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Henry More
Henry More
Henry More
FRS (/ˈmɔːr/; 12 October 1614 – 1 September 1687) was an English philosopher of the Cambridge Platonist school.Contents1 Biography 2 Views 3 Influence 4 Works 5 Notes 6 References 7 External linksBiography[edit] Henry was born in Grantham, Lincolnshire on 12 October 1614.[1] He was the seventh son of Alexander More, mayor of Grantham, and Anne More (née Lacy).[1] Both his parents were Calvinists but he himself "could never swallow that hard doctrine."[citation needed] He was schooled at The King's School, Grantham
Grantham
and at Eton College. In 1631 he entered Christ's College, Cambridge, at about the time John Milton was leaving it
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Fellow Of The Royal Society
Fellowship of the Royal Society
Royal Society
(FRS, ForMemRS and HonFRS) is an award granted to individuals that the Royal Society
Royal Society
judges to have made a "substantial contribution to the improvement of natural knowled
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Matthew Hale (jurist)
Sir
Sir
Matthew Hale SL (1 November 1609 – 25 December 1676)[1] was an influential English barrister, judge and lawyer most noted for his treatise Historia Placitorum Coronæ, or The History of the Pleas of the Crown. Born to a barrister and his wife, who had both died by the time he was 5, Hale was raised by his father's relative, a strict Puritan, and inherited his faith. In 1626 he matriculated at Magdalen Hall, Oxford[2][3] (now Hertford College), intending to become a priest, but after a series of distractions was persuaded to become a barrister like his father thanks to an encounter with a Serjeant-at-Law
Serjeant-at-Law
in a dispute over his estate
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René Descartes
René Descartes
René Descartes
(/ˈdeɪˌkɑːrt/;[9] French: [ʁəne dekaʁt]; Latinized: Renatus Cartesius; adjectival form: "Cartesian";[10] 31 March 1596 – 11 February 1650) was a French philosopher, mathematician, and scientist. Dubbed the father of modern western philosophy, much of subsequent Western philosophy
Western philosophy
is a response to his writings,[11][12] which are studied closely to this day. A native of the Kingdom of France, he spent about 20 years (1629–49) of his life in the Dutch Republic
Dutch Republic
after serving for a while in the Dutch States Army of Maurice of Nassau, Prince of Orange
Prince of Orange
and the Stadtholder
Stadtholder
of the United Provinces
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Cartesian Dualism
Mind–body dualism, or mind–body duality, is a view in the philosophy of mind that mental phenomena are, in some respects, non-physical,[1] or that the mind and body are distinct and separable.[2] Thus, it encompasses a set of views about the relationship between mind and matter, and between subject and object, and is contrasted with other positions, such as physicalism and enactivism, in the mind–body problem.[1][2] Aristotle
Aristotle
shared Plato's view of multiple souls and further elaborated a hierarchical arrangement, corresponding to the distinctive functions of plants, animals, and people: a nutritive soul of growth and metabolism that all three share; a perceptive soul of pain, pleasure, and desire that only people and other animals share; and the faculty of reason that is unique to people only
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Ralph Waldo Emerson
Ralph Waldo Emerson
Ralph Waldo Emerson
(May 25, 1803 – April 27, 1882) was an American essayist, lecturer, philosopher and poet who led the transcendentalist movement of the mid-19th century. He was seen as a champion of individualism and a prescient critic of the countervailing pressures of society, and he disseminated his thoughts through dozens of published essays and more than 1,500 public lectures across the United States. Emerson gradually moved away from the religious and social beliefs of his contemporaries, formulating and expressing the philosophy of transcendentalism in his 1836 essay "Nature". Following this work, he gave a speech entitled "The American Scholar" in 1837, which Oliver Wendell Holmes Sr. considered to be America's "intellectual Declaration of Independence".[3] Emerson wrote most of his important essays as lectures first and then revised them for print
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Over-soul
"The Over-Soul" is an acclaimed essay by Ralph Waldo Emerson, first published in 1841. With the human soul as its overriding subject, several general themes are treated: (1) the existence and nature of the human soul; (2) the relationship between the soul and the personal ego; (3) the relationship of one human soul to another; and (4) the relationship of the human soul to God. Influence of Eastern religions, including Vedantism, is plainly evident, but the essay also develops ideas long present in the Western tradition, e.g., in the works of Plato, Plutarch, and Neoplatonists like Plotinus
Plotinus
and Proclus – all of whose writings Emerson read extensively throughout his career[1][2] – and Emanuel Swedenborg. The essay attempts no systematic doctrine, but rather serves as a work of art, something like poetry. Its virtue is in personal insights of the author and the lofty manner of their presentation
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Helena Blavatsky
Traditional and Christian Theosophy
Theosophy
contributorsWilliam Walker Atkinson · Franz von Baader Nikolai Berdyaev · Jakob Boehme Johann Jakob Brucker · Sergei Bulgakov Henry Corbin · Karl von Eckartshausen Florence Farr · Wassily Kandinsky G. R. S
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Isis Unveiled
Traditional and Christian Theosophy contributorsWilliam Walker Atkinson · Franz von Baader Nikolai Berdyaev · Jakob Boehme Johann Jakob Brucker · Sergei Bulgakov Henry Corbin · Karl von Eckartshausen Florence Farr · Wassily Kandinsky G. R. S. Mead · Paracelsus Ammonius Saccas · Louis Claude de Saint-Martin Vladimir Solovyov · Emanuel SwedenborgRelated topicsAlchemy · Astrology Divinatory, esoteric and occult tarot Emanationism · Esotericism · Gnosticism Mysticism · Neoplatonism and Gnosticism Occultism · Spiritualism · Transcendentalism  ·  ·  ·  ·  ·  ·Modern Theosophy Theosophical Society
