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Hideyoshi
Toyotomi Hideyoshi
Toyotomi Hideyoshi
(豊臣 秀吉, March 17, 1537 – September 18, 1598) was a preeminent daimyō, warrior, general, samurai, and politician of the Sengoku period[1] who is regarded as Japan's second "great unifier".[2] He succeeded his former liege lord, Oda Nobunaga, and brought an end to the Warring Lords period. The period of his rule is often called the Momoyama period, named after Hideyoshi's castle. After his death, his young son Hideyori was displaced by Tokugawa Ieyasu. Hideyoshi is noted for a number of cultural legacies, including the restriction that only members of the samurai class could bear arms. He financed the construction, restoration and rebuilding of many temples standing today in Kyoto. Outside of Japan, he is best known for ordering the Japanese invasions of Korea (1592–98)
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Aichi Prefecture
Aichi Prefecture
Aichi Prefecture
(愛知県, Aichi-ken) is a prefecture of Japan located in the Chūbu region.[1] The region of Aichi is also known as the Tōkai region. The capital is Nagoya
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Second World War
Allied victoryCollapse of Nazi Germany Fall of Japanese and Italian Empires Dissolution of the League of Nations Creation of the United Nations Emergence of the United States
United States
and the Soviet Union
Soviet Union
as superpowers Beginning of the Cold War
Cold War
(more...)ParticipantsAllied Powers Axis PowersCommanders and leadersMain Allied leaders Joseph Stalin Franklin D
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Right To Keep And Bear Arms
The right to keep and bear arms (often referred to as the right to bear arms) is the people's right to possess weapons (arms) for their own defense, as described in the philosophical and political writings of Aristotle, Cicero, John Locke, Machiavelli, the English Whigs and others.[1] Inclusion of this right in a written constitution is uncommon. In 1875, 17 percent of constitutions included a right to bear arms, yet, since the early twentieth century, "the proportion has been less than 9 percent and falling".[2] In their historical survey and comparative analysis of constitutions dating back to 1789,[2] Tom Ginsburg
Tom Ginsburg
and colleagues "identified only 15 constitutions (in nine countries) that had ever included an explicit right to bear arms
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Daijō Daijin
The Daijō-daijin
Daijō-daijin
or Dajō-daijin[1] (太政大臣, Chancellor of the Realm) was the head of the Daijō-kan
Daijō-kan
(Department of State) in Heian Japan
Japan
and briefly under the Meiji Constitution. Equivalent to the Chinese Taishi (太師) (Grand Preceptor).Contents1 History 2 Functions 3 List of the Chancellors of the Realm 4 See also 5 Notes 6 ReferencesHistory[edit] Emperor Tenji's favorite son, Prince Ōtomo, was the first to have been accorded the title of Daijō-daijin
Daijō-daijin
during the reign of his father.[2] The Asuka Kiyomihara Code of 689 marks the initial appearance of the Daijō Daijin in the context of a central administrative body composed of the three ministers: the Daijō Daijin (Chancellor), the Sadaijin
Sadaijin
(Minister of the Left), and the Udaijin (Minister of the Right)
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Saitō Clan
The Saitō clan (斎藤氏, Saitō-shi) was a Japanese samurai kin group from Echizen Province.[1] History[edit] The clan claimed descent from Fujiwara Toshihito.[1] Saitō Dōsan
Saitō Dōsan
(1494–1556) was the father-in-law of Oda Nobunaga. Dōsan was attacked by his own son, Saitō Yoshitatsu; and he died in battle.[2] Saitō Tatsuoki
Saitō Tatsuoki
was the son of Yoshitatsu. Tatsuoki was defeated by Oda Nobunaga
Oda Nobunaga
in 1564; and the clan disappeared.[1] References[edit]^ a b c Papinot, Jacques Edmond Joseph. (1906). Dictionnaire d’histoire et de géographie du Japon; Papinot, (2003). ("Baba"?) Nobiliare du Japon, p. 50 [PDF 54 of 80]; retrieved 2013-4-30. ^ Nussbaum, Louis-Frédéric. (2005). "Saitō Dōsan" in Japan Encyclopedia, p
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Mount Kinka (Gifu)
Mt. Kinka (金華山, Kinka-zan), also known as Kinkazan, is located in the heart of the city of Gifu, Gifu
Gifu, Gifu
Prefecture, Japan, and rises to a height of 329 m (1,079 ft). Previously called Mt. Inaba (稲葉山 Inaba-yama), it has long served as the representative symbol of Gifu. It stands along the Nagara River, creating bountiful nature within the city. Though it is the most famous mountain in the city, Mount Dodo, to the north, is the tallest.Contents1 History 2 Reaching the summit 3 Summit
Summit
attractions 4 Area attractions 5 ReferencesHistory[edit] First built by the Nikaidō family during the Kamakura period, Gifu Castle atop Mt. Kinka has gone through many forms, with the current building being constructed in 1956.[1] One of its first major residents was Saitō Dōsan, who lived in the castle when it was still being called Inabayama Castle and the mountain was still called Mt. Inaba
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Japanese Name
Japanese names (日本人の氏名, Nihonjin no Shimei) in modern times usually consist of a family name (surname), followed by a given name. More than one given name is not generally used. Japanese names are usually written in kanji, which are characters usually Chinese in origin but Japanese in pronunciation
