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High-speed Rail
High-speed rail
High-speed rail
is a type of rail transport that operates significantly faster than traditional rail traffic, using an integrated system of specialized rolling stock and dedicated tracks. While there is no single standard that applies worldwide, new lines in excess of 250 kilometres per hour (160 miles per hour) and existing lines in excess of 200 kilometres per hour (120 miles per hour) are widely considered to be high-speed, with some extending the definition to include lower speeds in areas for which these speeds still represent significant improvements.[1] The first such system began
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Glossary Of Australian Railway Terms
Australians
Australians
(/əˈstreɪliən/), colloquially known as Aussies (/ˈɒzi/), are people associated with Australia, sharing a common history, culture, and language (Australian English). Present-day Australians
Australians
are citizens of the Commonwealth of Australia, governed by its nationality law. The majority of Australians
Australians
descend from the peoples of the British Isles. The Colony of New South Wales
Colony of New South Wales
was established by the Kingdom of Great Britain in 1788, with the arrival of the First Fleet, and five other colonies were established in the early 19th century, now forming the six present-day Australian states
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Mount Fuji
Mount Fuji
Mount Fuji
(富士山, Fujisan, IPA: [ɸɯꜜdʑisaɴ] ( listen)), located on Honshu Island, is the highest mountain in Japan
Japan
at 3,776.24 m (12,389 ft) and 7th-highest mountain on an island.[1] It is an active stratovolcano that last erupted in 1707–1708.[4][5] Mount Fuji lies about 100 kilometres (60 mi) south-west of Tokyo, and can be seen from there on a clear day. Mount Fuji's exceptionally symmetrical cone, which is snow-capped for about 5 months a year, is a well-known symbol of Japan
Japan
and it is frequently depicted in art and photographs, as well as visited by sightseers and climbers.[6] Mount Fuji
Mount Fuji
is one of Japan's "Three Holy Mountains" (三霊山, Sanreizan) along with Mount Tate
Mount Tate
and Mount Haku
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Rolling Stock
The term rolling stock in rail transport industry originally referred to any vehicles that move on a railway. It has since expanded to include the wheeled vehicles used by businesses on roadways.[1][2][3] It usually includes both powered and unpowered vehicles, for example locomotives, railroad cars, coaches, and wagons.[4][5][6][7]Contents1 Overview 2 Code names 3 See also 4 References 5 External linksOverview[edit] Note that stock in the term is business related and used in a sense of inventory
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Freight
In economics, cargo or freight are goods or produce being conveyed – generally for commercial gain – by water, air or land. Cargo
Cargo
was originally a shipload. Cargo
Cargo
now covers all types of freight, including that carried by train, van, truck, or intermodal container.[1] The term cargo is also used in case of goods in the cold-chain, because the perishable inventory is always in transit towards a final end-use, even when it is held in cold storage or other similar climate-controlled facility. Multi-modal container units, designed as reusable carriers to facilitate unit load handling of the goods contained, are also referred to as cargo, specially by shipping lines and logistics operators. Similarly, aircraft ULD boxes are also documented as cargo, with associated packing list of the items contained within
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Grade Separation
Grade separation
Grade separation
is the name given to a method of aligning a junction of two or more surface transport axes at different heights (grades) so that they will not disrupt the traffic flow on other transit routes when they cross each other. The composition of such transport axes does not have to be uniform; it can consist of a mixture of roads, footpaths, railways, canals, or airport runways
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Right-of-way (transportation)
A right-of-way (ROW) is a right to make a way over a piece of land, usually to and from another piece of land. A right of way is a type of easement granted or reserved over the land for transportation purposes, this can be for a highway, public footpath, rail transport, canal, as well as electrical transmission lines, oil and gas pipelines.[1] A right-of-way can be used to build a bike trail. A right-of-way is reserved for the purposes of maintenance or expansion of existing services with the right-of-way. In the case of an easement, it may revert to its original owners if the facility is abandoned.Contents1 Rail right-of-way1.1 Rail rights-of-way uses other than rail transport2 See also 3 ReferencesRail right-of-way[edit] In the United States, railroad rights-of-way (ROW or R/O/W) are generally considered private property by the respective railroad owners and by applicable state laws. Most U.S
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Minimum Railway Curve Radius
