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Henry Hughes Wilson, 1st Baronet
Field Marshal Sir Henry Hughes Wilson, 1st Baronet, GCB, DSO (5 May 1864 – 22 June 1922) was one of the most senior British Army
British Army
staff officers of the First World War
First World War
and was briefly an Irish unionist politician. Wilson served as Commandant of the Staff College, Camberley, and then as Director of Military Operations at the War Office, in which post he played a vital role in drawing up plans to deploy an Expeditionary Force to France in the event of war
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Henry Maitland Wilson, 1st Baron Wilson
Second Boer War First World WarBattle of the Somme Battle of PasschendaeleNorth-West Frontier Second World WarOperation Compass Syria-Lebanon campaign Dodecanese CampaignAwards Knight Grand Cross of the Order of the Bath[1] Knight Grand Cross of the Order of the British Empire[2] Distinguished Service Order[3] Mentioned in dispatches
Mentioned in dispatches
(5)[4] War Cross (Greece)[5] Virtuti Militari
Virtuti Militari
(Poland) [6] Distinguished Service Medal (United States)[7] Legion of Merit
Legion of Merit
(United States)[8]Other work Constable of the Tower
Constable of the Tower
of London[9]Field Marshal Henry Maitland Wilson, 1st Baron Wilson, GCB, GBE, DSO (5 September 1881 – 31 December 1964), also known as Jumbo Wilson, was a senior British Army
British Army
officer of the 20th century
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Government Of Northern Ireland
 a Lowercase "d" per here.AssemblySpeaker Robin Newton MLAActs Committees Statutory rules Members (MLA)LawSupreme Court (UK) Courts of Northern Ireland Northern Ireland
Northern Ireland
in the UKHer Majesty's Government Northern Ireland
Northern Ireland
OfficeSecretary of StateRt. Hon
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Curragh Incident
The Curragh
Curragh
incident of 20 March 1914, also known as the Curragh mutiny, occurred in the Curragh, County Kildare, Ireland. The Curragh Camp was then the main base for the British Army
British Army
in Ireland, which at the time still formed part of the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Ireland. Ireland
Ireland
was about to receive a measure of devolved government, which included Ulster. With Irish Home Rule due to become law in 1914, the British Cabinet contemplated some kind of military action against the Ulster Volunteers who threatened to rebel against it. Many officers, especially those with Irish Protestant
Protestant
connections, of whom the most prominent was Hubert Gough, threatened to resign rather than obey, privately encouraged from London by senior officers including Henry Wilson
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Ulster Volunteers
The Ulster
Ulster
Volunteers was a unionist militia founded in 1912 to block domestic self-government (or Home Rule) for Ireland, which was then part of the United Kingdom. The Ulster
Ulster
Volunteers were based in the northern province of Ulster. Many Ulster
Ulster
Protestants
Protestants
feared being governed by a Catholic-majority parliament in Dublin
Dublin
and losing their local supremacy and strong links with Britain. In 1913, the militias were organised into the Ulster
Ulster
Volunteer Force (UVF) and vowed to resist any attempts by the British Government to 'impose' Home Rule on Ulster. Later that year, Irish nationalists formed a rival militia, the Irish Volunteers, to safeguard Home Rule. In April 1914, the UVF smuggled 25,000 rifles into Ulster
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British Expeditionary Force (World War I)
247,400 (1914–1915) 2.04 million [1](1916–1918)Nickname(s) BEFEngagements See belowCommandersCommander-in-chief (1915–1918) Field Marshal Douglas HaigCommander-in-chief (1914–1915) General
General
John FrenchPrincipal battles of the British Expeditionary Force1914 Battle of Mons Battle of Le Cateau First Battle of the Marne First Battle of the Aisne Battle of La Bassée First Battle of Ypres 1915 Battle of Neuve Chapelle Second Battle of Ypres Battle of Festubert Battle of Loos 1916 Battle of the Somme Battle of Fromelles 1917 Battle of
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John French, 1st Earl Of Ypres
Field Marshal John Denton Pinkstone French, 1st Earl of Ypres, KP, GCB, OM, GCVO, KCMG, ADC, PC (28 September 1852 – 22 May 1925), known as Sir John French from 1901 to 1916, and as The Viscount French between 1916 and 1922, was a senior British Army
British Army
officer. Born in Kent to an Anglo-Irish
Anglo-Irish
family, he saw brief service as a midshipman in the Royal Navy, before becoming a cavalry officer. He achieved rapid promotion and distinguished himself on the Gordon Relief Expedition. French had a considerable reputation as a womaniser throughout his life and his career nearly ended when he was cited in the divorce of a brother officer whilst in India in the early 1890s. French became a national hero during the Second Boer War. He won the Battle of Elandslaagte
Battle of Elandslaagte
near Ladysmith, escaping under fire on the last train as the siege began
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Douglas Haig, 1st Earl Haig
Field Marshal
Field Marshal
Douglas Haig, 1st Earl Haig, KT, GCB, OM, GCVO, KCIE (/heɪɡ/; 19 June 1861 – 29 January 1928), was a senior officer of the British Army. During the First World War
