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Hatamoto
A hatamoto (旗本, "under the banners") was a samurai in the direct service of the Tokugawa shogunate
Tokugawa shogunate
of feudal Japan.[1] While all three of the shogunates in Japanese history had official retainers, in the two preceding ones, they were referred to as gokenin. However, in the Edo
Edo
period, hatamoto were the upper vassals of the Tokugawa house,[2] and the gokenin were the lower vassals. There was no precise difference between the two in terms of income level, but hatamoto had the right to an audience with the shōgun, whereas gokenin did not.[3] The word hatamoto literally means "at the base of the flag", and is often translated into English as "bannerman"
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Security
Security
Security
is freedom from, or resilience against, potential harm (or other unwanted coercive change) from external forces. Beneficiaries (technically referents) of security may be persons and social groups, objects and institutions, ecosystems, and any other entity or phenomenon vulnerable to unwanted change by its environment.Refugees fleeing war and insecurity in Iraq and Syria arrive at Lesbos Island, supported by Spanish volunteers, 2015 Security
Security
mostly refers to protection from hostile forces, but it has a wide range of other senses: for example, as the absence of harm (e.g. freedom from want); as the presence of an essential good (e.g. food security); as resilience against potential damage or harm (e.g. secure foundations); as secrecy (e.g. a secure telephone line); as containment (e.g
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Toki Clan
The Toki clan
Toki clan
(土岐氏, Toki-shi) is a Japanese kin group.[1]Contents1 History1.1 Cadet branches2 Select list2.1 Pre-Mino ancestors 2.2 Initial Mino rulers 2.3 Shugo of Mino Province3 ReferencesHistory[edit] The Toki claim descent from
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Shugo
Shugo (守護) was a title, commonly translated as "(military) governor", "protector" or "constable", given to certain officials in feudal Japan. They were each appointed by the shōgun to oversee one or more of the provinces of Japan. The position gave way to the emergence of the daimyōs (feudal lords) in the late 15th century, as shugo began to claim power over lands themselves, rather than serving simply as governors on behalf of the shogunate. The post is said to have been created in 1185 by Minamoto no Yoritomo to aid the capture of Yoshitsune, with the additional motivation of extending the rule of the shogunate government throughout Japan. The shugo (military governors) progressively supplanted the existing kokushi (civil governors), who were appointed by the Imperial Court in Kyoto
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Akamatsu Clan
Akamatsu clan
Akamatsu clan
(赤松氏, Akamatsu-shi) is a Japanese samurai family of direct descent from Minamoto no Morifusa of the Murakami-Genji.[1]Contents1 History 2 Select members of the clan 3 See also 4 Notes 5 ReferencesHistory[edit] They were prominent shugo-daimyō in Harima during the Sengoku period. During the Ōnin no ran (1467-1477), Akamatsu Masanori was one of the chief generals of the Hosokawa clan.[2] The head of the clan at Shizuoka in Suruga Province
Suruga Province
became a kazoku baron in 1887.[1] The Shinmen clan were a branch of the Akamatsu.[3] Select members of the clan[edit]Akamatsu grave markers at HarimaThis is a dynamic list and may never be able to satisfy particular standards for completeness
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Hatakeyama Clan
The Hatakeyama clan
Hatakeyama clan
(Japanese: 畠山氏, Hepburn: Hatakeyama-shi) was a Japanese samurai clan. Originally a branch of the Taira clan
Taira clan
and descended from Taira no Takamochi, they fell victim to political intrigue in 1205, when Hatakeyama Shigeyasu, first, and his father Shigetada later were killed in battle by Hōjō forces in Kamakura. After 1205 the Hatakeyama came to be descendants of the Ashikaga clan, who were in turn descended from Emperor Seiwa
Emperor Seiwa
(850–880) and the Seiwa Genji
Seiwa Genji
branch of the Minamoto clan.Contents1 History 2 Sengoku period 3 Selected clan members of note 4 Known retainers of the Hatakeyama clan 5 Clan castles 6 See also 7 References7.1 SourcesHistory[edit] The first family being extinct in 1205, Ashikaga Yoshizumi, son of Ashikaga Yoshikane, was chosen by Hōjō Tokimasa to revive the name of Hatakeyama
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Kanamori Clan
Kanamori Nagachika
Kanamori Nagachika
(金森 長近, 1524 – September 20, 1608) was a Japanese samurai who lived from the Sengoku period
Sengoku period
into the early Edo period. He was the first ruler of the Kanamori clan
Kanamori clan
and served as a retainer of the Oda, Toyotomi, and Tokugawa clans. Later in his life, he also became a daimyō.[1] Nagachika first served the Saitō clan of Mino Province; however, after their demise, he became a retainer of Oda Nobunaga. During this time he served as the ruler of Matsukura Castle
Matsukura Castle
and Takayama Castle. Nagachika was also a tea master and an admirer of Sen no Rikyū. After Toyotomi Hideyoshi
Toyotomi Hideyoshi
ordered Rikyū's death, Nagachika sheltered Rikyū's son, Sen Dōan. References[edit]Wikimedia Commons has media related to Kanamori Nagachika.^ "金森戦記 金森長近". Geocities.jp
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Mogami Clan
Mogami clan (最上氏) were Japanese daimyōs, and were a branch of the Ashikaga family. In the Sengoku period, they were the Sengoku daimyōs who ruled Dewa Province
Dewa Province
which is now Yamagata Prefecture
Yamagata Prefecture
and Akita Prefecture
Akita Prefecture
. The Mogami clan is derived from the Shiba clan
Shiba clan
that was a branch of the Ashikaga clan
