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Herefordshire (UK Parliament Constituency)
The county constituency of Herefordshire, in the West Midlands of England bordering on Wales, was abolished when the county was divided for parliamentary purposes in 1885. It was a constituency of the House of Commons of the Parliament of England, then of the Parliament of Great Britain from 1707 to 1800 and of the Parliament of the United Kingdom from 1801 to 1885. The undivided county was represented from 1290 by two Knights of the Shire until 1832 and three thereafter
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County Constituency
In the United Kingdom
United Kingdom
(UK), each of the electoral areas or divisions called constituencies elect one member to a parliament or assembly, with the exception of European Parliament
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Historic Counties Of England
The historic counties of England
England
are areas that were established for administration by the Normans, in most cases based on earlier kingdoms and shires established by the Anglo-Saxons
Anglo-Saxons
and others
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Cavalier
The term Cavalier
Cavalier
(/ˌkævəˈlɪər/) was first used by Roundheads as a term of abuse for the wealthier Royalist supporters of King Charles I and his son Charles II of England
Charles II of England
during the English Civil War, the Interregnum, and the Restoration (1642 – c. 1679). It was later adopted by the Royalists themselves. Although it referred originally to political and social attitudes and behaviour, of which clothing was a very small part, it has subsequently become strongly identified with the fashionable clothing of the court at the time
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Roundhead
Roundheads were supporters of the Parliament of England
Parliament of England
during the English Civil War. Also known as Parliamentarians, they fought against Charles I of England
Charles I of England
and his supporters, the Cavaliers or Royalists, who claimed rule by absolute monarchy and the divine right of kings.[1] The goal of the Roundhead
Roundhead
party was to give the Parliament supreme control over executive administration.[2]Contents1 Beliefs 2 Origins and background 3 Notes 4 ReferencesBeliefs[edit] Most Roundheads sought constitutional monarchy in place of the absolutist monarchy sought by Charles I
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Long Parliament
The Long Parliament
Long Parliament
was an English Parliament which lasted from 1640 until 1660. It followed the fiasco of the Short Parliament
Short Parliament
which had convened for only three weeks during the spring of 1640, and which in turn had followed an 11-year parliamentary absence. In September 1640[1] King Charles I issued writs summoning a parliament to convene on 3 November 1640[a] He intended it would pass financial bills, a step made necessary by the costs of the Bishops' Wars
Bishops' Wars
in Scotland
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Short Parliament
The Short Parliament
Short Parliament
was a Parliament of England
Parliament of England
that was summoned by King Charles I of England
Charles I of England
on 20 February 1640 and sat from 13 April to 5 May 1640
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Thomas Brugge, 5th Baron Chandos
Thomas Brugge, de jure 5th Baron Chandos (1427 – 30 January 1493), was an English peer.Contents1 Origins 2 Career 3 Marriages and family 4 ReferencesOrigins[edit] Thomas Brugge was born in Coberley, Gloucestershire, England[1] son of Giles Brugge, 4th Baron Chandos and Catherine Clifford, daughter of James Clifford of Frampton-on-Severn, Gloucestershire
Gloucestershire
and widow of Anselm Guise.[2] Career[edit] Brugge was Knight of the Shire (MP) for Gloucestershire
Gloucestershire
in 1460 and for Herefordshire
Herefordshire
in 1472.[3] He succeeded to the title of 5th Lord Chandos on 13 April 1467, de jure, on the death of his father.[4] Marriages and family[edit] Brugge's first marriage was to Margaret Banaster, from which there was no issue
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House Of Commons Of The United Kingdom
The House of Commons
House of Commons
is the lower house of the Parliament of the United Kingdom. Like the upper house, the House of Lords, it meets in the Palace of Westminster. Officially, the full name of the house is the Honourable the Commons of the United Kingdom
United Kingdom
of Great Britain
Great Britain
and Northern Ireland
Northern Ireland
in Parliament assembled. Offices however extend to Portcullis House
Portcullis House
due to shortage of space. The Commons is an elected body consisting of 650 members known as Members of Parliament (MPs). Members are elected to represent constituencies by first-past-the-post and hold their seats until Parliament is dissolved. The House of Commons
House of Commons
of England
England
