HOME TheInfoList.com
Providing Lists of Related Topics to Help You Find Great Stuff
[::MainTopicLength::#1500] [::ListTopicLength::#1000] [::ListLength::#15] [::ListAdRepeat::#3]

picture info

Heqet
Heqet
Heqet
(Egyptian ḥqt, also ḥqtyt "Heqtit") is an Egyptian goddess of fertility, identified with Hathor, represented in the form of a frog. [1] To the Egyptians, the frog was an ancient symbol of fertility, related to the annual flooding of the Nile. Heqet
Heqet
was originally the female counterpart of Khnemu, or the wife of Khnemu by whom she became the mother of Heru-ur.[2] It has been proposed that her name is the origin of the name of Hecate, the Greek goddess of witchcraft. Name[edit]Ḥeqet in hieroglyphsḤeqtit in hieroglyphsThe name is written as ḥqt with the determinative "frog" (I7).[3] The phonetic spelling may use the biliteral ḥq hieroglyph (S38) in place of uniliteral ḥ (V28)
[...More...]

"Heqet" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Ramesses II
Ramesses II
Ramesses II
/ˈræməsiːz, ˈræmsiːz, ˈræmziːz/ (variously spelled also Rameses[5] or Ramses;[6] born c. 1303 BC; died July or August 1213 BC; reigned 1279–1213[7] BC), also known as Ramesses the Great, was the third pharaoh of the 19th Dynasty of Egypt. He is often regarded as the greatest, most celebrated, and most powerful pharaoh of the Egyptian Empire.[8] His successors and later Egyptians called him the "Great Ancestor". He is known as Ozymandias in the Greek sources,[9] from a transliteration into Greek of a part of Ramesses' throne name, Usermaatre Setepenre, "The justice of
is powerful—chosen of Rê".[10] Ramesses II
Ramesses II
led several military expeditions into the Levant, reasserting Egyptian control over Canaan. He also led expeditions to the south, into Nubia, commemorated in inscriptions at Beit el-Wali and Gerf Hussein
[...More...]

"Ramesses II" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Ptolemaic Period
The Ptolemaic Kingdom
Ptolemaic Kingdom
(/ˌtɒləˈmeɪ.ɪk/; Ancient Greek: Πτολεμαϊκὴ βασιλεία, Ptolemaïkḕ basileía)[3] was a Hellenistic
Hellenistic
kingdom based in Egypt. It was ruled by the Ptolemaic dynasty, which started with Ptolemy I
Ptolemy I
Soter's accession after the death of Alexander the Great
Alexander the Great
in 323 BC and which ended with the death of Cleopatra
Cleopatra
VII and the Roman conquest in 30 BC. The Ptolemaic Kingdom
Ptolemaic Kingdom
was founded in 305 BC by Ptolemy I
Ptolemy I
Soter, who declared himself Pharaoh
Pharaoh
of Egypt
Egypt
and created a powerful Hellenistic dynasty that ruled an area stretching from southern Syria
Syria
to Cyrene and south to Nubia
[...More...]

"Ptolemaic Period" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Early Dynastic Period Of Egypt
The Archaic or Early Dynastic Period of Egypt
Egypt
is the era immediately following the unification of Upper and Lower Egypt
Lower Egypt
c. 3100 BC. It is generally taken to include the First and Second Dynasties, lasting from the end of the Naqada III
Naqada III
archaeological period until about 2686 BC, or the beginning of the Old Kingdom.[1] With the First Dynasty, the capital moved from Thinis
Thinis
to Memphis with a unified Egypt ruled by an Egyptian god-king. Abydos remained the major holy land in the south. The hallmarks of ancient Egyptian civilization, such as art, architecture and many aspects of religion, took shape during the Early Dynastic period. Before the unification of Egypt, the land was settled with autonomous villages. With the early dynasties, and for much of Egypt's history thereafter, the country came to be known as the Two Lands
[...More...]