Theosophical Society
FoundersHelena Blavatsky · William Quan Judge Henry Steel OlcottTheosophistsAnnie Besant · Robert Crosbie Abner Doubleday · Geoffrey Hodson Wassily Kandinsky · Archibald Keightley C. W
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Edward Conway, 3rd Viscount Conway And Killultagh
Edward Conway, 1st Earl of Conway (c. 1623 – 11 August 1683) PC, FRS, of Ragley Hall, Alcester, in Warwickshire, was an English peer and politician who served as Secretary of State for the Northern Department between 1681 and 1683.Contents1 Origins 2 Career 3 Marriages 4 Death and burial 5 Succession 6 ReferencesOrigins[edit] Conway was born circa 1623, the son and heir of Edward Conway, 2nd Viscount Conway (1594–1655) by his wife Frances Popham, daughter of Sir Francis Popham (1573–1644) MP, of Wellington in Somerset and Littlecote in Berkshire (now Wiltshire). Career[edit] He succeeded as 3rd Viscount Conway (in the Peerage of England) and 3rd Viscount Killultagh (in the Peerage of Ireland) following the death of his father in 1655. Conway became a member of the Irish Privy Council in 1660 and was a confidant of James Butler, 1st Duke of Ormonde
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Witchcraft
Witchcraft
Witchcraft
or witchery broadly means the practice of and belief in magical skills and abilities exercised by solitary practitioners and groups. Witchcraft
Witchcraft
is a broad term that varies culturally and societally, and thus can be difficult to define with precision,[1] therefore cross-cultural assumptions about the meaning or significance of the term should be applied with caution
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Spiritualism
Spiritualism
Spiritualism
is the belief that the spirits of the dead have both the ability and the inclination to communicate with the living. The afterlife, or the "spirit world", is seen by spiritualists, not as a static place, but as one in which spirits continue to evolve. These two beliefs: that contact with spirits is possible, and that spirits are more advanced than humans, lead spiritualists to a third belief, that spirits are capable of providing useful knowledge about moral and ethical issues, as well as about the nature of God
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John Norris (philosopher)
John Norris, sometimes called John Norris of Bemerton, (1657–1712) was an English theologian, philosopher and poet associated with the Cambridge Platonists.Contents1 Life 2 Works 3 References 4 External linksLife[edit] John Norris was born at Collingbourne Kingston, Wiltshire. He was educated at Winchester School, and Exeter College, Oxford, gaining a B.A. in 1680. He was later appointed a fellow of All Souls College, Oxford (M.A. 1684). He lived a quiet life as a country parson and thinker at Fugglestone St Peter with Bemerton, Wiltshire, from 1692 until his death early in 1712.[1] Works[edit] In philosophy he was a Platonist and mystic
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Inner Temple
The Honourable Society of the Inner Temple, commonly known as Inner Temple, is one of the four Inns of Court
Inns of Court
(professional associations for barristers and judges) in London. To be called to the Bar and practise as a barrister in England and Wales, an individual must belong to one of these Inns. It is located in the wider Temple area of the capital, near the Royal Courts of Justice, and within the City of London. The Inn is a professional body that provides legal training, selection, and regulation for members. It is ruled by a governing council called "Parliament", made up of the Masters of the Bench (or "Benchers"), and led by the Treasurer, who is elected to serve a one-year term. The Temple takes its name from the Knights Templar, who originally leased the land to the Temple's inhabitants (Templars) until their abolition in 1312
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John Tulloch
John Tulloch (1 June 1823 – 13 February 1886) was a Scottish theologian.[1] Life[edit] He was born at Bridge of Earn, Perthshire, and educated at the University of St Andrews and University of Edinburgh. In 1845 he became minister of St Paul's, Dundee, and in 1849 of Kettins, in Strathmore, where he remained for six years. In 1854 he was appointed Principal of St Mary's College, St Andrews. The appointment was immediately followed by the appearance of his Burnet prize essay on Theism. At St Andrews, where he was also professor of systematic theology and apologetics, his teaching was distinguished by several novel features. He lectured on comparative religion and treated doctrine historically, as being not a fixed product but a growth. Furthermore, Tulloch was appointed as one of Her Majesty's Chaplains for Scotland and preached a number of sermons before Her Majesty the Queen in Scotland between 1866 and 1876.[2] He quickly won the attachment and admiration of his students
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Johann Georg Ritter Von Zimmermann
Johann Georg Ritter
Ritter
von Zimmermann / Johann Georg Zimmermann (8 December 1728, in Brugg, Aargau – 7 October 1795, in Hanover) was a Swiss philosophical writer, naturalist, and physician.Contents1 Life and works 2 Works 3 Notes 4 References 5 Further reading 6 External linksLife and works[edit]Die Zerstörung von Lisabon (1756)He studied at Göttingen, where he took the degree of a doctor of medicine, and established his reputation by the dissertation, De irritabilitate (1751). After traveling in the Netherlands
Netherlands
and France, he practised as a physician in Brugg, and wrote Über die Einsamkeit ("Of solitude", 1756, 1784–85) and Vom Nationalstolz ("Of national pride", 1758)
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