ruler, his reign was dominated by a series of powerful ministers and by his wife, Aelia Eudoxia.[citation needed]Contents1 History 2 Character and works 3 See also 4 Notes 5 References 6 External linksHistory[edit] Arcadius
Arcadius
was born in Hispania, the elder son of Theodosius I
Theodosius I
and Aelia Flaccilla, and brother of Honorius, who would become a Western Roman Emperor. His father declared him an Augustus
Augustus
and co-ruler for the Eastern half of the Empire in January 383
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Arianism
In Christianity, Arianism
Arianism
is a Christological[1] concept which asserts the belief that Jesus
Jesus
Christ is the Son of God
Son of God
who was begotten by God the Father
Father
at a point in time, is distinct from the Father
Father
and is therefore subordinate to the Father.[2] Arian teachings were first attributed to Arius
Arius
(c. AD 256–336), a Christian presbyter in Alexandria, Egypt. The teachings of Arius
Arius
and his supporters were opposed to the theological views held by Homoousian Christians, regarding the nature of the Trinity
Trinity
and the nature of Christ
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Constantius III
Constantius III
Constantius III
(Latin: Flavius Constantius Augustus), was Western Roman Emperor
Roman Emperor
in 421, from 8 February 421 to 2 September 421. He served as a general under Honorius, achieving the rank of Magister militum by 411. Also in 411, he was sent to suppress the revolt of Constantine III. Constantius led his army to Arles, and defeated Gerontius, a general rebelling against Constantine, before himself besieging Arles. After defeating a relief force led by Edobichus, Constantius convinced Constantine to surrender, offering a safe retirement to a monastery. However, once Constantine had surrendered Constantius had him imprisoned and then beheaded. Constantius then went on to lead campaigns against various barbarian groups in Hispania and Gaul, recovering much of both for the Western Roman Empire. Constantius was proclaimed Western Roman Emperor
Roman Emperor
by Honorius on 8 February 421
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Theodosius II
Theodosius II
Theodosius II
(Latin: Flavius Theodosius Junior Augustus;[1] Greek: Θεοδόσιος Βʹ; 10 April 401 – 28 July 450),[2] commonly surnamed Theodosius the Younger,[3] or Theodosius the Calligrapher, was the Eastern Roman Emperor
Roman Emperor
for most of his life, taking the throne as an infant in 402 and ruling as the Eastern Empire’s sole emperor after the death of his father Arcadius
Arcadius
in 408, until 450. He is mostly known for promulgating the Theodosian law code, and for the construction of the Theodosian Walls of Constantinople
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Valentinian III
Valentinian III
Valentinian III
(Latin: Flavius Placidius Valentinianus Augustus;[1] 2 July 419 – 16 March 455) was Western Roman Emperor
Roman Emperor
from 425 to 455. His reig
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Roman Emperors
The Roman Emperors were rulers of the Roman Empire, wielding power over its citizens and military. The empire was developed as the Roman Republic invaded and occupied most of Europe and portions of northern Africa and western Asia. Under the republic, regions of the empire were ruled by provincial governors answerable to and authorised by the "Senate and People of Rome". Rome
Rome
and its senate were ruled by a variety of magistrates – of whom the consuls were the most powerful. The republic ended, and the emperors were created, when these magistrates became legally and practically subservient to one citizen with power over all other magistrates. Augustus, the first emperor, was careful to maintain the façade of republican rule, taking no specific title for his position[1] and calling the concentration of magisterial power princeps senatus (the first man of the senate).[1] This style of government lasted for 300 years, and is thus called the Principate
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