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Hewlett Packard
Coordinates: 37°24′49″N 122°08′42″W / 37.413579°N 122.14508°W / 37.413579; -122.14508 Hewlett-Packard
Hewlett-Packard
CompanyLast logo of Hewlett-Packard
Hewlett-Packard
used from 2010 to 2015; now used by HP Inc.HP headquarters in Palo Alto, California, U.S.Former typePublicTraded as NYSE: HPQIndustry Computer hardware Computer software IT services IT consultingFate Renamed as HP Inc.Successor HP Inc. Hewlett Packard EnterpriseFounded January 1, 1939; 79 years ago (1939-01-01)Founders William Redington Hewlett
William Redington Hewlett
and David PackardDefunct November 1, 2015 (2015-11-01) (main company) (For Hewlett Packard Enterprise)
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Surround Sound
Surround sound
Surround sound
is a technique for enriching the sound reproduction quality of an audio source with additional audio channels from speakers that surround the listener (surround channels). Its first application was in movie theaters. Prior to surround sound, standard theater sound systems had three "screen channels" of sound, emitted by loudspeakers located only in front of the audience: at the left, center, and right. Surround sound
Surround sound
adds one or more channels from loudspeakers behind the listener, thus is able to create the sensation of sound coming from any horizontal direction 360° about the listener. There are various surround sound–based formats and techniques, varying in reproduction and recording methods along with the number and positioning of additional channels
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Subsidiary
A subsidiary, subsidiary company or daughter company[1][2][3] is a company that is owned or controlled by another company, which is called the parent company, parent, or holding company.[4][5] The subsidiary can be a company, corporation, or limited liability company. In some cases it is a government or state-owned enterprise. In some cases, particularly in the music and book publishing industries, subsidiaries are referred to as imprints. In the United States railroad industry, an operating subsidiary is a company that is a subsidiary but operates with its own identity, locomotives and rolling stock
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Fortune 500
The Fortune 500
Fortune 500
is an annual list compiled and published by Fortune magazine that ranks 500 of the largest United States
United States
corporations by total revenue for their respective fiscal years.[2] The list includes publicly held companies, along with privately held companies for which revenues are publicly available. The concept of the Fortune 500
Fortune 500
was created by Edgar P. Smith, a Fortune editor, and the first list was published in 1955.[3][4] The Fortune 500
Fortune 500
is more commonly used than its subset Fortune 100 or wider list Fortune 1000.[5]Contents1 Methodology 2 History 3 Fortune 500
Fortune 500
lists 4 See also 5 References 6 External linksMethodology[edit] The original Fortune 500
Fortune 500
was limited to companies whose revenues were derived from manufacturing, mining, and energy exploration
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Stanford University
Stanford University
University
(officially Leland Stanford
Leland Stanford
Junior University,[11] colloquially the Farm) is a private research university in Stanford, California. Because of its academic strength, wealth, and proximity to Silicon Valley, Stanford is often cited as one of the world's most prestigious universities.[12][13][14][15][16][17][18][19] The university was founded in 1885 by Leland and Jane Stanford
Jane Stanford
in memory of their only child, Leland Stanford
Leland Stanford
Jr., who had died of typhoid fever at age 15 the previous year. Stanford was a former Governor of California
California
and U.S. Senator; he made his fortune as a railroad tycoon
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Merger
Mergers and acquisitions
Mergers and acquisitions
(M&A) are transactions in which the ownership of companies, other business organizations or their operating units are transferred or combined. As an aspect of strategic management, M&A can allow enterprises to grow, shrink, and change the nature of their business or competitive position. From a legal point of view, a merger is a legal consolidation of two entities into one entity, whereas an acquisition occurs when one entity takes ownership of another entity's stock, equity interests or assets. From a commercial and economic point of view, both types of transactions generally result in the consolidation of assets and liabilities under one entity, and the distinction between a "merger" and an "acquisition" is less clear
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Frederick Terman
Frederick Emmons Terman (/ˈtɜːrmən/; June 7, 1900 – December 19, 1982) was an American professor and academic administrator. He is widely credited (together with William Shockley) as being the father of Silicon Valley.[1]Contents1 Education 2 Academic career2.1 War years 2.2 Stanford Research Park
Stanford Research Park
and Silicon Valley3 Recognition 4 References 5 Sources 6 External linksEducation[edit] Terman completed his undergraduate degree in chemistry and his master's degree in electrical engineering at Stanford University.[2] His father, Lewis Terman, a psychologist who studied gifted children and popularized the IQ test
IQ test
in America, was a professor at Stanford. His mother, Anna Belle Minton Terman, attended Central Normal College, Danville, Indiana, and taught English at a school nearby. In 1895 she met Lewis M
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Corporate Spin-off
A corporate spin-off, also known as a spin-out,[1] or starburst, is a type of corporate action where a company "splits off" a section as a separate business.[2]Contents1 Characteristics1.1 U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission 1.2 Other definitions2 Reasons for spin-offs2.1 Conglomerate discount3 Examples3.1 Academia 3.2 Mirror companies4 See also 5 References 6 Further readingCharacteristics[edit] Spin-offs are divisions of companies or organizations that then become independent businesses with assets, employees, intellectual property, technology, or existing products that are taken from the parent company. Shareholders of the parent company receive equivalent shares in the new company in order to compensate for the loss of equity in the original stocks
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Great Depression
