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Heath, Massachusetts
Heath is a town in Franklin County, Massachusetts, United States. The population was 706 at the 2010 census.[1] It is part of the Springfield, Massachusetts
Massachusetts
Metropolitan Statistical Area.Contents1 History 2 Geography 3 Demographics 4 Government 5 Education 6 Notable people 7 References 8 External linksHistory[edit]Burnt Hill Stone Circle, a Pre-Columbian
Pre-Columbian
site in HeathHeath was first settled in 1765 as a part of Charlemont. The town, as well as neighboring Rowe, separated, and Heath was officially incorporated in 1785, just a few days after its new neighbor. The town is named after William Heath, Major General of Massachusetts
Massachusetts
and Brigadier General in the national army during the American Revolution.[2] General Heath had been the commanding officer and friend of Col
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New England Town
New England
New England
(United States):Connecticut Maine Massachusetts New Hampshire Rhode Island VermontFound in U.S. states in New EnglandCreated by Various colonial agreements followed by state constitutionsCreated 1620 (Plymouth, Massachusetts)Number More than 1,500 (as of 2016)Populations 41 (Hart's Location, New Hampshire) - 68,318 (Framingham, Massachusetts)Areas 1.2 sq mi. (Nahant, Massachusetts) - 291.2 sq mi. (Pittsburg, New Hampshire)Government Town meetingThis article has multiple issues. Please help improve it or discuss these issues on the talk page. (Learn how and when to remove these template messages)This article needs additional citations for verification. Please help improve this article by adding citations to reliable sources. Unsourced material may be challenged and removed. (April 2017) (Learn how and when to remove this template message)This article possibly contains original research
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Labor Day
Labor Day
Labor Day
in the United States
United States
is a public holiday celebrated on the first Monday in September. It honors the American labor movement and the contributions that workers have made to the strength, prosperity, laws and well-being of the country. It is the Monday of the long weekend known as Labor Day
Labor Day
Weekend and it is considered the unofficial end of summer in the United States. It is recognized as a federal holiday. Beginning in the late 19th century, as the trade union and labor movements grew, trade unionists proposed that a day be set aside to celebrate labor. "Labor Day" was promoted by the Central Labor Union and the Knights of Labor, which organized the first parade in New York City. In 1887, Oregon
Oregon
was the first state of the United States
United States
to make it an official public holiday
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Congregational Church
Congregational churches (also Congregationalist churches; Congregationalism) are Protestant churches in the Reformed tradition practicing congregationalist church governance, in which each congregation independently and autonomously runs its own affairs. In the United States and the United Kingdom, many Congregational churches claim their descent from Protestant denominations formed on a theory of union published by the theologian and English separatist Robert Browne in 1582.[1] Ideas of nonconforming Protestants during the Puritan
Puritan
Reformation
Reformation
of the Church of England
Church of England
laid foundation for these churches. In England, the early Congregationalists were called Separatists or Independents to distinguish them from the similarly Calvinistic Presbyterians, whose churches embrace a polity based on the governance of elders
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Yale College
Yale College
Yale College
is the undergraduate liberal arts college of Yale University. Founded in 1701, it is the original school of the university. Although other schools of the university were founded as early as 1810, all of Yale was officially known as Yale College
Yale College
until 1887, when its schools were confederated and the institution was renamed Yale University. Originally established to train Congregationalist ministers, the college began teaching humanities and natural sciences by the late 18th century. At the same time, students began organizing extracurricular organizations, first literary societies, and later publications, sports teams, and singing groups. By the mid-19th century, it was the largest college in the United States. In 1847, it was joined by another undergraduate degree-granting school at Yale, the Sheffield Scientific School, which was absorbed into the college in the mid-20th century
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Yale Theological Seminary
The School of Divinity at Yale University, in New Haven, Connecticut is one of twelve graduate or professional schools within Yale University. Congregationalist
Congregationalist
theological education was the motivation at the founding of Yale, and the professional school has its roots in a Theological Department established in 1822. The school had maintained its own campus, faculty, and degree program since 1869, and it has become more ecumenical beginning in the mid-19th century. Since the 1970s it has been affiliated with the Episcopal Berkeley Divinity School and has housed the Institute of Sacred Music, which offers separate degree programs
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Stratford, Connecticut
Stratford is a town in Fairfield County, Connecticut, United States. It is situated on Long Island Sound
Long Island Sound
along Connecticut's "Gold Coast" at the mouth of the Housatonic River. Stratford is in the Bridgeport-Stamford-Norwalk Metropolitan Statistical Area. It was founded by Puritans
Puritans
in 1639. The population was 51,384 as of the 2010 census.[1] It has a historical legacy in aviation, the military, and theater
