HOME TheInfoList.com
Providing Lists of Related Topics to Help You Find Great Stuff
[::MainTopicLength::#1500] [::ListTopicLength::#1000] [::ListLength::#15] [::ListAdRepeat::#3]

picture info

Henry Flood
Henry Flood
Henry Flood
(1732 – 2 December 1791), Irish statesman, son of Warden Flood, Lord Chief Justice of the King's Bench for Ireland, was educated at Trinity College, Dublin, and afterwards at Christ Church, Oxford, where he became proficient in the classics. He was a leading Irish politician, and a friend of Henry Grattan, the leader of the Irish Patriot Party. His father was of good birth and fortune, but Henry suffered the stigma of being generally considered to be illegitimate. There is some confusion about the details but it seems that while his father and his mother Isabella Whiteside lived together as man and wife they were not legally married
[...More...]

"Henry Flood" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

Henry D. Flood
Henry De La Warr Flood (September 2, 1865 – December 8, 1921) was a Representative from the Commonwealth of Virginia
Virginia
to the United States House of Representatives, brother of U.S. Representative Joel West Flood and uncle of U.S. Senator Harry Flood Byrd.Contents1 Early and family life 2 Career 3 Death and legacy 4 See also 5 References 6 External linksEarly and family life[edit] Flood was born September 2, 1865 in "Eldon" in Appomattox County, Virginia, to former Virginia
Virginia
state senator and CSA Major Joel Walker Flood (1839-1916), and his first wife, the former Ella Faulkner (1844-1885).[1] He had an elder sister, Eleanor Bolling Flood Byrd (1864-1957), and a younger half-brother Joel West Flood (1894 -1964). Flood attended public schools in Appomattox and Richmond, Virginia
[...More...]

"Henry D. Flood" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

William Pitt, 1st Earl Of Chatham
William Pitt, 1st Earl of Chatham, PC, FRS (15 November 1708 – 11 May 1778), was a British statesman of the Whig group who led the government of Great Britain twice in the middle of the 18th century. Historians call him Pitt of Chatham, or William Pitt the Elder, to distinguish him from his son, William Pitt the Younger, who also was a prime minister. Pitt was also known as The Great Commoner, because of his long-standing refusal to accept a title until 1766. Pitt was a member of the British cabinet and its informal leader from 1756 to 1761 (with a brief interlude in 1757), during the Seven Years' War (known as the French and Indian War
French and Indian War
in the United States). He again led the ministry, holding the official title of Lord Privy Seal, between 1766 and 1768. Much of his power came from his brilliant oratory
[...More...]

"William Pitt, 1st Earl Of Chatham" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

George Townshend, 4th Viscount Townshend
Field Marshal George Townshend, 1st Marquess Townshend, PC (28 February 1724 – 14 September 1807), known as The Viscount Townshend from 1764 to 1787, was a British soldier and politician. After serving at the Battle of Dettingen
Battle of Dettingen
during the War of the Austrian Succession and the Battle of Culloden
Battle of Culloden
during the Jacobite Rising, Townshend took command of the British forces for the closing stages of the Battle of the Plains of Abraham
Battle of the Plains of Abraham
during the Seven Years' War. He went on to be Lord Lieutenant of Ireland
Lord Lieutenant of Ireland
or Viceroy where he introduced measures aimed at increasing the size of Irish regiments, reducing corruption in Ireland and improving the Irish economy. In cooperation with Prime Minister North in London
London
he imposed much greater British control over Ireland
[...More...]

"George Townshend, 4th Viscount Townshend" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

Lord Lieutenant Of Ireland
Lord Lieutenant of Ireland
Lord Lieutenant of Ireland
(UK: /lɛfˈtɛnənt/; Irish: Tiarna Leifteanant na hÉireann[1]) was the title of the chief governor of Ireland from the Williamite Wars
Williamite Wars
of 1690 till the Partition of Ireland in 1922. This spanned the Kingdom of Ireland
Kingdom of Ireland
(1541–1800) and the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Ireland
United Kingdom of Great Britain and Ireland
(1801–1922). The office, under its various names, was often more generally known as the viceroy (Irish: an Leasrí[2]), and his wife was known as the vicereine. The government of Ireland in practice was usually in the hands of the Lord Deputy up to the 17th century, and later of the Chief Secretary for Ireland
[...More...]

"Lord Lieutenant Of Ireland" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

Junius
Junius was the pseudonym of a writer who contributed a series of letters to the Public Advertiser,[1] from 21 January 1769 to 21 January 1772. The signature had been already used, apparently by him, in a letter of 21 November 1768. These and numerous other personal letters were not included in his Letters of Junius collection, published in 1772.Contents1 Choice of "Junius" as a pseudonym 2 Objectives, goals and achievements 3 Style 4 Readership 5 Identity of Junius 6 More recent use of Junius 7 See also 8 Notes 9 ReferencesChoice of "Junius" as a pseudonym[edit] The name may have been chosen because the same author had already signed Lucius and Brutus, and wished to exhaust the name of Lucius Junius Brutus, the Roman patriot who led the overthrow of the Roman monarchy. Alternatively, the name may have been derived from the Roman poet Juvenal, who was thought also to have had the nomen Junius
[...More...]

"Junius" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

Protestant
Protestantism
Protestantism
is the second largest form of Christianity
Christianity
with collectively more than 900 million adherents worldwide or nearly 40% of all Christians.[1][2][3][a] It or
[...More...]

