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Henry Waterhouse
Henry Waterhouse (13 December 1770 – 27 July 1812) was a British officer of the Royal Navy
Royal Navy
who is strongly associated with the early European settlement of Australia.[1] Henry Waterhouse was born at Westminster, London, England on 13 December 1770.[2] He was one of twelve children born to William Waterhouse and Susanna Brewer. His father had once been the Page of Honour to Prince Henry, Duke of Cumberland, King George III's younger brother. Henry was the Duke's godson and namesake.[3] His elder sister Elizabeth, born 14 June 1768,[2] was married to his friend and associate, naval surgeon George Bass.[3] Waterhouse joined the navy as a boy and saw service in various ships before joining the Sirius as a midshipman in 1786
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United Kingdom
The United Kingdom
United Kingdom
of Great Britain
Great Britain
and Northern Ireland, commonly known as the United Kingdom
United Kingdom
(UK) or Britain, is a sovereign country in western Europe
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Commander
Commander
Commander
is a common naval and air force officer rank. Commander
Commander
is also used as a rank or title in other formal organisations, including several police forces. Commander
Commander
is also a generic term for an officer commanding any armed forces unit, for example "platoon commander", "brigade commander" and "squadron commander"
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Special
Special
Special
or specials may refer to:Contents1 Music 2 Film and television 3 Other uses 4 See alsoMusic[edit] Special
Special
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Australian Dictionary Of Biography
The Australian Dictionary of Biography
Biography
(ADB or AuDB) is a national co-operative enterprise founded and maintained by the Australian National University (ANU) to produce authoritative biographical articles on eminent people in Australia's history. Initially published in a series of twelve hard-copy volumes between 1966 and 2005, the dictionary has been published online since 2006. The ADB project has been operating since 1957. Staff are located at the National Centre of Biography
Biography
in the History Department of the Research School of Social Sciences at the Australian National University
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Tasmania
Tasmania
Tasmania
(/tæzˈmeɪniə/;[11] abbreviated as Tas and known colloquially as Tassie) is an island state of Australia. It is located 240 km (150 mi) to the south of the Australian mainland, separated by the Bass Strait
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Rochester, Kent
Rochester (/ˈrɒtʃɪstər/ ROTCH-iss-tər) is a town and historic city in the unitary authority of Medway
Medway
in Kent, England. It is at the lowest bridging point of the River Medway
Medway
about 30 miles (50 km) from London. Rochester was for many years a favourite of Charles Dickens, who owned nearby Gads Hill Place, Higham,[1] basing many of his novels on the area
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Merino Sheep
The Merino
Merino
is an economically influential breed of sheep prized for its wool. The breed originated in Southwestern Iberia (Extremadura, Spain), but the modern Merino
Merino
was domesticated in New Zealand
New Zealand
and Australia. Today, Merinos are still regarded as having some of the finest and softest wool of any sheep
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Livestock
Livestock
Livestock
are domesticated animals raised in an agricultural setting to produce labor and commodities such as meat, eggs, milk, fur, leather, and wool. The term is sometimes used to refer solely to those that are bred for consumption, while other times it refers only to farmed ruminants, such as cattle and goats.[1] In recent years, some organizations have also raised livestock to promote the survival of rare breeds. The breeding, maintenance, and slaughter of these animals, known as animal husbandry, is a component of modern agriculture that has been practiced in many cultures since humanity's transition to farming from hunter-gatherer lifestyles. Animal
Animal
husbandry practices have varied widely across cultures and time periods. Originally, livestock were not confined by fences or enclosures, but these practices have largely shifted to intensive animal farming, sometimes referred to as "factory farming"
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Cape Colony
The Cape of Good Hope, also known as the Cape Colony
Colony
(Dutch: Kaapkolonie), was a British colony in present-day South Africa, named after the Cape of Good Hope. The British colony was preceded by an earlier Dutch colony of the same name, the Kaap de Goede Hoop, established in 1652 by the Dutch East India
India
Company. The Cape was under Dutch rule from 1652 to 1795 and again from 1803 to 1806.[4] The Dutch lost the colony to Great Britain following the 1795 Battle of Muizenberg, but had it returned following the 1802 Peace of Amiens. It was re-occupied by the UK following the Battle of Blaauwberg