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The Emancipator
The Emancipator was an American newspaper founded in 1819 by Elihu Embree[1], the son of a Quaker
Quaker
minister, as the Manumission Intelligencier, and was an abolitionist newspaper in Jonesborough, Tennessee.[1]Contents1 History 2 Dedication 3 Reprint 4 Further newspapers 5 See also 6 Literature 7 ReferencesHistory[edit] It was published from April 1820 to October 1820, when publication ceased due to Embree's illness,[1] and then sold to Benjamin Lundy
Benjamin Lundy
in 1821, when it became The Genius of Universal Emancipation. The editor was Theodore Dwight Weld. Dedication[edit] The Emancipator was devoted to the abolition of slavery, in this, it was the first newspaper in the United States[1] Reprint[edit] The Emancipator was reprinted by B. H
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Underground Railroad
The Underground Railroad
Underground Railroad
was a network of secret routes and safe houses established in the United States
United States
during the early to
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Southern United States
The Southern United States, also known as the American South, Dixie, Dixieland and the South, is a region of the United States
United States
of America. The South does not fully match the geographic south of the United States but is commonly defined as including the states that fought for the Confederate States of America
Confederate States of America
in the American Civil War.[2] The Deep South
Deep South
is fully located in the southeastern corner
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The Carolinas
The Carolinas
The Carolinas
are the U.S. states
U.S. states
of North Carolina
North Carolina
and South Carolina, considered collectively. It is bordered by Virginia
Virginia
to the north, Tennessee
Tennessee
to the west, and Georgia to the southwest. The Atlantic Ocean
Atlantic Ocean
is to the east. Charlotte
Charlotte
is the Carolinas' largest city. The largest metropolitan area is the Charlotte
Charlotte
metropolitan area, which also includes Uptown Charlotte
Charlotte
and Rock Hill (the fifth-largest city in South Carolina). Combining North Carolina's population of 10,042,802 and South Carolina's of 4,896,146, the Carolinas have a population of 14,938,948 as of 2015
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United States Census Bureau
The United States
United States
Census
Census
Bureau (USCB; officially the Bureau of the Census, as defined in Title 13 U.S.C. § 11) is a principal agency of the U.S. Federal Statistical System, responsible for producing data about the American people and economy. The Census Bureau is part of the U.S. Department of Commerce
Department of Commerce
and its director is appointed by the President of the United States. The Census
Census
Bureau's primary mission is conducting the U.S. Census every ten years, which allocates the seats of the U.S
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Battle Of Bunker Hill
United ColoniesConnecticut Massachusetts New Hampshire Rhode Island Great BritainCommanders and leaders William Prescott Israel Putnam Joseph Warren † John Stark William Howe Thomas Gage Sir Robert Pigot James Abercrombie † Henry Clinton Samuel Graves John Pitcairn †Strength~2,400[3] 3,000+[4]Casualties and losses115 killed, 305 wounded, 30 captured (20 POWs died) Total: 450[5] 19 officers killed 62 officers wounded 207 soldiers killed 766 soldiers wounded Total: 1,054[6]The Battle of Bunker Hill
Battle of Bunker Hill
was fought on June 17, 1775, during the Siege of Boston
Siege of Boston
in the early stages of the American Revolutionary War. The battle is named after Bunker Hill in Charlestown, Massachusetts, which was peripherally involved in the battle
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Vermont
Vermont
Vermont
(/vərˈmɒnt, vɜːr-/ ( listen))[8][a] is a state in the New England
New England
region of the Northeastern United States. It borders the U.S. states of Massachusetts
Massachusetts
to the south, New Hampshire to the east and New York to the west, and the Canadian province of Quebec
Quebec
to the north. Lake Champlain
Lake Champlain
forms half of Vermont's western border with New York. The Green Mountains
Green Mountains
run north-south for the length of the state. Vermont
Vermont
is the second smallest by population and the sixth smallest by area of the 50 U.S. states. The state capital is Montpelier, the least populous state capital in the United States. The most populous city, Burlington, is the least populous city to be the most populous city in a state
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Windham County, Vermont
Windham County is a county located in the state of Vermont, in the United States. As of the 2010 census, the population was 44,513.[1] The county's shire town (seat) is Newfane,[2] and the largest municipality is Brattleboro. The county is known for its counterculture.[citation needed]Contents1 History 2 Geography2.1 Adjacent counties 2.2 Reservoirs 2.3 National protected areas3 Demographics3.1 2000 census 3.2 2010 census4 Politics and government 5 County law enforcement 6 Transportation6.1 Roads and highways 6.2 Bus 6.3 Rail7 Communities7.1 Towns 7.2 Villages7.2.1 Census-designated places 7.2.2 Other villages8 See also 9 References 10 External linksHistory[edit] Fort Bridgman, Vernon, was burned in 1755, a casualty of the French and Indian War.[3] The Court of Common Pleas (established 1768) of the County of Cumberland (established July 3, 1766) of the Province of New York was moved to the town of Westminster in 1772
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Whitingham, Vermont
Whitingham is a town in Windham County, Vermont, United States. The town was named for Nathan Whiting, a landholder.[3] The population was 1,357 at the 2010 census
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