First World War
he commanded the British Expeditionary Force (BEF) on the Western Front from late 1915 until the end of the war
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Sir William Robertson, 1st Baronet
Field Marshal Sir William Robert Robertson, 1st Baronet, GCB, GCMG, GCVO, DSO (29 January 1860 – 12 February 1933) was a British Army officer who served as Chief of the Imperial General Staff
Chief of the Imperial General Staff
(CIGS) – the professional head of the British Army
British Army
– from 1916 to 1918 during the First World War. As CIGS he was committed to a Western Front strategy focusing on Germany and was against what he saw as peripheral operations on other fronts. While CIGS, Robertson had increasingly poor relations with David Lloyd George, Secretary of State for War and then Prime Minister, and threatened resignation at Lloyd George's attempt to subordinate the British forces to the French Commander-in-Chief, Robert Nivelle
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Robert Nivelle
Robert Georges Nivelle (15 October 1856 – 22 March 1924) was a French artillery officer who served in the Boxer Rebellion, and the First World War. Nivelle was a very capable commander and organizer of field artillery at the regimental and divisional levels. In May 1916, he succeeded Philippe Pétain
Philippe Pétain
as commander of the French Second Army in the Battle of Verdun, leading counter-offensives that rolled back the German forces in late 1916. During these actions he and General Charles Mangin
Charles Mangin
were already accused of wasting French lives. Following the successes at Verdun, Nivelle was promoted to commander-in-chief of the French armies on the Western Front in December 1916, largely because of his persuasiveness with French and British political leaders, aided by his fluency in English
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Supreme War Council
The Supreme War Council
Supreme War Council
was a central command that coordinate Allied military strategy during World War I. It was founded in 1917, and was based in Versailles
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Irish War Of Independence
The Irish War of Independence
Irish War of Independence
(Irish: Cogadh na Saoirse)[4] or Anglo-Irish War was a guerrilla war fought from 1919 to 1921 between the Irish Republican Army
Irish Republican Army
(IRA, the army of the Irish Republic) and the British security forces in Ireland. It was an escalation of the Irish revolutionary period
Irish revolutionary period
into warfare. In April 1916, Irish republicans launched an armed uprising against British rule and proclaimed an Irish Republic. Although it was crushed after a week of fighting, the rising and the British response led to greater popular support for Irish independence. In the December 1918 election, the republican party Sinn Féin
Sinn Féin
won a landslide victory in Ireland. On 21 January 1919 they formed a breakaway government (Dáil Éireann) and declared independence from Britain
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Irish Republican Army (1922–1969)
The original Irish Republican Army
Irish Republican Army
(IRA) fought a guerrilla war against British rule in Ireland
Ireland
in the Irish War of Independence between 1919 and 1921
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Staff Officer
A military staff (often referred to as general staff, army staff, navy staff, or air staff within the individual services) is a group of officers, enlisted and civilian personnel that are responsible for the administrative, operational and logistical needs of its unit. It provides bi-directional flow of information between a commanding officer and subordinate military units
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Liverpool Street Station
Liverpool Street station, also known as London Liverpool Street,[4][5] is a central London railway terminus and connected London Underground station in the north-eastern corner of the City of London, in the ward of Bishopsgate. It is one of the busiest railway stations in London, serving as the terminus of the West Anglia Main Line
West Anglia Main Line
to Cambridge, the busier Great Eastern Main Line
Great Eastern Main Line
to Norwich, local and regional commuter trains serving east London and destinations in the East of England, and the Stansted Express
Stansted Express
service to Stansted Airport. The station opened in 1874 as a replacement for Bishopsgate
Bishopsgate
station as the Great Eastern Railway's main London terminus
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Carrickfergus
Carrickfergus
Carrickfergus
(from Irish: Carraig Fhearghais, meaning "Fergus's rock"),[3] colloquially known as "Carrick", is a large town in County Antrim, Northern Ireland. It sits on the north shore of Belfast
Belfast
Lough, 11 miles (18 km) from Belfast. The town had a population of 27,903 at the 2011 Census. It is County Antrim's oldest town and one of the oldest towns in Ireland
Ireland
as a whole.[4] Carrickfergus
Carrickfergus
was the administrative centre for Carrickfergus
Carrickfergus
Borough Council, before this was amalgamated into the Mid and East Antrim District Council
Mid and East Antrim District Council
in 2015, and forms part of the Belfast
Belfast
Metropolitan Area
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