The Great Depression
Great Depression
was a severe worldwide economic depression that took place mostly during the 1930s, beginning in the United States. The timing of the Great Depression
Great Depression
varied across nations; in most countries it started in 1929 and lasted until the late-1930s.[1] It was the longest, deepest, and most widespread depression of the 20th century.[2] In the 21st century, the Great Depression
Great Depression
is commonly used as an example of how far the world's economy can decline.[3] The Great Depression
Great Depression
started in the United States
United States
after a major fall in stock prices that began around September 4, 1929, and became worldwide news with the stock market crash of October 29, 1929 (known as Black Tuesday). Between 1929 and 1932, worldwide gross domestic product (GDP) fell by an estimated 15%
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Market Share Of Personal Computer Vendors
The annual worldwide market share of personal computer vendors includes desktop computers, laptop computers and netbooks, but excludes mobile devices, such as tablet computers that do not fall under the category of 2-in-1 PCs.Contents1 Top vendors market share (2017) 2 Historical vendors market share2.1 2011–2016 2.2 2006–2010 2.3 2001–2005 2.4 1996–20003 Unit sales3.1 1996–20164 See also 5 ReferencesTop vendors market share (2017)[edit]Top 6 vendors by number of units shipped, 2017Rank Manufacturer Market share[1]1 HP 21.0%2 Lenovo 20.8%3 Dell 15.2%4 Apple 7.4%5 Asus 6.8%6 Acer 6.5%Historical vendors market share[edit] 2011–2016[edit]Global PC market share by units, percent (2011–2016)Rank 2011 [2] 2012 [3] 2013 [4] 2014 [5] 2015 [6] 2016 [7]1 HP 16.6 HP 16.1 Lenovo 16.9 Lenovo 18.8 Lenovo 19.8 Lenovo 20.72 Lenovo 12.5 Lenovo 14.9 HP
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Electronic Oscillator
An electronic oscillator is an electronic circuit that produces a periodic, oscillating electronic signal, often a sine wave or a square wave.[1][2] Oscillators convert direct current (DC) from a power supply to an alternating current (AC) signal. They are widely used in many electronic devices. Common examples of signals generated by oscillators include signals broadcast by radio and television transmitters, clock signals that regulate computers and quartz clocks, and the sounds produced by electronic beepers and video games.[1] Oscillators are often characterized by the frequency of their output signal:A low-frequency oscillator (LFO) is an electronic oscillator that generates a frequency below approximately 20 Hz
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Small And Medium-sized Enterprises
Small and medium-sized enterprises (SMEs, also small and medium enterprises) or small and medium-sized businesses (SMBs) are businesses whose personnel numbers fall below certain limits. The abbreviation "SME" is used in the European Union
European Union
and by international organizations such as the World Bank, the United Nations and the World Trade Organization
World Trade Organization
(WTO). Small enterprises outnumber large companies by a wide margin and also employ many more people
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Technology Company
A technology company (often tech company) is a type of business entity that focuses primarily on the development and manufacturing of technology. Apple, Google, IBM, Lenovo, Huawei, Microsoft, and Oracle, among others, are considered prototypical technology companies.[1] Information technology
Information technology
(IT) companies and high tech companies are subsets of technology companies. See also[edit]List of the largest information technology companies Dot-com company Disney litigation Outline of technologyReferences[edit]Wikimedia Commons has media related to Technology
Technology
companies.^ What All the Recent Tech Company Splits Say about the Future of Cloud ComputingThis business-related article is a stub
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Information Technology
Information
Information
technology (IT) is the use of computers to store, retrieve, transmit and manipulate data,[1] or information, often in the context of a business or other enterprise.[2] IT is considered to be a subset of information and communications technology (ICT). Humans have been storing, retrieving, manipulating, and communicating information since the Sumerians in Mesopotamia
Mesopotamia
developed writing in about 3000 BC,[3] but the term information technology in its modern sense first appeared in a 1958 article published in the Harvard Business Review; authors Harold J. Leavitt and Thomas L. Whisler commented that "the new technology does not yet have a single established name
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Multinational Corporation
A multinational corporation (MNC) or worldwide enterprise[5] is a corporate organization that owns or controls production of goods or services in at least one country other than its home country.[6] A multinational corporation can also be referred to as a multinational enterprise (MNE), a transnational enterprise (TNE), a transnational corporation (TNC), an international corporation, or a stateless corporation.[7] There are subtle but real differences between these three labels, as well as multinational corporation and worldwide enterprise. Multinational corporations are subject to criticisms for lacking ethical standards, and that this shows up in how they evade ethical laws and leverage their own business agenda with capital, and even the military backing of their own wealthy host nation-states.Contents1 Overview 2 Theoretical background 3 Transnational corporations 4 Multinational enterprise 5
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HP200A
The HP200A was the first product made by Hewlett-Packard and was manufactured in David Packard's garage in Palo Alto, California. It was a low-distortion audio oscillator used for testing sound equipment. It used the Wien bridge oscillator circuit, that had been the subject of Bill Hewlett's Masters thesis. It was also the first such commercial oscillator to use a simple light bulb as the temperature-dependent resistor in its feedback network.[1] The light bulb was an inexpensive and effective automatic gain control that not only kept the oscillator output amplitude constant, but it also kept the oscillator's loop gain near unity. The latter is a key technique for achieving a low distortion oscillator
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