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Henri Theil
Henri (Hans) Theil (October 13, 1924 – August 20, 2000) was a Dutch econometrician, Professor at the Netherlands
Netherlands
School of Economics in Rotterdam, known for his contributions to the field of econometrics.[1][2]Contents1 Biography 2 Work 3 Publications 4 See also 5 References 6 External linksBiography[edit] Born in Amsterdam, Theil started to study mathematics and physics at Utrecht University
Utrecht University
in 1942. Later in World War II he was arrested and was imprisoned in Vught
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Netherlands
The Netherlands
The Netherlands
(/ˈnɛðərləndz/ ( listen); Dutch: Nederland [ˈneːdərˌlɑnt] ( listen)), also known informally as Holland, is a country in Western Europe
Europe
with a population of seventeen million
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Entropy
In statistical mechanics, entropy (usual symbol S) is related to the number of microscopic configurations Ω that a thermodynamic system can have when in a state as specified by some macroscopic variables. Specifically, assuming for simplicity that each of the microscopic configurations is equally probable, the entropy of the system is the natural logarithm of that number of configurations, multiplied by the Boltzmann constant
Boltzmann constant
kB. Formally, S = k B ln ⁡ Ω  (assuming equiprobable states) . displaystyle S=k_ mathrm B ln Omega text (assuming equiprobable states) . This is consistent with 19th-century formulas for entropy in terms of heat and temperature, as discussed below
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JSTOR
JSTOR
JSTOR
(/ˈdʒeɪstɔːr/ JAY-stor;[3] short for Journal Storage) is a digital library founded in 1995. Originally containing digitized back issues of academic journals, it now also includes books and primary sources, and current issues of journals.[4] It provides full-text searches of almost 2,000 journals.[5] As of 2013, more than 8,000 institutions in more than 160 countries had access to JSTOR;[5] most access is by subscription, but some older public domain content is freely available to anyone.[6] JSTOR's revenue was $69 million in 2014.[7]Contents1 History 2 Content 3 Access3.1 Aaron Swartz
Aaron Swartz
incident 3.2 Limitations 3.3 Increasing public access4 Use 5 See also 6 References 7 Further reading 8 External linksHistory[edit] William G
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Economic Forecasting
Forecasting is the process of making predictions of the future based on past and present data and most commonly by analysis of trends. A commonplace example might be estimation of some variable of interest at some specified future date. Prediction is a similar, but more general term. Both might refer to formal statistical methods employing time series, cross-sectional or longitudinal data, or alternatively to less formal judgmental methods. Usage can differ between areas of application: for example, in hydrology the terms "forecast" and "forecasting" are sometimes reserved for estimates of values at certain specific future times, while the term "prediction" is used for more general estimates, such as the number of times floods will occur over a long period. Risk and uncertainty are central to forecasting and prediction; it is generally considered good practice to indicate the degree of uncertainty attaching to forecasts
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Digital Object Identifier
In computing, a Digital Object Identifier or DOI is a persistent identifier or handle used to uniquely identify objects, standardized by the International Organization for Standardization
International Organization for Standardization
(ISO).[1] An implementation of the Handle System,[2][3] DOIs are in wide use mainly to identify academic, professional, and government information, such as journal articles, research reports and data sets, and official publications though they also have been used to identify other types of information resources, such as commercial videos. A DOI aims to be "resolvable", usually to some form of access to the information object to which the DOI refers. This is achieved by binding the DOI to metadata about the object, such as a URL, indicating where the object can be found. Thus, by being actionable and interoperable, a DOI differs from identifiers such as ISBNs and ISRCs which aim only to uniquely identify their referents
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Special
Special
Special
or specials may refer to:Contents1 Music 2 Film and television 3 Other uses 4 See alsoMusic[edit] Special
Special
(album), a 1992 album by Vesta Williams "Special" (Garb
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International Standard Book Number
"ISBN" redirects here. For other uses, see ISBN (other).International Standard Book
Book
NumberA 13-digit ISBN, 978-3-16-148410-0, as represented by an EAN-13 bar codeAcronym ISBNIntroduced 1970; 48 years ago (1970)Managing organisation International ISBN AgencyNo. of digits 13 (formerly 10)Check digit Weighted sumExample 978-3-16-148410-0Website www.isbn-international.orgThe International Standard Book
Book
Number (ISBN) is a unique[a][b] numeric commercial book identifier. Publishers purchase ISBNs from an affiliate of the International ISBN Agency.[1] An ISBN is assigned to each edition and variation (except reprintings) of a book. For example, an e-book, a paperback and a hardcover edition of the same book would each have a different ISBN. The ISBN is 13 digits long if assigned on or after 1 January 2007, and 10 digits long if assigned before 2007
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Patrick Suppes
