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High Noon
High Noon
High Noon
is a 1952 American Western film produced by Stanley Kramer from a screenplay by Carl Foreman, directed by Fred Zinnemann, and starring Gary Cooper
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Paul Dubov
Paul Dubov (October 10, 1918 – September 20, 1979) was an American film actor and screenwriter.[1] He frequently appeared in the work of Sam Fuller.[2] He later became a screenwriter, and often worked with his wife, Gwen Bagni (1913–2001), whom he married in 1963.[3] The couple co-developed the 1965–66 ABC-TV series, Honey West for television (starring Anne Francis) and wrote scripts for the series from which it was a spin off, Burke's Law starring Gene Barry
Gene Barry
on the same network. Both series were produced by Four Star Television. Among his many television roles as an actor included that of Federal Agent and wiretap specialist Jack Rossman in the original pilot episode of another ABC series, The Untouchables, starring Robert Stack, which was later released into theatres as The Scarface Mob. His role was taken over for the actual series by Steve London
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Marshal
Marshal
Marshal
is a term used in several official titles in various branches of society. As marshals became trusted members of the courts of Medieval Europe, the title grew in reputation. During the last few centuries, it has been used for elevated offices, such as in military rank and civilian law enforcement.Contents1 Etymology 2 Military2.1 Marshal
Marshal
ranks by country 2.2 Marshal
Marshal
equivalents 2.3 Military police3 Ceremonial and protocol 4 Civilian 5 Political5.1 Dignitaries of Poland 5.2 Demonstration marshal6 Sports6.1 Racing and other competitions7 Games 8 Law enforcement 9 United States9.1 Federal marshals 9.2 State and local marshals10 United Kingdom10.1 England 10.2 Scotland11 France 12 Netherlands 13 See also 14 ReferencesEtymology[edit] "Marshal" is an ancient loanword from Old (Norman) French (cf
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Dick Elliott
Richard "Dick" Elliott (April 30, 1886 – December 22, 1961) was an American character actor who played in over 240 films from the 1930s until the time of his death.Contents1 Early years 2 Career 3 Death 4 Partial filmography 5 References 6 External linksEarly years[edit] He was born Richard Damon Elliott in Boston, Massachusetts.[1] Career[edit] Elliott played many different roles, typically as a somewhat blustery sort, such as a politician. A short, fat man, Elliott played Santa Claus on the Jimmy Durante, Red Skelton, and Jack Benny
Jack Benny
programs. Elliott had a couple of memorable lines in It's a Wonderful Life (1946), in which he scolded James Stewart, who was trying to say goodnight to Donna Reed, advising him to stop hemming and hawing and "just go ahead and kiss her". He also had a few memorable appearances in episodes of the Adventures of Superman television series
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Quid Pro Quo
Quid pro quo ("something for something" in Latin)[1] is a phrase used in English to mean an exchange of goods or services, in which one transfer is contingent upon the other; "a favour for a favour". Phrases with similar meanings include: "give and take", "tit for tat", and "you scratch my back, and I'll scratch yours".Contents1 In common law1.1 United Kingdom2 Origins 3 In literature 4 Other meanings 5 See also 6 NotesIn common law[edit] In common law, quid pro quo indicates that an item or a service has been traded in return for something of value, usually when the propriety or equity of the transaction is in question. A contract must involve consideration: that is, the exchange of something of value for something else of value
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Pacifism
Pacifism
Pacifism
is opposition to war, militarism, or violence. The word pacifism was coined by the French peace campaigner Émile Arnaud (1864–1921) and adopted by other peace activists at the tenth Universal Peace Congress
Universal Peace Congress
in Glasgow
Glasgow
in 1901.[1] A related term is ahimsa (to do no harm), which is a core philosophy in Buddhism
Buddhism
and Jainism. While modern connotations are recent, having been explicated since the 19th century, ancient references abound. In modern times, interest was revived by Leo Tolstoy
Leo Tolstoy
in his late works, particularly in The Kingdom of God Is Within You. Mohandas Gandhi (1869–1948) propounded the practice of steadfast nonviolent opposition which he called "satyagraha", instrumental in its role in the Indian Independence Movement
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Quaker
Quakers
Quakers
(or Friends) are members of a historically Christian group of religious movements formally known as the Religious Society of Friends or Friends Church.[2] Members of the various Quaker movements are all generally united in a belief in the ability of each human being to experientially access "the light within", or "that of God
God
in every person". Some may profess the priesthood of all believers, a doctrine derived from the First Epistle of Peter.[3][4][5][6] They include those with evangelical, holiness, liberal, and traditional Quaker understandings of Christianity. There are also Nontheist Quakers whose spiritual practice is not reliant on the existence of a Christian God
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New Mexico Territory
The Territory of New Mexico
New Mexico
was an organized incorporated territory of the United States
United States
