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Hereditary Succession
An order of succession is the sequence of those entitled to hold a high office such as head of state or an honour such as a title of nobility in the order in which they stand in line to it when it becomes vacated. This sequence may be regulated through descent or by statute. Hereditary government form differs from elected government. An established order of succession is the normal way of passing on hereditary positions, and also provides immediate continuity after an unexpected vacancy in cases where office-holders are chosen by election: the office does not have to remain vacant until a successor is elected. In some cases the successor takes up the full role of the previous office-holder, as in the case of the presidency of many countries; in other non-hereditary cases there is not a full succession, but a caretaker chosen by succession criteria assumes some or all of the responsibilities, but not the formal office, of the position
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Head Of State
A head of state (or chief of state) is the public persona who officially embodies a state in its unity and legitimacy. Depending on the country's form of government and separation of powers, the head of state may be a ceremonial figurehead or concurrently the head of government and more. In a parliamentary system, such as India, the head of state usually has mostly ceremonial powers, with a separate head of government. However in some parliamentary systems, like South Africa, there is an executive president that is both head of state and head of government. Likewise, in some parliamentary systems the head of state is not the head of government, but still has significant powers, for example Morocco. In contrast, a semi-presidential system, such as France, has both heads of state and government as the de facto leaders of the nation (in practice they divide the leadership of the nation among themselves)
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Line Of Succession To The French Throne (Bonapartist)
The line of succession to the throne of the French Empire was vested in the descendants and relations of Napoleon Bonaparte until the abolition of the French Empire in 1870.

Line Of Succession To The Former Throne Of Baden
The monarchy in Baden came to an end in 1918 along with the rest of the monarchies that made up the German Empire
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Line Of Succession To The Former Bavarian Throne
The Kingdom of Bavaria was abolished in 1918. The current head of its formerly ruling House of Wittelsbach is Franz, Duke of Bavaria. The succession is determined by Article 2 of Title 2 of the 1818 Constitution of the Kingdom of Bavaria, which states "The crown is hereditary among the male descendants of the royal house according to the law of primogeniture and the agnatic lineal succession.". The succession is further clarified by Title 5 of the Bavarian Royal Family Statute of 1819. In 1948 and 1949 Crown Prince Rupprecht, with the agreement of the other members of the house, amended the house laws to allow the succession of the sons of princes who had married into comital houses. In 1999 Duke Franz, with the agreement of the other members of the house, amended the house laws further to allow the succession of the sons of any princes who married with the permission of the head of the house. Franz has never married
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Line Of Succession To The Former Throne Of Bhopal
The line of succession to the former throne of Bhopal, among the pre-eminent Indian principalities, was, uniquely amongst the Indian princely houses, by male-preference primogeniture in the direct family line. This principle of succession was formally established by the last Nawab of Bhopal, Hamidullah Khan, upon his confirmation as ruler of Bhopal in 1926. Since his death in 1960, the identity of the present rightful claimant to the former throne remains a matter of contention, though the claim of the descendants of his second daughter Sajida Sultan has been recognised by the Indian government and courts
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Line Of Succession To The Former Brazilian Throne
The Brazilian monarchy came to an end on November 15, 1889, following a military coup which overthrew Emperor Dom Pedro II and established a republic
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Head Of The House Of Aisin Gioro
The House of Aisin Gioro ruled China during the Qing dynasty (1644-1912). A Chinese emperor would pick one of his many sons, or another relative, to succeed him. Under the Qing, a succession edict was hidden in the palace and read upon the death of the emperor. After Puyi, China's last emperor, was ousted in 1912, the country was declared a republic. Puyi was emperor of Manchukuo, now northeastern China, in 1934–1945. He died without issue in 1967. His brother Prince Pujie was next in line under a 1937 succession law, the most recently published agreed upon succession rule. Stories published in the Chicago Times and The New York Times acknowledge Pujie as heir of Puyi. Pujie died in 1994. He is survived by a daughter, Princess Husheng, who was born in 1941
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Succession To The French Throne
This article covers the mechanism by which the French throne passed from the establishment of the Frankish Kingdom in 486 to the fall of the Second French Empire in 1870.

Line Of Succession To The French Throne (Legitimist)
The Capetian dynasty is the largest dynasty in Europe, with over 120 living male members descended in the legitimate agnatic line. Since the extinction of the House of Courtenay in 1733, the House of Bourbon is the only remaining branch of legitimate descent. Descendants in the male line of Louis XIV through his grandson Philip V of Spain are designated as House of Bourbon; descendants in the male line of Philip I, Duke of Orléans, are designated as House of Orleans
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Line Of Succession To The French Throne (Orléanist)
The Orléanist claimant to the throne of France is Prince Henri, Count of Paris, Duke of France. He is the uncontested heir to the Orléanist position of "King of the French" held by Louis-Philippe, and is also King Charles X's heir as "King of France" if the 1713 Treaty of Utrecht (by which Philip V of Spain renounced for himself and his agnatic descendants any claim to the French throne) was valid. According to the Family Compact of 1909, only the descendants of the current pretender's father are considered to be dynasts of the House of France
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