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Oda Clan
The Oda clan
Oda clan
(織田氏, Oda-shi) was a family of Japanese daimyōs who were to become an important political force in the unification of Japan
Japan
in the mid-16th century. Though they had the climax of their fame under Oda Nobunaga
Oda Nobunaga
and fell from the spotlight soon after, several branches of the family continued as daimyō houses until the Meiji Restoration.Contents1 History1.1 Origins 1.2 Independence 1.3 Nobunaga's reign 1.4 Edo period2 Descendants 3 Notable figures 4 Senior retainer families 5 Nobunaga's notable retainers 6 Clan castles 7 ReferencesHistory[edit] Origins[edit] The Oda family in the time of Nobunaga claimed descent from the Taira clan, by Taira no Chikazane, a grandson of Taira no Shigemori (1138–1179). Taira no Chikazane established himself at Oda (Echizen Province) and took its name
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Ōtomo Clan
Ōtomo clan
Ōtomo clan
(大友氏, Ōtomo-shi) was a Japanese family whose power stretched from the Kamakura period
Kamakura period
through the Sengoku period, spanning over 400 years. The clan's hereditary lands lay in Kyūshū. Following the establishment of the Kamakura shogunate
Kamakura shogunate
in 1185, members of the clan were granted the post of Constable (Shugo) of Bungo and Buzen Provinces in Kyūshū. As the Ōtomo were one of the major clans of Kyūshū, along with the Shōni and the Shimazu, they had a central role in organizing efforts against the Mongol invasions of Japan
Japan
in 1274 and 1281. They also played an important role in the establishment of the Ashikaga shogunate, in the 1330s
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Takeda Clan
The Takeda clan
Takeda clan
(武田氏, Takeda-shi) was a Japanese clan active from the late Heian period
Heian period
until the late 16th century. The clan was historically based in Kai Province
Kai Province
in present-day Yamanashi Prefecture.[1][2] The clan was known for their honorable actions under the rule of Takeda Shingen, one of the most famous rulers of the period
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Tsutsui Clan
Tsutsui clan
Tsutsui clan
a Japanese clan originating during the Sengoku period (16th century) of Japan. Throughout the time of the 16th century, the Tsutsui clan
Tsutsui clan
would mainly control the Yamato Province, due to the efforts of the feudal lord (daimyō) Tsutsui Junkei. The Tsutsui soon on became a retainer family under that of the Oda clan, resulting in a minor rise within their power. After Junkei had been killed during a certain battle against Oda Nobuo, the power of the Tsutsui fell away to a high extent. The Tsutsui families past is unknown past this point. The Tsutsui are well known for a samurai under the service named Shima Sakon, though he later became a rōnin. References[edit] The Samurai SourcebookThis Japanese clan article is a stub
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Daimyō
The daimyō (大名, IPA: [daimʲoː] ( listen)) were powerful Japanese feudal lords[1] who, until their decline in the early Meiji period, ruled most of Japan from their vast, hereditary land holdings. In the term, dai (大) means "large", and myō stands for myōden (名田), meaning private land.[2] Subordinate only to the shōgun, daimyōs were the most powerful feudal rulers from the 10th century to the middle 19th century in Japan. From the Shugo of the Muromachi period
Muromachi period
through the Sengoku to the daimyōs of the Edo
Edo
period, the rank had a long and varied history
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Yamana Clan
The Yamana clan
Yamana clan
(山名氏, Yamana-shi) was a Japanese samurai clan which was one of the most powerful of the Muromachi period (1336-1467); at its peak, members of the family held the position of Constable (shugo) over eleven provinces. Originally from Kōzuke Province, and later centered in Inaba province, the clan claimed descendance from the Seiwa Genji
Seiwa Genji
line, and from Minamoto no Yoshishige in particular. The clan took its name from the village of Yamana in present-day Gunma Prefecture. They were valued retainers under Minamoto no Yoritomo, and counted among his gokenin.[1] The Yamana were among the chief clans in fighting for the establishment of the Ashikaga shogunate, and thus remained valued and powerful under the new government. They were Constables of five provinces in 1363, and eleven a short time later
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Boshin War
1868 Imperial Court Tozama:Satchō Alliance Satsuma Domain Chōshū DomainOther tozama daimyōs: Tosa Domain Hiroshima Domain Tsu Domain Saga Domain Ōgaki Domain Hirosaki Domain Kuroishi Domain Yodo Domain1868 Shogunate Aizu
Aizu
Domain Takamatsu Domain Northern Alliance Jōzai Domain Tsuruoka Domain Kuwana Domain Matsuyama Domain Defected: Tsu Domain Yodo Domain Ōgaki Domain1869  Empire of JapanSupported by:  United Kingdom of Great Britain and Ireland1869 Republic of EzoSupported by:  French Empire
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Tokugawa Clan
The Tokugawa clan
Tokugawa clan
(徳川氏、德川氏, Tokugawa-shi or Tokugawa-uji) was a powerful daimyō family of Japan. They nominally descended from Emperor Seiwa
Emperor Seiwa
(850–880) and were a branch of the Minamoto clan
Minamoto clan
(Seiwa Genji) by the Nitta clan. The early history of this clan remains a mystery.[1] Members of the clan ruled Japan
Japan
as shōguns from 1603 to 1867.Contents1 History 2 Simplified genealogy, showing complete lines of descent 3 Crest 4 Family members 5 Retainers5.1 Clans 5.2 Important retainers6 References 7 External linksHistory[edit] Minamoto no Yoshishige (1135–1202), grandson of Minamoto no Yoshiie (1041–1108), was the first to take the name of Nitta
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