"Early Dynastic Period Of Egypt" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Abydos, Egypt
Abydos (Arabic: أبيدوس‎; /əˈbaɪdɒs/ Sahidic Coptic: Ⲉⲃⲱⲧ Ebōt) is one of the oldest cities of ancient Egypt, and also of the eighth nome in Upper Egypt, of which it was the capital city. It is located about 11 kilometres (6.8 miles) west of the Nile at latitude 26° 10' N, near the modern Egyptian towns of el-'Araba el Madfuna and al-Balyana. In the ancient Egyptian language, the city was called Abdju (ꜣbḏw or AbDw)
[...More...]

"Abydos, Egypt" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

Helwan
Helwan (Arabic: حلوان‎ Ḥelwān, IPA: [ħelˈwæːn], Coptic: ϩⲁⲗⲟⲩⲁⲛ, translit. Halouan[1]) is a city in Egypt and part of Greater Cairo, on the bank of the Nile, opposite the ruins of Memphis. Originally a southern suburb of Cairo, it served as the capital of the now defunct Helwan Governorate from April 2008 to April 2011, after which it was re-incorporated into the Cairo Governorate
[...More...]

"Helwan" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Stele
A stele (/ˈstiːli/ STEE-lee)[Note 1] is a stone or wooden slab, generally taller than it is wide, erected in the ancient world as a monument. Grave
Grave
steles were often used for funerary or commemorative purposes. Stelae as slabs of stone would also be used as ancient Greek and Roman government notices or as boundary markers to mark borders or property lines. The surface of the stele usually has text, ornamentation, or both. The ornamentation may be inscribed, carved in relief, or painted. Traditional Western gravestones may technically be considered the modern equivalent of ancient stelae, though the term is very rarely applied in this way
[...More...]

"Stele" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

Wepemnofret
Wepemnofret was a Royal prince of the Fourth Dynasty.[1] His father was Khufu, and mother unknown. A stela embedded in the wall of his tomb was found near the Great Pyramid of Giza, in the Giza West Field. The stele was discovered by the Hearst Expedition in 1905, and is considered to be the turning point between two artistic styles: the Archaic Style of the Fertile Period, and the Mature Style of the 4th Dynasty.[2] References[edit]^ Bunson, Margaret (2014). Encyclopedia of Ancient Egypt. Infobase Publishing. p. 431.  ^ Smith, William Stevenson (March 1963). "The Stela of Prince Wepemnofret" (PDF). ARCHAEOLOGY. 16 (1). This article about Egyptology or subjects relating to Ancient Egypt is a stub
[...More...]

"Wepemnofret" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

Osiris Myth
The Osiris myth is the most elaborate and influential story in ancient Egyptian mythology. It concerns the murder of the god Osiris, a primeval king of Egypt, and its consequences. Osiris's murderer, his brother Set, usurps his throne. Meanwhile, Osiris's wife Isis restores her husband's body, allowing him to posthumously conceive their son, Horus. The remainder of the story focuses on Horus, the product of the union of Isis and Osiris, who is at first a vulnerable child protected by his mother and then becomes Set's rival for the throne. Their often violent conflict ends with Horus's triumph, which restores order to Egypt after Set's unrighteous reign and completes the process of Osiris's resurrection. The myth, with its complex symbolism, is integral to the Egyptian conceptions of kingship and succession, conflict between order and disorder, and especially death and the afterlife
[...More...]

"Osiris Myth" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Resurrection
Resurrection
Resurrection
is the concept of coming back to life after death. In a number of ancient religions, a dying-and-rising god is a deity which dies and resurrects. The death and resurrection of Jesus, an example of resurrection, is the central focus of Christianity. As a religious concept, it is used in two distinct respects: a belief in the resurrection of individual souls that is current and ongoing (Christian idealism, realized eschatology), or else a belief in a singular resurrection of the dead at the end of the world
[...More...]

