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Heptathlon
A heptathlon is a track and field combined events contest made up of seven events.[1] The name derives from the Greek hepta (seven) and ἄθλος (áthlos, or ἄθλον, áthlon, meaning "feat"). A competitor in a heptathlon is referred to as a heptathlete. There are two heptathlons – the women's heptathlon and the men's – composed of different events
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Maurice Greene (athlete)
Maurice Greene (born July 23, 1974) is an American former track and field sprinter who specialized in the 100 meters
100 meters
and 200 meters. He is a former 100 m world record holder with a time of 9.79 seconds. During the height of his career (1997–2004) he won four Olympic medals and was a five-time World Champion. This included three golds at the 1999 World Championships, a feat which had previously only been done by Carl Lewis
Carl Lewis
and Michael Johnson and has since been equaled by three others. His career was affected by a number of injuries from 2001 onwards, although he won the 100 meters bronze and silver in the sprint relay at the 2004 Summer Olympics. Greene was also successful indoors: he was the 1999 Indoor World Champion, was the world record holder in the 60-meter dash for nearly 20 years and remains the joint-fastest man over 50 meters. He raced sparingly after an injury in 2005 and officially retired in 2008
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Galina Chistyakova
Galina Valentinovna Chistyakova (Russian: Галина Валентиновна Чистякова, Slovak: Galina Čisťaková; born 26 July 1962) is a retired athlete who represented the Soviet Union
Soviet Union
and later Slovakia. She is the current world record holder in the long jump, jumping 7.52 metres on 11 June 1988. She is the 1988 Olympic bronze medallist and the 1989 World Indoor champion. She is also a former world record holder (pre IAAF) in the triple jump with 14.52 metres in 1989.Contents1 Biography 2 International competitions 3 Records 4 References 5 External linksBiography[edit] Born in Izmail, Ukrainian SSR, Chistyakovahe trained at Burevestnik in Moscow. Competing in long jump, Galina Chistyakova won the 1985 European Indoor Championships and a silver medal at the European Championships one year later
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Natalya Lisovskaya
Natalya Venediktovna Lisovskaya (Russian: Наталья Венедиктовна Лисовская; born 16 July 1962) is a former Soviet athlete who competed mainly in shot put. Lisovskaya trained at Spartak in Moscow. Born in Alegazy, Bashkir ASSR, Lisovskaya competed for the USSR in the 1988 Summer Olympics
1988 Summer Olympics
held in Seoul, South Korea
South Korea
where she won the gold medal. Lisovskaya holds the world record in women's shot put with a throw of 22.63 metres (74 feet 3 inches), which she achieved on 7 June 1987 in Moscow, Russia. She also has the four farthest throws of all time by a female shot putter. After her career, she gained French citizenship and competed between 1999 and 2002 at some local competitions in France. Lisovskaya married men's hammer throw world record holder Yuriy Sedykh and has one daughter, Alexia. They live in Paris, France. References[edit]^ a b c d e f g h "Nataliya Lisovskaya"
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Kendra Harrison
Kendra "Keni" Harrison (born September 18, 1992) is an American hurdler. She represented the United States
United States
at the 2015 World Championships in Athletics and the 2016 IAAF World Indoor Championships. Harrison set the world record in the women's 100 metres hurdles with a time of 12.20 seconds on July 22, 2016 at the London Müller Anniversary Games
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Petra Felke
Petra Meier (née Felke; born 30 July 1959) is a retired German track and field athlete who competed in the javelin throw. Representing East Germany, she became the Olympic Champion in 1988 and broke the world record four times between 1985 and 1988. She is the only woman to throw a javelin 80 metres or more, with her world record of 80.00 m (262 ft 5 1⁄2 in). This throw was the world record from 1988 until 1999, when a new javelin design was implemented. She also won the javelin title at the 1989 IAAF World Cup and silver medals at the World Championships in 1987 and 1991. Career[edit] Born Petra Felke
Petra Felke
in Saalfeld, Thuringia, East Germany, she trained with Ruth Fuchs
Ruth Fuchs
at SC Motor Jena. She won the silver medal in the javelin at the 1977 European Junior Championships, and went on to succeed Fuchs as her country's top javelin thrower
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Jarmila Kratochvilova
Jarmila Kratochvílová (Czech pronunciation: [ˈjarmɪla ˈkratoxviːlovaː] ( listen); born 26 January 1951, in Golčův Jeníkov)[1] is a Czech former track and field athlete.[2] She won the 400 metres and 800 metres at the 1983 World Championships, setting a world record in the 400 m.[3] In 1983, she also set the world record for the 800 metres, which still stands and which is currently the longest-standing individual world record in athletics. Only one athlete, Pamela Jelimo of Kenya, in 2008, has come within a second of Kratochvílová's mark since it was set.[4] Biography[edit] In 1983, Kratochvílová broke the 800 m world record with a time of 1:53.28. At the World Championships shortly afterwards, she won the 800 m and set a world record of 47.99 seconds to win the 400 m.[5] Kratochvílová's 1983 400-metre world record of 47.99 seconds stood for only two years until it was broken by her great rival Marita Koch in 1985
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Minute
The minute is a unit of time or angle. As a unit of time, the minute is equal to ​1⁄60 (the first sexagesimal fraction[1]) of an hour, or 60 seconds. In the UTC time standard, a minute on rare occasions has 61 seconds, a consequence of leap seconds (there is a provision to insert a negative leap second, which would result in a 59-second minute, but this has never happened in more than 40 years under this system). As a unit of angle, the minute of arc is equal to ​1⁄60 of a degree, or 60 seconds (of arc). Although not an SI unit for either time or angle, the minute is accepted for use with SI units for both.[2] The SI symbols for minute or minutes are min for time measurement, and the prime symbol after a number, e.g. 5′, for angle measurement
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1984 Summer Olympics