Patrick Colonel Suppes (/ˈsʊpɪs/; March 17, 1922 – November 17, 2014) was an American philosopher who made significant contributions to philosophy of science, the theory of measurement, the foundations of quantum mechanics, decision theory, psychology and educational technology. He was the Lucie Stern Professor of Philosophy Emeritus at Stanford University and until January 2010 was the Director of the Education Program for Gifted Youth also at Stanford.Contents1 Early life and career 2 Work2.1 Computer-aided learning 2.2 Decision theory3 Awards and honors 4 Works 5 See also 6 References 7 External linksEarly life and career[edit] Suppes was born on March 17, 1922, in Tulsa, Oklahoma. He grew up as an only child, later with a half brother George who was born in 1943 after Patrick had entered the army. His grandfather, C.E. Suppes, had moved to Oklahoma from Ohio. Suppes' father and grandfather were independent oil men. His mother died when he was a young boy
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Samuel Karlin
Samuel Karlin (June 8, 1924 – December 18, 2007) was an American mathematician at Stanford University in the late 20th century.Contents1 Biography 2 Selected publications 3 See also 4 References 5 External linksBiography[edit] Karlin was born in Janów, Poland and immigrated to Chicago as a child. Raised in an Orthodox Jewish household, Karlin became an atheist in his teenage years and remained an atheist for the rest of his life.[3] Karlin earned his undergraduate degree from Illinois Institute of Technology; and then his doctorate in mathematics from Princeton University in 1947 (at the age of 22) under the supervision of Salomon Bochner
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Econometrics
Econometrics
Econometrics
is the application of statistical methods to economic data and is described as the branch of economics that aims to give empirical content to economic relations.[1] More precisely, it is "the quantitative analysis of actual economic phenomena based on the concurrent development of theory and observation, related by appropriate methods of inference".[2] An introductory economics textbook describes econometrics as allowing economists "to sift through mountains of data to extract simple relationships".[3] The first known use of the term "econometrics" (in cognate form) was by Polish econom
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Hope College
Coordinates: 42°47′13″N 86°6′8″W / 42.78694°N 86.10222°W / 42.78694; -86.10222Hope CollegeSeal of Hope CollegeMotto Spera in Deo (Latin)Motto in EnglishHope in GodType Private liberal arts collegeEstablished 1866Affiliation Reformed Church in AmericaEndowment $203.3 million (2015)[1]President Dennis N. Voskuil (interim)Provost Cady Short-Thompson, Ph.D.Administrative staff550Undergraduates 3,224 (fall 2016) [2]Location Holland, Michigan, U.S.Campus Suburban, 125 acres (0.195 sq mi)Athletics NCAA Division III — MIAAColors Orange and blue          Nickname Flying Dutchmen[3] Flying DutchMascot DutchWebsite www.hope.eduHope College is a private, Christian liberal arts college in downtown Holland, Michigan, United States, near Lake Macatawa and a few miles from Lake Michigan
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Robust Regression
In robust statistics, robust regression is a form of regression analysis designed to overcome some limitations of traditional parametric and non-parametric methods. Regression analysis
Regression analysis
seeks to find the relationship between one or more independent variables and a dependent variable. Certain widely used methods of regression, such as ordinary least squares, have favourable properties if their underlying assumptions are true, but can give misleading results if those assumptions are not true; thus ordinary least squares is said to be not robust to violations of its assumptions. Robust regression
Robust regression
methods are designed to be not overly affected by violations of assumptions by the underlying data-generating process. In particular, least squares estimates for regression models are highly sensitive to (not robust against) outliers
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Serge-Christophe Kolm
Serge-Christophe Kolm (born December 1932) is a French economist. His work in economics and related social science includes his analyses, concepts and results in Public Economics and Normative Economics (hence also social ethics and political philosophy), and in other fields and problems often applying them.Contents1 Biography 2 Work2.1 Public economics 2.2 Normative economics 2.3 Reciprocity and giving 2.4 Transitions 2.5 Financial and monetary choices and macroeconomic policy 2.6 Economic psychology 2.7 Contributed volumes on Kolm's works3 External links 4 ReferencesBiography[edit] Born in Paris in December 1932, Serge Kolm studied at the Ecole Polytechnique where his rank permitted him to join the civil service body of the Corps des Ponts et Chaussées (which has a long tradition of applied and theoretical economic research)
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Royal Netherlands Academy Of Arts And Sciences
The Royal Netherlands
Netherlands
Academy of Arts and Sciences (Dutch: Koninklijke Nederlandse Akademie van Wetenschappen, abbreviated: KNAW) is an organization dedicated to the advancement of science and literature in the Netherlands. The Academy is housed in the Trippenhuis
Trippenhuis
in Amsterdam. In addition to various advisory and administrative functions it operates a number of research institutes and awards many prizes, including the Lorentz Medal
Lorentz Medal
in theoretical physics, the Dr Hendrik Muller Prize for Behavioural and Social Science
Science
and the Heineken Prizes.Contents1 Main functions 2 Members and organization 3 History 4 Research institutes 5 Young Academy 6 See also 7 References 8 External linksMain functions[edit] The Academy advises the Dutch government on scientific matters
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Vrije Universiteit Brussel
The Vrije Universiteit Brussel
Vrije Universiteit Brussel
 listen (help·info) is a Dutch-speaking university located in Brussels, Belgium.[5] It has four campuses: Brussels
Brussels
Humanities, Science and Engineering Campus (in Ixelles), Brussels
Brussels
Health Campus (in Jette), Brussels
Brussels
Technology Campus (in Anderlecht) and Brussels
Brussels
Photonics Campus (in Gooik).[6] The university's name is sometimes abbreviated by "VUB" or translated to "Free University of Brussels"
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