Battle of Blaauwberg
in 1806, and British possession affirmed with the Anglo-Dutch Treaty of 1814. The Cape of Good Hope then remained in the British Empire, becoming self-governing in 1872, and uniting with three other colonies to form the Union of South Africa
Union of South Africa
in 1910
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Indigenous Australians
Indigenous Australians
Australians
are the Aboriginal and Torres Strait
Torres Strait
Islander people of Australia, descended from groups that existed in Australia and surrounding islands prior to British colonisation. The time of arrival of the first Indigenous Australians
Australians
is a matter of debate among researchers. The earliest definitely human remains found in Australia
Australia
are those of Mungo Man
Mungo Man
LM3 and Mungo Lady, which have been dated to around 50,000 years BP.[2] Recent archaeological evidence from the analysis of charcoal and artifacts revealing human use suggests a date as early as 65,000 B.P.[3][4] Luminescence dating has suggested habitation in Arnhem Land
Arnhem Land
as far back as 60,000 years BP.[5] Genetic research has inferred a date of habitation as early as 80,000 years BP
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Matthew Flinders
Captain Matthew Flinders
Matthew Flinders
RN (16 March 1774 – 19 July 1814) was an English navigator and cartographer, who was the leader of the first circumnavigation of Australia and identified it as a continent. Flinders made three voyages to the southern ocean between 1791 and 1810. In the second voyage, George Bass
George Bass
and Flinders confirmed that Van Diemen's Land
Van Diemen's Land
(now Tasmania) was an island. In the third voyage, Flinders circumnavigated the mainland of what was to be called Australia, accompanied by Aboriginal man Bungaree. Heading back to England in 1803, Flinders' vessel needed urgent repairs at Isle de France (Mauritius). Although Britain and France were at war, Flinders thought the scientific nature of his work would ensure safe passage, but a suspicious governor kept him under arrest for more than six years
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John Hunter (New South Wales)
Seven Years' WarRaid on Rochefort Capture of QuebecAmerican War of Independence Australian Frontier WarsBattle of Dogger Bank Relief of Gibraltar Battle of Cape SpartelFrench Revolutionary WarsGlorious First of JuneNapoleonic WarsVice Admiral John Hunter (29 August 1737 – 13 March 1821) was an officer of the Royal Navy, who succeeded Arthur Phillip
Arthur Phillip
as the second governor of New South Wales, Australia
Australia
and served as such from 1795 to 1800.[1] Both a sailor and a scholar, he explored the Parramatta River
Parramatta River
as early as 1788, and was the first to surmise that Tasmania
Tasmania
might be an island
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Officer (armed Forces)
An officer is a member of an armed force or uniformed service who holds a position of authority. In its broadest sense, the term "officer" includes non-commissioned officers and warrant officers. However, when used without further detail, the term "officer" almost always refers to commissioned officers, the more senior portion of a force who derive their authority from a commission from the head of state of a sovereign nation-state.Contents1 Numbers 2 Legal relevance 3 Terminological details in the U.S. 4 Commissioned officers4.1 United Kingdom 4.2 United States4.2.1 Other U.S. officer commissioning programs, active and discontinued4.3 Commonwealth of Nations5 Non-commissioned officers 6 Warrant officers 7 Officer ranks and accommodation 8 See also 9 References 10 External linksNumbers[edit]An Indonesian army
Indonesian army
officer serving as a ceremonial field commanderThe proportion of officers varies greatly
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Sydney
Sydney
Sydney
(/ˈsɪdni/ ( listen))[7] is the state capital of New South Wales
Wales
and the most populous city in Australia
Australia
and Oceania.[8] Located on Australia's east coast, the metropolis surrounds the world's largest natural harbour and sprawls about 70 km (43.5 mi) on its periphery towards the Blue Mountains to the west, Hawkesbury to the north and Macarthur to the south.[9] Sydney
Sydney
is made up of 658 suburbs, 40 local government areas and 15 contiguous regions
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HMS Sirius (1786)
HMS Sirius was the flagship of the First Fleet, which set out from Portsmouth, England, in 1787 to establish the first European colony in New South Wales, Australia. In 1790, the ship was wrecked on the reef, south east of Kingston Pier, in Slaughter Bay, Norfolk Island.Contents1 Construction 2 As HMS Berwick 3 Voyage of the First Fleet 4 Legacy 5 See also 6 References 7 Bibliography 8 Further reading 9 External linksConstruction[edit] Sirius
Sirius
had been converted from the merchantman Berwick. There has been confusion over the early history of Berwick
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