evolved in the 13th and 14th centuries
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Peter De La Mare
Peter
Peter
may refer to:Contents1 People 2 Culture 3 Other uses 4 See alsoPeople[edit]List of people named Peter, a list of people with the given name Peter
Peter
(given name)
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Roger Le Rous
Roger le Rouse was Archdeacon of Totnes
Archdeacon of Totnes
during 1297.[1] References[edit]^ ”Some account of the barony and town of Okehampton:Its antiquities and institutions” Bridges, W.B; Wright, W.H.K; Rattenbury, J; Shebbeare, R; Thomas, C; Fothergill, H.G Tiverton, W.Masland,1889v t eArchdeacons of TotnesHigh MedievalJohn de Bradelgehe Hugh de Avigo Ascelinus Baldwin of Forde Robert Bernard John Fitz-John Gilbert Basset Walter de Gray John de Bridport Thomas de Boues Richard Cowe Hugh Ysaac John de Kent Roger de Wynkleigh Thomas Pincerna John Geoffrey William de Pembroke Richard Blunt Thomas de Hertford Henry de Bolleghe Thomas de Bodham Roger le RousLate MedievalThomas de Charlton William de Puntyngdon Roger de Charlton John de Northwode v. John Piers Peter de Gildesburgh
Peter de Gildesburgh
v. Richard de Swinnerton William Steele v
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Forty Shilling Freeholders
Forty-shilling freeholders were a group of people who had the parliamentary franchise to vote by possessing freehold property, or lands held directly of the king, of an annual rent of at least forty shillings (i.e. £2 or 3 marks), clear of all charges.[1] The qualification to vote using the ownership and value of property, and the creation of a group of forty-shilling freeholders, was practiced in many jurisdictions such as England, Scotland, Ireland, the United States of America, Australia
Australia
and Canada.Contents1 History 2 England
England
and Wales 3 Ireland 4 See also 5 References 6 BibliographyHistory[edit] Main article: Montfort's Parliament The English parliament of 1265 was instigated by Simon de Montfort, 6th Earl of Leicester, without royal approval. Simon de Montfort's army had met and defeated the royal forces at the Battle of Lewes on May 14, 1264
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Parliamentary Borough
A borough is an administrative division in various English-speaking countries. In principle, the term borough designates a self-governing walled town, although in practice, official use of the term varies widely. History[edit] The word borough derives from common Proto-Germanic "*burgz", meaning "fort": compare with bury, burgh and brough (England), burgh (Scotland), Burg (Germany), borg (Scandinavia), burcht, burg (Dutch), boarch (West Frisian), and the Germanic borrowing present in neighbouring Indo-European languages
Indo-European languages
such as borgo (Italian), bourg (French), burgo (Spanish and Portuguese), burg (Romanian), purg (Kajkavian) and durg (दर्ग) (Hindi) and arg (ارگ) (Persian)
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Barebone's Parliament
Barebone's Parliament, also known as the Little Parliament, the Nominated Assembly and the Parliament of Saints, came into being on 4 July 1653, and was the last attempt of the English Commonwealth to find a stable political form before the installation of Oliver Cromwell as Lord Protector. It was an assembly entirely nominated by Oliver Cromwell
Oliver Cromwell
and the Army's Council of Officers. It acquired its name from the nominee for the City of London, Praise-God Barebone. The Speaker of the House was Francis Rous. The total number of nominees was 140, 129 from England, five from Scotland
Scotland
and six from Ireland (see the list of MPs).[1] The assembly was inspired by the Jewish Sanhedrin. After conflict and infighting, on 12 December 1653 the members of the assembly voted to dissolve it
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Knights Of The Shire
Knights of the shire (Latin: milites comitatus[1]) was the formal title for members of parliament (MPs) representing a county constituency in the British House of Commons, from its origins in the medieval Parliament of England
Parliament of England
until the Redistribution of Seats Act 1885 ended the practice of each county (or shire) forming a single constituency. The corresponding titles for other MPs were burgess in a borough constituency (or citizen if the borough had city status) and baron for a Cinque Ports constituency
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Parliament Of Great Britain
The Parliament of Great Britain
Great Britain
was formed in 1707 following the ratification of the Acts of Union by both the Parliament of England and the Parliament of Scotland. The Acts created a new unified Kingdom of Great Britain
Great Britain
and dissolved the separate English and Scottish parliaments in favour of a single parliament, located in the former home of the English parliament in the Palace of Westminster, near the City of London
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