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Daimyō
The daimyō (大名, IPA: [daimʲoː] ( listen)) were powerful Japanese feudal lords[1] who, until their decline in the early Meiji period, ruled most of Japan from their vast, hereditary land holdings. In the term, dai (大) means "large", and myō stands for myōden (名田), meaning private land.[2] Subordinate only to the shōgun, daimyōs were the most powerful feudal rulers from the 10th century to the middle 19th century in Japan. From the Shugo of the Muromachi period
Muromachi period
through the Sengoku to the daimyōs of the Edo
Edo
period, the rank had a long and varied history
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Battle Of Okehazama
The Battle of Okehazama
Battle of Okehazama
(桶狭間の戦い, Okehazama-no-tatakai) took place in June 1560. In this battle, Oda Nobunaga
Oda Nobunaga
defeated Imagawa Yoshimoto and established himself as one of the front-running warlords in the Sengoku period.[2]Contents1 Background 2 Battle 3 Aftermath 4 Legacy 5 References 6 External linksBackground[edit] In June 1560, Imagawa Yoshimoto, with an army of about 25,000 men, set forth on a march to Kyoto. Entering the Oda territories in Owari Province, he first took the border fortresses of Washizu and Marune before setting up camp in a wooded gorge known as Dengaku-hazama
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Ashigaru
Ashigaru
Ashigaru
(足軽, "light [of] foot") were foot-soldiers employed by the samurai class of feudal Japan. The first known reference to ashigaru was in the 14th century,[1] but it was during the Ashikaga shogunate– Muromachi period
Muromachi period
that the use of ashigaru became prevalent by various warring factions.[2]Contents1 Origins 2 Weapons and armour 3 Service in war 4 New weapons and new tactics 5 Discontinuation of conscription 6 Gallery 7 References 8 External linksOrigins[edit] Attempts were made in Japan by Emperor Tenmu
Emperor Tenmu
(673–686) to have a conscripted national army, but this did not come about, and by the 10th century Japan instead relied on individual landowners to provide men for conflicts and wars
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Imagawa Yoshimoto
Imagawa Yoshimoto
Imagawa Yoshimoto
(今川 義元, 1519 – June 12, 1560) was a pre-eminent daimyō (feudal lord) in the Sengoku period
Sengoku period
Japan. Based in Suruga Province,[1] he was one of the three daimyōs that dominated the Tōkaidō region. Battling against the Takeda, and Hojo clans made Yoshimoto and his soldiers experienced. Imagawa was an amazing diplomat, eventually securing key alliances with them, and after vassalizing the Matsudaira clan of the famed Tokugawa Ieyasu; Imagawa Yoshimoto was considered the strongest Daimyo in the Tokaido. Imagawa Yoshimoto enjoyed a strong position, and wanted to be Shogun, he was said to even have an obsession with dressing like one. He was one of the dominant daimyōs in Japan
Japan
until his death in 1560 after trying to march on the capital to become Shogun
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Owari Province
Owari Province
Owari Province
(尾張国, Owari no Kuni) was a province of Japan in the area that today forms the western half of Aichi Prefecture, including the modern city of Nagoya.[1] The province was created in 646. Owari bordered on Mikawa, Mino, and Ise Provinces. Owari and Mino provinces were separated by the Sakai River, which means "border river." The province's abbreviated name was Bishū (尾州). Ukiyo-e
Ukiyo-e
print by Hiroshige, Owari, from The Famous Scenes of the Sixty States (六十余州名所図会), depicting a festival at Tsushima ShrineOwari is classified as one of the provinces of the Tōkaidō
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Suruga Province
Suruga Province
Suruga Province
(駿河国, Suruga no kuni) was an old province in the area that is today the central part of Shizuoka Prefecture.[1] Suruga bordered on Izu, Kai, Sagami, Shinano, and Tōtōmi provinces; and was bordered by the Pacific Ocean
Pacific Ocean
through Suruga Bay
Suruga Bay
to the south
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Tsukioka Yoshitoshi
Tsukioka Yoshitoshi
Yoshitoshi
(Japanese: 月岡 芳年; also named Taiso Yoshitoshi
Yoshitoshi
大蘇 芳年; 30 April 1839 – 9 June 1892) was a Japanese artist.[1] He is widely recognized as the last great master of the ukiyo-e genre of woodblock printing and painting. He is also regarded as one of the form's greatest innovators. His career spanned two eras – the last years of Edo
Edo
period Japan, and the first years of modern Japan following the Meiji Restoration. Like many Japanese, Yoshitoshi
Yoshitoshi
was interested in new things from the rest of the world, but over time he became increasingly concerned with the loss of many aspects of traditional Japanese culture, among them traditional woodblock printing. By the end of his career, Yoshitoshi
Yoshitoshi
was in an almost single-handed struggle against time and technology
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Imagawa Clan
Imagawa clan
Imagawa clan
(今川氏, Imagawa-uji) was a Japanese noble military clan that claimed descent from the Seiwa Genji
Seiwa Genji
by way of the Kawachi Genji
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