that existed (with varying boundaries) from September 9, 1850, until January 6, 1912, when the remaining extent of the territory was admitted to the Union as the State of New Mexico, making it the longest-lived organized incorporated territory of the United States, lasting approximately 62 years.Contents1 Before the Territory was organized 2 Compromise of 1850
Compromise of 1850
and disputes over slavery 3 Territorial evolution 4 American Civil War 5 See also 6 Footnotes 7 Further readingBefore the Territory was organized[edit] Main article: U.S. provisional government of New MexicoProposed boundaries for the earlier federal State of New Mexico, 1850In 1846, during the Mexican-American War, the U.S. provisional government of New Mexico
New Mexico
was established
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Golden Globe Award
Golden Globe Awards are accolades bestowed by the 93 members of the Hollywood Foreign Press Association
Hollywood Foreign Press Association
beginning in January 1944, recognizing excellence in film and television, both domestic and foreign. The annual ceremony at which the awards are presented is a major part of the film industry's awards season, which culminates each year in the Academy Awards.[1] The eligibility period for the Golden Globes corresponds to the calendar year (i.e. January 1 through December 31). The most recent ceremony, the 75th Golden Globe Awards, honoring the best in film and television in 2017, was held on January 7, 2018
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Academy Awards
MoonlightBest Picture The Shape of WaterThe Academy Awards, also known as the Oscars,[1] are a set of 24 awards for artistic and technical merit in the American film industry, given annually by the Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences (AMPAS), to recognize excellence in cinematic achievements as assessed by the Academy's voting membership. The various category winners are awarded a copy of a golden statuette, officially called the "Academy Award of Merit", which has become commonly known by its nickname "Oscar". The sculpture was created by George Stanley.[2] The awards, first presented in 1929 at the Hollywood Roosevelt Hotel, are overseen by AMPAS.[3][4] The awards ceremony was first broadcast on radio in 1930 and televised for the first time in 1953. It is now seen live in more than 200 countries and can be streamed live online.[5] The Academy Awards ceremony is the oldest worldwide entertainment awards ceremony
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Library Of Congress
The Library of Congress
Library of Congress
(LOC) is the research library that officially serves the United States
United States
Congress and is the de facto national library of the United States. It is the oldest federal cultural institution in the United States. The Library is housed in three buildings on Capitol Hill in Washington, D.C.; it also maintains the Packard Campus in Culpeper, Virginia, which houses the National Audio-Visual Conservation Center.[3] The Library of Congress
Library of Congress
claims to be the largest library in the world.[4][5] Its "collections are universal, not limited by subject, format, or national boundary, and include research materials from all parts of the world and in more than 450 languages
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Lucien Prival
Lucien Prival (July 14, 1901 – June 3, 1994) was an American film actor.[1] He appeared in more than 70 films between 1926 and 1953. Partial filmography[edit] The Great Deception
The Great Deception
(1926)
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Harry Shannon (actor)
Harry Shannon (June 13, 1890 – July 27, 1964) was an American character actor. He often appeared in Western films.Contents1 Biography 2 Selected filmography 3 References 4 External linksBiography[edit] Harry Shannon was born on a farm in Saginaw, Michigan. He began his career in live theatre and vaudeville, and switched to the film industry in the 1930s. Although he played most frequently in Westerns, his best-known film role was perhaps as Charles Foster Kane's rough father in Citizen Kane
Citizen Kane
(1941). Among his other films were Someone to Remember (1943), Alaska Highway (1943), San Quentin (1946), and Witness to Murder (1954).[1] In 1960, he was cast as the outlaw Clay Hooper in the episode "Showdown at Goldtown" of the ABC/ Warner Brothers
Warner Brothers
western television series, Colt .45
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Harry Harvey (actor)
Harry William Harvey Sr. (January 10, 1901 – November 27, 1985) was an American actor of theatre, film, and television. He was the father of actor, script supervisor, and director Harry William Harvey Jr..Contents1 Career 2 Filmography 3 References 4 Sources 5 External linksCareer[edit] Born in Indian Territory, now Oklahoma,[1] Harvey appeared in minstrel shows, in vaudeville,[2] and on the Broadway stage but is best remembered as a character actor who appeared in more than three hundred films and episodes of television series
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William Newell (actor)
William M. Newell (January 6, 1894 – February 21, 1967)[1] was an American film actor.Contents1 Biography 2 Partial filmography 3 References 4 External linksBiography[edit] Newell was most active in the 1930s, familiar to fans of the Our Gang short subjects in his recurring role as Alfalfa's father, and as Dr. Henley on Our Miss Brooks
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Merrill McCormick
Merrill McCormick (February 5, 1892 – August 19, 1953) was an American film actor
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