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Heshang Gong
Heshang Gong (also Ho-Shang Kung ) was a reclusive hermit from the 1st century CE who wrote a commentary on Laozi’s Dao De Jing. Little is known about the life of Heshang Gong; however the impact of his writing is extensive in regards to the understanding and translation of the Dao De Jing, and is considered one of the earliest proponents of Daoist meditative practices which cultivate the “three treasures” of vitality, energy, and spirit, and the "dual cultivation" of spiritual nature (xing) and life-and-destiny (ming). Heshang Gong's name is only known as the epithet Riverside Elder (河上公[1]; Wade-Giles romanization: Ho Shang Kung; pinyin romanization: Heshang Gong). Of this commentary, Dan G. Reid (2015: ii) says "Heshang Gong’s insights into Daoist wisdom, history, cosmogony, and meditative practices, have been an essential aid to understanding the meaning, applicability, and cultural context of the Dao De Jing throughout Chinese history
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Laozi
Laozi
Laozi
(UK: /ˈlaʊˈzɪər/;[1] also Lao-Tzu /ˈlaʊˈtsuː/,[1] /ˈlaʊˈdzʌ/[2][3] or Lao-Tze /ˈlaʊˈdzeɪ/;[4] Chinese: 老子; pinyin: Lǎozǐ, literally "Old Master") was an ancient Chinese philosopher and writer. He is the reputed author of the Tao
Tao
Te Ching,[5] the founder of philosophical Taoism, and a deity in religious Taoism
Taoism
and traditional Chinese religions. A semi-legendary figure, Laozi
Laozi
was usually portrayed as a 6th-century BC contemporary of Confucius, but most modern historians consider him to have lived during the Warring States period of the 5th or 4th century BC.[6] A central figure in Chinese culture, Laozi
Laozi
is claimed by both the emperors of the Tang dynasty
Tang dynasty
and modern people of the Li surname as a founder of their lineage
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Tao
Tao
Tao
(/taʊ/) or Dao (/daʊ/ DOW; from Chinese: 道; pinyin: Dào [tâu] ( listen)) is a Chinese word signifying 'way', 'path', 'route', 'road', 'choose', 'key' or sometimes more loosely 'doctrine', 'principle' or 'holistic science' [1]
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Special
Special
Special
or specials may refer to:Contents1 Music 2 Film and television 3 Other uses 4 See alsoMusic[edit] Special
Special
(album), a 1992 album by Vesta Williams "Special" (Garbage song), 1998 "Special
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Tao Te Ching
The Tao
Tao
Te Ching (/ˈdaʊ dɛˈdʒɪŋ/ DOW deh-JING),[1] also known by its pinyin romanizations Daodejing and Dao De Jing, is a Chinese classic text traditionally credited to the 6th-century BC sage Laozi. The text's authorship, date of composition and date of compilation are debated.[2] The oldest excavated portion dates back to the late 4th century BC,[3] but modern scholarship dates other parts of the text as having been written—or at least compiled—later than the earliest portions of the Zhuangzi.[4] The Tao
Tao
Te Ching, along with the Zhuangzi, is a fundamental text for both philosophical and religious Taoism. It also strongly influenced other schools of Chinese philosophy
Chinese philosophy
and religion, including Legalism, Confucianism, and Buddhism, which was largely interpreted through the use of Taoist words and concepts when it was originally introduced to China
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Daoist Meditation
Daoist meditation
Daoist meditation
refers to the traditional meditative practices associated with the Chinese philosophy and religion of Daoism, including concentration, mindfulness, contemplation, and visualization. Techniques of Daoist meditation
Daoist meditation
are historically interrelated with Buddhist meditation, for instance, 6th-century Daoists developed guan 觀 "observation" insight meditation from Tiantai
Tiantai
Buddhist anapanasati "mindfulness of breath" practices. Traditional Chinese medicine
Traditional Chinese medicine
and Chinese martial arts
Chinese martial arts
have adapted certain Daoist meditative techniques
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Heshang Gong
Heshang Gong (also Ho-Shang Kung ) was a reclusive hermit from the 1st century CE who wrote a commentary on Laozi’s Dao De Jing. Little is known about the life of Heshang Gong; however the impact of his writing is extensive in regards to the understanding and translation of the Dao De Jing, and is considered one of the earliest proponents of Daoist meditative practices which cultivate the “three treasures” of vitality, energy, and spirit, and the "dual cultivation" of spiritual nature (xing) and life-and-destiny (ming). Heshang Gong's name is only known as the epithet Riverside Elder (河上公[1]; Wade-Giles romanization: Ho Shang Kung; pinyin romanization: Heshang Gong). Of this commentary, Dan G. Reid (2015: ii) says "Heshang Gong’s insights into Daoist wisdom, history, cosmogony, and meditative practices, have been an essential aid to understanding the meaning, applicability, and cultural context of the Dao De Jing throughout Chinese history
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