The 1984 Summer Olympics, officially known as the Games of the XXIII Olympiad, was an international multi-sport event that was held from July 28 to August 12, 1984, in Los Angeles
Los Angeles
(LA), California, United States. This was the second time that LA had hosted the Games, the first being in 1932. California
California
was the home state of the incumbent U.S. President Ronald Reagan, who officially opened the Games. The logo for the 1984 Games, branded "Stars in Motion", featured red, white and blue stars arranged horizontally and struck through with alternating streaks. The official mascot of the Games was Sam the Olympic Eagle
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Metre
The metre (British spelling and BIPM spelling[1]) or meter (American spelling) (from the French unit mètre, from the Greek noun μέτρον, "measure") is the base unit of length in some metric systems, including the International System of Units
International System of Units
(SI). The SI unit symbol is m.[2] The metre is defined as the length of the path travelled by light in a vacuum in 1/299 792 458 second.[1] The metre was originally defined in 1793 as one ten-millionth of the distance from the equator to the North Pole. In 1799, it was redefined in terms of a prototype metre bar (the actual bar used was changed in 1889). In 1960, the metre was redefined in terms of a certain number of wavelengths of a certain emission line of krypton-86. In 1983, the current definition was adopted. The imperial inch is defined as 0.0254 metres (2.54 centimetres or 25.4 millimetres). One metre is about ​3 3⁄8 inches longer than a yard, i.e
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Stefka Kostadinova
Stefka Georgieva Kostadinova (Bulgarian: Стефка Георгиева Костадинова; born March 25, 1965) is a Bulgarian retired athlete who competed in the high jump. Her world record of 2.09 metres has stood since 1987. She is the 1996 Olympic champion, a two-time World champion and a five-time World Indoor champion. She has been the president of the Bulgarian Olympic Committee since 2005.[2]Contents1 Early career 2 Career 3 Personal life 4 Sports administration career 5 International competitions 6 See also 7 References 8 External linksEarly career[edit] Born in Plovdiv, Kostadinova went to a specialist sports school, but was only introduced to high jump in a Year Six (12-13 year olds) athletics meet in Sofia, on a day she is quoted as saying she would never forget (on TransWorldSport interview in 2012)
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Olympics
The modern Olympic Games
Olympic Games
or Olympics (French: Jeux olympiques[1][2]) are leading international sporting events featuring summer and winter sports competitions in which thousands of athletes from around the world participate in a variety of competitions. The Olympic Games
Olympic Games
are considered the world's foremost sports competition with more than 200 nations participating.[3] The Olympic Games
Olympic Games
are held every four years, with the Summer and Winter Games alternating by occurring every four years but two years apart. Their creation was inspired by the ancient Olympic Games, which were held in Olympia, Greece, from the 8th century BC to the 4th century AD. Baron Pierre de Coubertin
Pierre de Coubertin
founded the International Olympic Committee (IOC) in 1894, leading to the first modern Games in Athens in 1896
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Second
The second is the SI base unit
SI base unit
of time, commonly understood and historically defined as 1/86,400 of a day – this factor derived from the division of the day first into 24 hours, then to 60 minutes and finally to 60 seconds each. Another intuitive understanding is that it is about the time between beats of a human heart.[nb 1] Mechanical and electric clocks and watches usually have a face with 60 tickmarks representing seconds and minutes, traversed by a second hand and minute hand. Digital clocks and watches often have a two-digit counter that cycles through seconds
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Beijing 2008
The 2008 Summer Olympic Games, officially known as the Games of the XXIX Olympiad (Chinese: 第二十九届夏季奥林匹克运动会; pinyin: Dì Èrshíjiǔ Jiè Xiàjì Àolínpǐkè Yùndònghuì) and commonly known as Beijing 2008, was an international multi-sport event that was held from 8 to 24 August 2008 in Beijing, China.[a] A total of 10,942 athletes from 204 National Olympic Committees (NOCs) competed in 28 sports and 302 events (one event more than those scheduled for the 2004 Games)
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International Association Of Athletics Federations
The International Association of Athletics Federations
International Association of Athletics Federations
(IAAF) is the international governing body for the sport of athletics. It was founded on 17 July 1912 as the International Amateur Athletic Federation by representatives from 17 national athletics federations at the organization's first congress in Stockholm, Sweden. Since October 1993, it has been headquartered in Monaco. Beginning in 1982, the IAAF
IAAF
passed several amendments to its rules to allow athletes to receive compensation for participating in international competitions. However, the organization retained the word amateur in its name until its 2001 congress, at which it changed its name to the International Association of Athletics Federations. The IAAF's president is Sebastian Coe
Sebastian Coe
of the United Kingdom
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Florence Griffith Joyner
Florence Delorez Griffith–Joyner[4] (born Florence Delorez Griffith;[1] December 21, 1959 – September 21, 1998), also known as Flo-Jo, was an American track and field athlete. She is considered the fastest woman of all time[5][6][7] based on the fact that the world records she set in 1988 for both the 100 m
100 m
and 200 m
200 m
still stand. During the late 1980s she became a popular figure in international track and field because of her record-setting performances and flashy personal style. Griffith Joyner was born and raised in California. She was athletic from a young age. She attended California
California
State University, Northridge (CSUN) and University of California, Los Angeles (UCLA) where she participated in track and field. Griffith Joyner qualified for the 100 m
100 m
1980 Olympics, although she did not actually compete due to the U.S. boycott
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