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Hellenistic Culture
The Hellenistic
Hellenistic
period covers the period of Mediterranean
Mediterranean
history between the death of Alexander the Great
Alexander the Great
in 323 BC and the emergence of the Roman Empire
Roman Empire
as signified by the Battle of Actium
Battle of Actium
in 31 BC[1] and the subsequent conquest of Ptolemaic Egypt
Egypt
the following year.[2] The Ancient Greek
Ancient Greek
word Hellas (Ἑλλάς, Ellás) is the original word for Greece, from which the word "Hellenistic" was derived.[3] At this time, Greek cultural influence and power was at its peak in Europe, North Africa
North Africa
and Western Asia, experiencing prosperity and progress in the arts, exploration, literature, theatre, architecture, music, mathematics, philosophy, and science
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Nike Of Samothrace
The Winged Victory of Samothrace, also called the Nike of Samothrace,[2] is a marble Hellenistic sculpture
Hellenistic sculpture
of Nike (the Greek goddess of victory), that was created about the 2nd century BC. Since 1884, it has been prominently displayed at the Louvre
Louvre
and is one of the most celebrated sculptures in the world. H.W
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Economic History Of Greece And The Greek World
The economic history of the Greek World spans several millennia and encompasses many modern-day nation states. Since the focal point of the center of the Greek World often changed it is necessary to enlarge upon all these areas as relevant to the time
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Second Hellenic Republic
The Second Hellenic Republic
Second Hellenic Republic
(Greek: Βʹ Ελληνική Δημοκρατία) is the modern historiographical term for the political regime of Greece
Greece
between 24 March 1924 and 10 October 1935, which at the time was simply known as the Hellenic Republic (Greek: Ἑλληνικὴ Δημοκρατία). It followed from the period of the constitutional monarchy under the monarchs of the House of Glücksburg, and lasted until its overthrow in a military coup d'état which restored the monarchy. The Second Republic marks the second period in modern Greek history where Greece
Greece
was not headed by a king, with the assemblies and provisional governments of the Greek Revolution
Greek Revolution
being regarded as the First Republic
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4th Of August Regime
The 4th of August Regime
4th of August Regime
(Greek: Καθεστώς της 4ης Αυγούστου, Kathestós tis tetártis Avgoústou), commonly also known as the Metaxas Regime (Greek: Καθεστώς Μεταξά, Kathestós Metaxá), was a totalitarian regime under the leadership of General
General
Ioannis Metaxas
Ioannis Metaxas
that ruled the Kingdom of Greece from 1936 to 1941. It took its name from a self-coup carried out by Metaxas, with the support of King George II, on 4 August 1936. Metaxas presided over a conservative authoritarian and staunchly anti-communist government. The regime took inspiration in its symbolism and rhetoric from Fascist Italy, but never developed into a fully-fledged fascist dictatorship, and retained close links to Britain and France, rather than the Axis powers. Lacking a popular base, after Metaxas' death in January 1941 the regime hinged entirely on the King
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Axis Occupation Of Greece
The occupation of Greece
Greece
by the Axis Powers
Axis Powers
(Greek: Η Κατοχή, I Katochi, meaning "The Occupation") began in April 1941 after Nazi Germany invaded Greece
Greece
to assist its ally, Fascist Italy, which had been at war with Greece
Greece
since October 1940. Following the conquest of Crete, all of Greece
Greece
was occupied by June 1941. The occupation in the mainland lasted until Germany and its ally Bulgaria
Bulgaria
were forced to withdraw under Allied pressure in early October 1944
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Hellenic State (1941–44)
The Hellenic State (Greek: Ελληνική Πολιτεία, Elliniki Politeia, also translated as Greek State[1]) was the collaborationist government of Greece
Greece
during the country's occupation by the Axis powers in the Second World War.Contents1 History 2 Government and politics 3 Military 4 Administrative divisions 5 References 6 External linksHistory[edit] After the fall of Greece, General Georgios Tsolakoglou
Georgios Tsolakoglou
was appointed as Prime minister of the new Greek government on April 30, 1941. As King George II had left the country with the legitimate Greek government in exile, the new regime avoided all reference to the Greek monarchy and used Hellenic State as the country's official, generic, name
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Greek Civil War
 Kingdom of Greece Hellenic ArmySupported by:   United Kingdom