The minimum railway curve radius is the shortest allowable design radius for the centre line of railway tracks under a particular set of conditions. It has an important bearing on constructions costs and operating costs and, in combination with superelevation (difference in elevation of the two rails) in the case of train tracks, determines the maximum safe speed of a curve. Minimum radius of curve is one parameter in the design of railway vehicles[1] as well as trams.[2] Monorails and guideways are also subject to minimum radii.Contents1 History 2 Factors affecting the minimum curve radius2.1 Steam locomotives 2.2 Couplings 2.3 Train lengths 2.4 Speed and cant3 Transition curves 4 Vertical curves 5 Problem curves 6 List of selected minimum curve radii 7 See also 8 References 9 External linksHistory[edit] The first proper railway was the Liverpool and Manchester Railway which opened in 1830
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Glossary Of United Kingdom Railway Terms
A glossary, also known as a vocabulary or clavis, is an alphabetical list of terms in a particular domain of knowledge with the definitions for those terms. Traditionally, a glossary appears at the end of a book and includes terms within that book that are either newly introduced, uncommon, or specialized. While glossaries are most commonly associated with non-fiction books, in some cases, fiction novels may come with a glossary for unfamiliar terms. A bilingual glossary is a list of terms in one language defined in a second language or glossed by synonyms (or at least near-synonyms) in another language. In a general sense, a glossary contains explanations of concepts relevant to a certain field of study or action. In this sense, the term is related to the notion of ontology
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Glossary Of New Zealand Railway Terms
This is a list of jargon commonly used by railfans and railway employees in New Zealand.Contents: B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P R S TB[edit]Blue Rattlers ADK class on the Auckland
Auckland
suburban network Blue Streaks Three NZR RM class
NZR RM class
88 seater railcars renovated for a fast service between Hamilton and Auckland[1][2] Tranz Rail
Tranz Rail
Bumble-Bee liveryBumble-Bee Yellow and black Tranz Rail
Tranz Rail
livery. Introduced on DC 4323 in 2001 after the Makihi collision, and officially named 'Hi-Viz'. Originally all locos were to have the Tranz Rail
Tranz Rail
winged logo, but most carried 'TR' block letters on the long hood and several locos did not carry any branding (No Name).C[edit]Carvan Passenger carriage with a guard's compartment at one end, classes AF (wooden body) and AL (steel body)
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Lists Of Rail Accidents
This is the list of rail accident lists. Lists[edit]ChronologicalBefore 1880 1880–1889 1890–1899 1900–29 1930–49 1950–59 1960–69 1970–79 1980–89 1990–99 2000–09 2010–presentOtherBy country By death toll Terrorist incidentsSee also[edit]Disasters portal Trains portal Trams portalClassification of railway accidents Derailment Train
Train
wreck Tram accident Train-pedestrian fatalitiesv t eRail accidentsMain topicsClassification Boiler explosion Derailment Head-on collision Rear-end collision Runaway Signal passed at danger Stop and examine Telescoping
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Glossary Of North American Railway Terms
This page contains a list of terms, jargon, and slang used to varying degrees by railfans and railroad employees in the United States
United States
and Canada
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Railroad Car
A railroad car or railcar (American and Canadian English),[a] railway wagon or railway carriage ( British English
British English
and UIC), also called a train car or train wagon, is a vehicle used for the carrying of cargo or passengers on a rail transport system (a railroad/railway). Such cars, when coupled together and hauled by one or more locomotives, form a train. Alternatively, some passenger cars are self-propelled in which case they may be either single railcars or make up multiple units. The term "car" is commonly used by itself in American English
American English
when a rail context is implicit. Indian English
Indian English
sometimes uses "bogie" in the same manner,[1] though the term has other meanings in other variants of English
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Rail Transport By Country
This page provides an index of articles on rail transport by country. Other indexes available include: List of railway companies
List of railway companies
by country List of countries by rail transport network size Rail usage statistics by country List of locomotive builders by country List of Railway couplings by country Rail subsidies
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Locomotive
A locomotive or engine is a rail transport vehicle that provides the motive power for a train. If a locomotive is capable of carrying a payload, it is usually rather referred to as multiple units, motor coaches, railcars or power cars; the use of these self-propelled vehicles is increasingly common for passenger trains, but rare for freight (see CargoSprinter). Traditionally, locomotives pulled trains from the front
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