"Protestant" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

Habeas Corpus
Habeas corpus
Habeas corpus
(/ˈheɪbiəs ˈkɔːpəs/; Medieval Latin
Medieval Latin
meaning literally "that you have the body")[1] is a recourse in law through which a person can report an unlawful detention or imprisonment to a court and request that the court order the custodian of the person, usually a prison official, to bring the prisoner to court, to determine whether the detention is lawful.[2] The writ of habeas corpus is known as "the great and efficacious writ in all manner of illegal confinement",[Note 1] being a remedy available to the meanest against the mightiest. It is a summons with the force of a court order; it is addressed to the custodian (a prison official, for example) and demands that a prisoner be taken before the court, and that the custodian present proof of authority, allowing the court to determine whether the custodian has lawful authority to detain the prisoner
[...More...]

"Habeas Corpus" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

Lord North
Frederick North, 2nd Earl of Guilford, KG, PC (13 April 1732 – 5 August 1792), more often known by his courtesy title, Lord North, which he used from 1752 until 1790, was Prime Minister of Great Britain from 1770 to 1782. He led Great Britain through most of the American War of Independence. He also held a number of other cabinet posts, including Home Secretary
Home Secretary
and Chancellor of the Exchequer. North's reputation among historians has swung back and forth. It reached its lowest point in the late nineteenth century when he was depicted as a creature of the king and an incompetent who lost the American colonies. In the early twentieth century a revisionism emphasized his strengths in administering the Treasury, handling the House of Commons, and in defending the Church of England
[...More...]

"Lord North" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

Irish Volunteers (18th Century)
The Volunteers (also known as the Irish Volunteers) were local militias raised by local initiative in Ireland in 1778
[...More...]

"Irish Volunteers (18th Century)" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

Constitution Of 1782
The Constitution of 1782
Constitution of 1782
is the series of legal changes which freed the Parliament of Ireland, a Medieval
Medieval
parliament consisting of the Irish House of Commons
Irish House of Commons
and the Irish House of Lords, of legal restrictions that had been imposed by successive Norman, English, and later, British governments on the scope of its jurisdiction. These restrictions had, in effect, allowed the Irish executive of the Lord Lieutenant of Ireland
Ireland
to control the parliamentary agenda and to restrict its ability to legislate rather than promote the objectives of the monarchy. The most constraining restrictions arose in Poynings' Law of 1495. These restrictions were lifted in 1782, producing a period of novel legislative freedom
[...More...]

"Constitution Of 1782" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

British House Of Commons
The House of Commons
House of Commons
is the lower house of the Parliament of the United Kingdom. Like the upper house, the House of Lords, it meets in the Palace of Westminster. Officially, the full name of the house is the Honourable the Commons of the United Kingdom
United Kingdom
of Great Britain
Great Britain
and Northern Ireland
Northern Ireland
in Parliament assembled. Offices however extend to Portcullis House
Portcullis House
due to shortage of space. The Commons is an elected body consisting of 650 members known as Members of Parliament (MPs). Members are elected to represent constituencies by first-past-the-post and hold their seats until Parliament is dissolved. The House of Commons
House of Commons
of England
England
evolved in the 13th and 14th centuries
[...More...]

"British House Of Commons" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

Charles James Fox
Charles James Fox
Charles James Fox
(24 January 1749 – 13 September 1806), styled The Honourable from 1762, was a prominent British Whig statesman whose parliamentary career spanned 38 years of the late 18th and early 19th centuries and who was the arch-rival of William Pitt the Younger. His father Henry, a leading Whig of his day, had similarly been the great rival of Pitt's famous father. He rose to prominence in the House of Commons as a forceful and eloquent speaker with a notorious and colourful private life, though his opinions were rather conservative and conventional
[...More...]

"Charles James Fox" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

Anthony Malone
Anthony Malone
Anthony Malone
(5 December 1700 – 8 May 1776) was an Irish lawyer and politician.Anthony MaloneLife[edit] The eldest son of Richard Malone of Baronston, County Westmeath, and Marcella, daughter of Redmond Molady, he was born on 5 December 1700; Edmund Malone
Edmund Malone
was his nephew, and a younger brother, Richard Malone (1706–1759) was M.P. for Fore from 1741. He was educated at Mr. Young's school in Abbey Street, Dublin, and on 6 April 1720 was admitted a gentleman-commoner of Christ Church, Oxford. After two years at university he entered the Middle Temple, and was called to the Irish bar
Irish bar
in May 1726. In 1737 he was created LL.D. of Trinity College, Dublin.[1] Malone made a successful career as a lawyer. From 1727 to 1760, and again from 1769 to 1776, he represented the county of Westmeath, and from 1761 to 1768 the borough of Castlemartyr, in the Irish parliament
[...More...]

"Anthony Malone" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

Edmund Burke
Edmund Burke
Edmund Burke
(/bɜːrk/; 12 January [NS] 1730[2] – 9 July 1797) was an Irish[3][4] statesman born in Dublin, as well as an author, orator, political theorist and philosopher, who after moving to London in 1750 served as a member of parliament (MP) between 1766 and 1794 in the House of Commons with the Whig Party. Burke was a proponent of underpinning virtues with manners in society and of the importance of religion in moral life.[5][page needed] These views were expressed in his A Vindication of Natural Society. Burke criticized British treatment of the American colonies, including through its taxation policies. He also supported the rights of the colonists to resist metropolitan authority, though he opposed the attempt to achieve independence
[...More...]

"Edmund Burke" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

County Kilkenny
County
County
Kilkenny
Kilkenny
(Irish: Contae Chill Chainnigh) is a county in Ireland. It is in the province of Leinster
Leinster
and is part of the South-East Region. It is named after the city[7] of Kilkenny. The county was based on the historic Gaelic kingdom of Ossory (Osraige), which is also the basis of the Diocese
Diocese
of Ossory. Kilkenny
Kilkenny
County Council is the local authority for the county
[...More...]

"County Kilkenny" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse
.