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Highcolor
High color
High color
graphics (variously spelled Highcolor, Hicolor, Hi-color, Hicolour, and Highcolour, and known as Thousands of colors on a Macintosh) is a method of storing image information in a computer's memory such that each pixel is represented by two bytes
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Color Depth
Color
Color
depth or colour depth (see spelling differences), also known as bit depth, is either the number of bits used to indicate the color of a single pixel, in a bitmapped image or video frame buffer, or the number of bits used for each color component of a single pixel.[1][2][3][4] For consumer video standards, such as High Efficiency Video Coding (H.265), the bit depth specifies the number of bits used for each color component.[1][2][3][4] When referring to a pixel, the concept can be defined as bits per pixel (bpp), which specifies the number of bits used. When referring to a color component, the concept can be defined as bits per component, bits per channel, bits per color (all three abbreviated bpc), and also bits per pixel component, bits per color channel or bits per sample (bps).[1][2][5] Color
Color
depth is only one aspect of color representation, expressing how finely levels of color can be expressed (a.k.a
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Red
Red
Red
is the color at the end of the visible spectrum of light, next to orange and opposite violet. It has a dominant wavelength of approximately 625–740 nanometres.[1] It is a primary color in the RGB color model
RGB color model
and the CMYK color model, and is the complementary color of cyan. Reds range from the brilliant yellow-tinged scarlet and vermillion to bluish-red crimson, and vary in shade from the pale red pink to the dark red burgundy.[2] The red sky at sunset results from Rayleigh scattering, while the red color of the Grand Canyon
Grand Canyon
and other geological features is caused by hematite or red ochre, both forms of iron oxide
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Special
Special
Special
or specials may refer to:Contents1 Music 2 Film and television 3 Other uses 4 See alsoMusic[edit] Special
Special
(album), a 1992
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International Standard Book Number
"ISBN" redirects here. For other uses, see ISBN (other).International Standard Book
Book
NumberA 13-digit ISBN, 978-3-16-148410-0, as represented by an EAN-13 bar codeAcronym ISBNIntroduced 1970; 48 years ago (1970)Managing organisation International ISBN AgencyNo. of digits 13 (formerly 10)Check digit Weighted sumExample 978-3-16-148410-0Website www.isbn-international.orgThe International Standard Book
Book
Number (ISBN) is a unique[a][b] numeric commercial book identifier. Publishers purchase ISBNs from an affiliate of the International ISBN Agency.[1] An ISBN is assigned to each edition and variation (except reprintings) of a book. For example, an e-book, a paperback and a hardcover edition of the same book would each have a different ISBN. The ISBN is 13 digits long if assigned on or after 1 January 2007, and 10 digits long if assigned before 2007
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Planar (computer Graphics)
In computer graphics, planar is the method of representing pixel colors with several bitplanes of RAM. Each bit in a bitplane is related to one pixel on the screen. Unlike chunky, high color, or true color graphics, the whole dataset for an individual pixel isn't in one specific location in RAM, but spread across the bitplanes that make up the display. This scheme originated in the early days of computer graphics. The memory chips of this era can not supply data fast enough on their own to generate a picture on a TV screen or monitor from a large framebuffer.[1] By splitting the data up into multiple planes, each plane can be stored on a separate memory chip. These chips can then be read in parallel at a slower rate, allowing graphical display on modest hardware. The EGA video adapter on early IBM PC
IBM PC
computers uses planar arrangement in color graphical modes for this reason
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TIFF
Tagged Image File Format, abbreviated TIFF or TIF, is a computer file format for storing raster graphics images, popular among graphic artists, the publishing industry,[1] and photographers. TIFF is widely supported by scanning, faxing, word processing, optical character recognition, image manipulation, desktop publishing, and page-layout applications.[2] The format was created by Aldus
Aldus
Corporation for use in desktop publishing. It published the latest version 6.0 in 1992, subsequently updated with an Adobe Systems
Adobe Systems
copyright after the latter acquired Aldus
Aldus
in 1994
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Binary Numeral System
In mathematics and digital electronics, a binary number is a number expressed in the base-2 numeral system or binary numeral system, which uses only two symbols: typically 0 (zero) and 1 (one). The base-2 numeral system is a positional notation with a radix of 2. Each digit is referred to as a bit
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Chroma Subsampling
Chroma subsampling
Chroma subsampling
is the practice of encoding images by implementing less resolution for chroma information than for luma information, taking advantage of the human visual system's lower acuity for color differences than for luminance.[1] It is used in many video encoding schemes – both analog and digital – and also in JPEG
JPEG
encoding.Contents1 Rationale 2 How subsampling works 3 Sampling systems and ratios 4 Types of sampling and subsampling4.1 4:4:4 4.2 4:2:2 4.3 4:2:1 4.4 4:1:1 4.5 4:2:0 4.6 4:1:0 4.7 3:1:15 Out-of-gamut colors 6 Terminology 7 History 8 See also 9 ReferencesRationale[edit]In full size, this image shows the difference between four subsampling schemes. Note how similar the color images appear. The lower row shows the resolution of the color information.Digital signals are often compressed to reduce file size and save transmission time