"Resurrection" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Middle Kingdom Of Egypt
The Middle Kingdom of Egypt
Egypt
(also known as The Period of Reunification) is the period in the history of ancient Egypt
Egypt
between circa 2050 BC and 1710 BC, stretching from the reunification of Egypt under the impulse of Mentuhotep II
Mentuhotep II
of the Eleventh Dynasty to the end of the Twelfth Dynasty. Some scholars also include the Thirteenth Dynasty of Egypt
Egypt
wholly into this period as well, in which case the Middle Kingdom would finish c. 1650, while others only include it until Merneferre Ay
Merneferre Ay
c. 1700 BC, last king of this dynasty to be attested in both Upper and Lower Egypt
[...More...]

"Middle Kingdom Of Egypt" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Early Dynastic Period (Egypt)
The Archaic or Early Dynastic Period of Egypt
Egypt
is the era immediately following the unification of Upper and Lower Egypt
Lower Egypt
c. 3100 BC. It is generally taken to include the First and Second Dynasties, lasting from the end of the Naqada III
Naqada III
archaeological period until about 2686 BC, or the beginning of the Old Kingdom.[1] With the First Dynasty, the capital moved from Thinis
Thinis
to Memphis with a unified Egypt ruled by an Egyptian god-king. Abydos remained the major holy land in the south. The hallmarks of ancient Egyptian civilization, such as art, architecture and many aspects of religion, took shape during the Early Dynastic period. Before the unification of Egypt, the land was settled with autonomous villages. With the early dynasties, and for much of Egypt's history thereafter, the country came to be known as the Two Lands
[...More...]

"Early Dynastic Period (Egypt)" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Westcar Papyrus
The Westcar Papyrus
Papyrus
(inventory-designation: P. Berlin 3033) is an ancient Egyptian text containing five stories about miracles performed by priests and magicians. In the text, each of these tales are told at the royal court of Pharaoh
Pharaoh
Cheops (4th dynasty) by his sons. The story in the papyrus is usually rendered in English as "King Cheops and the Magicians"[1] and "The Tale of King Cheops' Court".[2] In German, in which the text of the Westcar Papyrus
Papyrus
was first translated, it is rendered as Die Märchen des Papyrus
Papyrus
Westcar ("the fairy tales of Papyrus
Papyrus
Westcar").[3][4] The surviving material of the Westcar Papyrus
Papyrus
consists of twelve columns written in hieratic script
[...More...]

"Westcar Papyrus" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Amulet
An amulet is an object that is typically worn on one's person and is alleged to have the magical power to protect its holder, either to protect them in general or to protect them from some specific thing; it is also used for decoration. [1] Amulets are different from talismans because a talisman may have alleged magical powers other than protection.[2] Amulets are sometimes confused with pendants, small aesthetic objects that hang from necklaces. Any given pendant may indeed be an amulet but so may any other object that purports to protect its holder from danger. Potential amulets include gems, especially engraved gems, statues, coins, drawings, pendants, rings, plant parts, animal parts, and even written words in the form of a magical spell or incantation to repel evil or bad luck
[...More...]

"Amulet" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

Egyptian Lotus
Egyptian water lily or Egyptian lotus may refer to: Blue Egyptian water lily
Blue Egyptian water lily
(Nymphaea caerulea) White Egyptian water lily
White Egyptian water lily
(Nymphaea lotus)This page is an index of articles on plant species (or higher taxonomic groups) with the same common name (vernacular name)
[...More...]

"Egyptian Lotus" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

E. A. Wallis Budge
Sir Ernest Alfred Thompson Wallis Budge (27 July 1857 – 23 November 1934) was an English Egyptologist, Orientalist, and philologist who worked for the British Museum
British Museum
and published numerous works on the ancient Near East.[1] He made numerous trips to Egypt
Egypt
and the Sudan on behalf of the British Museum
British Museum
to buy antiquities, and helped it build its collection of cuneiform tablets, manuscripts, and papyri. He published many books on Egyptology, helping to bring the findings to larger audiences
[...More...]

"E. A. Wallis Budge" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
.