United Kingdom
(before 1947)   United States
United States
(after 1947) Pr
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Greek Military Junta Of 1967–74
The Greek military junta of 1967–1974, commonly known as the Regime of the Colonels (Greek: καθεστώς των Συνταγματαρχών, kathestós ton Syntagmatarchón [kaθesˈtos ton sin'daɣ.matarˈxon]), or in Greece
Greece
simply The Junta (/ˈdʒʌntə/ or /ˈhʊntə/; Greek: Χούντα [ˈxunda]), The Dictatorship
Dictatorship
(Η Δικτατορία, I Diktatoría) and The Seven Years (Η Επταετία, I Eptaetía), was a series of far-right military juntas that ruled Greece
Greece
following the 1967 Greek coup d'état led by a group of colonels on 21 April 1967. The dictatorship ended on 24 July 1974 under the pressure of the Turkish invasion of Cyprus
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Third Hellenic Republic
Third Hellenic Republic
Third Hellenic Republic
(Greek: Γ΄ Ελληνική Δημοκρατία) is the period in modern Greek history that stretches from 1974, with the fall of Greek military junta and the final abolition of the Greek monarchy, to the present day. It is considered the third period of republican rule in Greece, following the First Republic during the Greek War of Independence (1821–32) and the Second Republic during the temporary abolition of the monarchy in 1924–35. The term "Metapolitefsi" (Μεταπολίτευση) is commonly used for this period, but this term concerns more often with the first years immediately after the fall of the military junta
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Greek Art
Greek art
Greek art
began in the Cycladic and Minoan civilization, and gave birth to Western classical art in the subsequent Geometric, Archaic and Classical periods (with further developments during the Hellenistic
Hellenistic
Period). It absorbed influences of Eastern civilizations, of Roman art and its patrons, and the new religion of Orthodox Christianity in the Byzantine era and absorbed Italian and European ideas during the period of Romanticism
Romanticism
(with the invigoration of the Greek Revolution), until the Modernist
Modernist
and Postmodernist
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Constitutional History Of Greece
In the modern history of Greece, starting from the Greek War of Independence, the Constitution of 1975/1986/2001 is the last in a series of democratically adopted Constitutions (with the exception of the Constitutions of 1968 and 1973 imposed by a dictatorship).Contents1 Greek War of Independence 2 From the absolute to the constitutional monarchy (1833–1924) 3 The Second Hellenic Republic
Second Hellenic Republic
and the Restoration (1925–1941) 4 The Kingdom of
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Military History Of Greece
The military history of Greece
Greece
is the history of the wars and battles of the Greek people in Greece, the Balkans
Balkans
and the Greek colonies in the
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Hellenistic Art
Hellenistic
Hellenistic
art is the art of the period in classical antiquity generally taken to begin with the death of Alexander the Great
Alexander the Great
in 323 BC and end with the conquest of the Greek world by the Romans, a process well underway by 146 BCE, when the Greek mainland was taken, and essentially ending in 31 BCE with the conquest of Ptolemaic Egypt following the Battle of Actium. A number of the best-known works of Greek sculpture
Greek sculpture
belong to this period, including Laocoön
Laocoön
and His Sons, Venus de Milo, and the Winged Victory of Samothrace
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Names Of The Greeks
The Greeks
Greeks
(Greek: Έλληνες) have been identified by many ethnonyms. The most common native ethnonym is "Hellen" (Ἕλλην), pl. Hellenes
Hellenes
(Ἕλληνες); the name "Greeks" (Latin: Graeci) was used by the Ancient Romans and gradually entered the European languages through its use in Latin. The mythological patriarch Hellen is the named progenitor of the Greek peoples; his descendants the Aeolians, Dorians, Achaeans and Ionians
Ionians
correspond to the main Greek tribes and to the main dialects spoken in Greece
Greece
and Asia Minor (Anatolia). Among his descendants are also mentioned the Graeci and the Makedones. The first Greek-speaking people, called Myceneans
Myceneans
or Mycenean-Achaeans by historians, entered present-day Greece
Greece
sometime in the Neolithic era or the Bronze Age
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History Of The Mediterranean Region
The Mediterranean Sea
Mediterranean Sea
was the central superhighway of transport, trade and cultural exchange between diverse peoples encompassing three continents: Western Asia, North Africa, and Southern Europe
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