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RGB
The RGB color model
RGB color model
is an additive color model in which red, green and blue light are added together in various ways to reproduce a broad array of colors. The name of the model comes from the initials of the three additive primary colors, red, green, and blue. The main purpose of the RGB color model
RGB color model
is for the sensing, representation and display of images in electronic systems, such as televisions and computers, though it has also been used in conventional photography. Before the electronic age, the RGB color model already had a solid theory behind it, based in human perception of colors. RGB is a device-dependent color model: different devices detect or reproduce a given RGB value differently, since the color elements (such as phosphors or dyes) and their response to the individual R, G, and B levels vary from manufacturer to manufacturer, or even in the same device over time
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Palette-shifting
Color cycling, also known as palette shifting, is a technique used in computer graphics in which colors are changed in order to give the impression of animation. This technique was mainly used in early computer games, as storing one image and changing its palette required less memory and processor power than storing the animation as several frames. Examples of use[edit]Animated color cycling feature as in FractIntThe Windows 9x
Windows 9x
boot screen used color cycling to provide animation. The 3D maze screensaver included with earlier versions of Windows used color cycling to animate the four fractal textures available. The Amiga
Amiga
Boing Ball cycled the ball's checkerboard pattern between red and white to create the illusion of the ball rotating. SimCity 2000
SimCity 2000
made extensive use of this technique: every building with animation had its animation provided by color cycling
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Cirrus Logic
Cirrus Logic
Cirrus Logic
Inc. is a fabless semiconductor supplier that specializes in analog, mixed-signal, and audio DSP integrated circuits (ICs).[2] Since 1998, the company's headquarters have been in Austin, Texas.[2][3] The company's audio processors and audio converters feature in many professional audio and consumer entertainment products, including smartphones, tablets, digital headsets, automotive entertainment systems, home-theater receivers, and smart home applications, such as smart speakers. Dr
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Blue
Blue
Blue
is one of the three primary colours of pigments in painting and traditional colour theory, as well as in the RGB colour model. It lies between violet and green on the spectrum of visible light. The eye perceives blue when observing light with a dominant wavelength between approximately 450 and 495 nanometres. Most blues contain a slight mixture of other colors; azure contains some green, while ultramarine contains some violet. The clear daytime sky and the deep sea appear blue because of an optical effect known as Rayleigh scattering. An optical effect called Tyndall scattering
Tyndall scattering
explains blue eyes. Distant objects appear more blue because of another optical effect called atmospheric perspective. Blue
Blue
has been an important colour in art and decoration since ancient times
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Binary Image
A binary image is a digital image that has only two possible values for each pixel. Typically, the two colors used for a binary image are black and white. The color used for the object(s) in the image is the foreground color while the rest of the image is the background color.[1] In the document-scanning industry, this is often referred to as "bi-tonal". Binary images are also called bi-level or two-level. This means that each pixel is stored as a single bit—i.e., a 0 or 1. The names black-and-white, B&W, monochrome or monochromatic are often used for this concept, but may also designate any images that have only one sample per pixel, such as grayscale images. In Photoshop parlance, a binary image is the same as an image in "Bitmap" mode.[2][3] Binary images often arise in digital image processing as masks or as the result of certain operations such as segmentation, thresholding, and dithering
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Green
Green
Green
is the color between blue and yellow on the visible spectrum. It is evoked by light which has a dominant wavelength of roughly 495–570 nm. In subtractive color systems, used in painting and color printing, it is created by a combination of yellow and blue, or yellow and cyan; in the RGB color model, used on television and computer screens, it is one of the additive primary colors, along with red and blue, which are mixed in different combinations to create all other colors. By far the largest contributor to green in nature is chlorophyll, the chemical by which plants photosynthesize and convert sunlight into chemical energy
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Bit
The bit (a portmanteau of binary digit)[1] is a basic unit of information used in computing and digital communications. A binary digit can have only one of two values, and may be physically represented with a two-state device. These state values are most commonly represented as either a 0or1. The two values of a binary digit can also be interpreted as logical values (true/false, yes/no), algebraic signs (+/−), activation states (on/off), or any other two-valued attribute. The correspondence between these values and the physical states of the underlying storage or device is a matter of convention, and different assignments may be used even within the same device or program
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