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Herbert Henry Dow
Herbert Henry Dow
Herbert Henry Dow
(February 26, 1866 – October 15, 1930) was a Canadian-born American chemical industrialist, best known as the founder of the American multinational conglomerate Dow Chemical. He was a graduate of Case School of Applied Science in Cleveland, Ohio. He was a prolific inventor of chemical processes, compounds, and products, and was a successful businessman.Contents1 Biography1.1 Early years 1.2 Business career1.2.1 Foundation of Dow Chemical 1.2.2 Breaking a monopoly 1.2.3 World War I 1.2.4 Auto industry1.3 Death2 Commemoration 3 See also 4 References 5 External linksBiography[edit] Early years[edit] Herbert Henry Dow
Herbert Henry Dow
was born in 1866 in Belleville, Ontario, the eldest child of Americans Joseph Henry Dow, an inventor and mechanical engineer, and his wife, Sarah Bunnell, who were from Derby, Connecticut
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Dumping (pricing Policy)
Dumping, in economics, is a kind of predatory pricing, especially in the context of international trade
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Digital Object Identifier
In computing, a Digital Object Identifier or DOI is a persistent identifier or handle used to uniquely identify objects, standardized by the International Organization for Standardization
International Organization for Standardization
(ISO).[1] An implementation of the Handle System,[2][3] DOIs are in wide use mainly to identify academic, professional, and government information, such as journal articles, research reports and data sets, and official publications though they also have been used to identify other types of information resources, such as commercial videos. A DOI aims to be "resolvable", usually to some form of access to the information object to which the DOI refers. This is achieved by binding the DOI to metadata about the object, such as a URL, indicating where the object can be found. Thus, by being actionable and interoperable, a DOI differs from identifiers such as ISBNs and ISRCs which aim only to uniquely identify their referents
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Special
Special
Special
or specials may refer to:Contents1 Music 2 Film and television 3 Other uses 4 See alsoMusic[edit] Special
Special
(album), a 1992
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International Standard Book Number
"ISBN" redirects here. For other uses, see ISBN (other).International Standard Book
Book
NumberA 13-digit ISBN, 978-3-16-148410-0, as represented by an EAN-13 bar codeAcronym ISBNIntroduced 1970; 48 years ago (1970)Managing organisation International ISBN AgencyNo. of digits 13 (formerly 10)Check digit Weighted sumExample 978-3-16-148410-0Website www.isbn-international.orgThe International Standard Book
Book
Number (ISBN) is a unique[a][b] numeric commercial book identifier. Publishers purchase ISBNs from an affiliate of the International ISBN Agency.[1] An ISBN is assigned to each edition and variation (except reprintings) of a book. For example, an e-book, a paperback and a hardcover edition of the same book would each have a different ISBN. The ISBN is 13 digits long if assigned on or after 1 January 2007, and 10 digits long if assigned before 2007
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National Historic Landmark
A National Historic Landmark
National Historic Landmark
(NHL) is a building, district, object, site, or structure that is officially recognized by the United States government for its outstanding historical significance. Of over 90,000 places listed on the country's National Register of Historic Places, only some 2,500 are recognized as National Historic Landmarks. A National Historic Landmark
National Historic Landmark
District may include contributing properties that are buildings, structures, sites or objects, and it may include non-contributing properties
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Herbert H. Dow House
The Herbert H. Dow House is a historic house located in the Dow Gardens of Midland, Michigan. Built in 1899, it was the home of Herbert H. Dow (b. 1866), founder of Dow Chemical Company, from then until his death in 1930. It was declared a National Historic Landmark in 1976.[2][3] The house is open for guided tours; admission is charged.Contents1 Description and history 2 See also 3 References 4 External linksDescription and history[edit] The Herbert H. Dow House stands within Dow Gardens, now a public park. It is an architecturally vernacular 2-1/2 story wood frame structure, with a diversity of projections, roof styles, and window sizes and shapes. It is not considered to be architecturally significant. The house was built in 1899 for Herbert H. Dow,[3] and is now owned by the Herbert and Grace Dow Foundation. Herbert Dow, born in Canada and raised in Connecticut, received a Bachelor of Science degree in 1888, focused on chemistry, from the Case School of Applied Science
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International Standard Name Identifier
The International Standard Name Identifier (ISNI) is an identifier for uniquely identifying the public identities of contributors to media content such as books, television programmes, and newspaper articles. Such an identifier consists of 16 digits. It can optionally be displayed as divided into four blocks. It was developed under the auspices of the International Organization for Standardization (ISO) as Draft International Standard 27729; the valid standard was published on 15 March 2012
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Dow Gardens
Dow Gardens is a 110-acre (45 ha) botanical garden located at 1809 Eastman Avenue, Midland, Michigan, United States. It is open to the public, and currently contains over 1700 varieties of plants hardy in mid-Michigan. The main entrance has geographical coordinates of 43°37′24″N 84°14′59″W / 43.623378°N 84.249612°W / 43.623378; -84.249612. The Dow Gardens were started in 1899 by Herbert Dow, founder of The Dow Chemical Company, and gardener Elzie Côte, on eight acres (3.2 ha) of flat, sandy land. The Herbert H. Dow House is located at the southwest corner of the gardens. The Alden Dow House and Studio are on the west side of the gardens, separated by a pond. Subsequent generations of the Dow family have continued to develop the gardens. See also[edit]List of botanical gardens in the United StatesExternal links[edit]Dow GardensThis Midland County, Michigan location article is a stub
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Grace A. Dow
Grace A. Dow (/daʊ/; 1869–1953) was an American philanthropist. She is best known as the wife of Herbert H. Dow, inventor, entrepreneur and founder of Dow Chemical Company, and mother of architect Alden B. Dow.Contents1 Personal 2 Philanthropy 3 Legacy and honors 4 ReferencesPersonal[edit] She was born in Michigan as Grace A. Ball in 1869 to Arnelia and George Willard Ball, a schoolteacher and banker, respectively. In 1892, she married Herbert H. Dow in Midland, Michigan.[1] Grace and Herbert raised seven children together. She lived most of her married life in Midland, except for a short period in Cleveland, Ohio early in her husband's business career.[1] Philanthropy[edit] After her husband's death, Grace Dow founded The Herbert H. and Grace A. Dow Foundation in his memory. She served as a trustee of the Foundation until her death
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Cirrhosis
Cirrhosis
Cirrhosis
is a condition in which the liver does not function properly due to long-term damage.[1] This damage is characterized by the replacement of normal liver tissue by scar tissue.[1] Typically, the disease develops slowly over months or years.[1] Early on, there are often no symptoms.[1] As the disease worsens, a person may become tired, weak, itchy, have swelling in the lower legs, develop yellow skin, bruise easily, have fluid build up in the abdomen, or develop spider-like blood vessels on the skin.[1] The fluid build-up in the abdomen may become spontaneously infected.[1] Other complicatio
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Indianapolis 500
300-Mile International Sweepstakes
Sweepstakes
(1916) Liberty Sweepstakes
Sweepstakes
(1919)Most wins (driver) A. J. Foyt
A. J. Foyt
(4) Al Unser
Al Unser
(4) Rick Mears
Rick Mears
(4)Most wins (team) Penske (16)Most wins (manufacturer) Chassis: Dallara
Dallara
(15) Engine: Offenhauser
Offenhauser
(27)Circuit informationSurface AsphaltLength 2.5 mi (4.0 km)Turns 4Lap record 37.895 sec (237.498 mph; 382.182 km/h) (Arie Luyendyk, Reynard/Ford- Cosworth
Cosworth
XB, 1996)The Indianapolis
Indianapolis
500 is an automobile race held annually at Indianapolis Motor Speedway
Indianapolis Motor Speedway
in Speedway, Indiana, an enclave suburb of Indianapolis, Indiana
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Phenol
29.1 (in acetonitrile)[3]UV-vis (λmax) 270.75 nm[4]Dipole moment1.224 DPharmacologyATC codeC05BB05 (WHO) D08AE03 (WHO), N01BX03 (WHO), R02AA19 (WHO)HazardsSafety data sheet [1]GHS pictograms [5]GHS hazard statementsH301, H311, H314, H331, H341, H373[5]GHS precautionary statementsP261, P280, P301+310, P305+351+338, P310[5]NFPA 7042 3 0Flash point 79 °C (174 °F; 352 K)Explosive limits 1.8–8.6%[2]Lethal dose or concentration (LD, LC):LD50 (median dose)317 mg/kg (rat, oral) 270 mg/kg (mouse, oral)[6]LDLo (lowest published)420 mg/kg (rabbit, oral) 500 mg/kg (dog, oral) 80 mg/kg (cat, oral)[6]LC50 (median concentration)19 ppm (mammal) 81 ppm (rat) 69 ppm (mouse)[6]US health exposure limits (NIOSH):PEL (Permissible)TWA 5 ppm (19 mg/m3) [skin][2]REL (Recommended)TWA 5 ppm (1
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Chlorobenzene
Chlorobenzene
Chlorobenzene
is an aromatic organic compound with the chemical formula C6H5Cl. This colorless, flammable liquid is a common solvent and a widely used intermediate in the manufacture of other chemicals.[3]Contents1 Uses1.1 Historical2 Production2.1 Laboratory routes3 Safety 4 Toxicology and biodegradation 5 On other planets 6 See also 7 ReferencesUses[edit] Historical[edit] The major use of chlorobenzene is as an intermediate in the production of commodities such as herbicides, dyestuffs, and rubber. Chlorobenzene
Chlorobenzene
is also used as a high-boiling solvent in many industrial applications as well as in the laboratory.[4] Chlorobenzene is nitrated on a large scale to give a mixture of 2-nitrochlorobenzene and 4-nitrochlorobenzene, which are separated
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Magnesium
Magnesium
Magnesium
is a chemical element with symbol Mg and atomic number 12. It is a shiny gray solid which bears a close physical resemblance to the other five elements in the second column (group 2, or alkaline earth metals) of the periodic table: all group 2 elements have the same electron configuration in the outer electron shell and a similar crystal structure. Magnesium
Magnesium
is the ninth most abundant element in the universe.[4][5] It is produced in large, aging stars from the sequential addition of three helium nuclei to a carbon nucleus. When such stars explode as supernovas, much of the magnesium is expelled into the interstellar medium where it may recycle into new star systems
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World War I
Allied victoryCentral Powers' victory on the Eastern Front nullified by defeat on the Western Front Fall of the German, Russian, Ottoman, and Austro-Hungarian empires Russian Civil War
Russian Civil War
and foundation of the Soviet Union Formation of new countries in Europe
Europe
and the Middle East Transfer of German colonies
German colonies
and regions of the former Ottoman Empire to other powers Establishment of the League of Nations
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