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Harzburg Front
The Harzburg Front
Harzburg Front
(German: Harzburger Front) was a short-lived radical right-wing,[1] anti-democratic[2] political alliance in Weimar Germany, formed in 1931 as an attempt to present a unified opposition to the government of Chancellor Heinrich Brüning
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German Language
No official regulation ( German orthography
German orthography
regulated by the Council for German Orthography[4]). Language
Language
codesISO 639-1 deISO 639-2 ger
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Theodor Duesterberg
Theodor Duesterberg
Theodor Duesterberg
(German pronunciation: [ˈdyːstɐbɛʁk]; October 19, 1875 – November 4, 1950) was a leader of the Stahlhelm, Bund der Frontsoldaten, in Germany
Germany
prior to the Nazi seizure of power.Contents1 Background 2 Stahlhelm, Bund der Frontsoldaten 3 1932 presidential election 4 Arrest 5 References 6 External linksBackground[edit] Born the son of an army surgeon in Darmstadt, Duesterberg entered the Prussian Army
Prussian Army
in 1893 after training in the cadet corps. In 1900, Duesterberg was part of the East Asian Expedition Corps that saw action in China
China
during the Boxer Rebellion. Two years later, Duesterberg became an officer and held a variety of army commands prior to World War I
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Reichsführer-SS
Reichsführer-SS
Reichsführer-SS
(German: [ˈʁaɪçsˌfyːʁɐ ˈɛs ˈɛs] ( listen), " Reich Leader-SS") was a special title and rank that existed between the years of 1925 and 1945 for the commander of the Schutzstaffel
Schutzstaffel
(SS). Reichsführer-SS
Reichsführer-SS
was a title from 1925 to 1933, and from 1934 to 1945 it was the highest rank of the SS. The longest serving and by far most noteworthy Reichsführer-SS
Reichsführer-SS
was Heinrich Himmler.Contents1 Definition 2 Duties 3 Relationship with the Waffen-SS 4 Kommandostab Reichsführer-SS 5 Office holders 6 In popular culture 7 Notes 8 References8.1 Citations 8.2 BibliographyDefinition[edit] Reichsführer-SS
Reichsführer-SS
was both a title and a rank. The title of Reichsführer was first created in 1926 by the second commander of the SS, Joseph Berchtold
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Heinrich Himmler
Heinrich Luitpold Himmler (German: [ˈhaɪnʁɪç ˈluːɪtˌpɔlt ˈhɪmlɐ] ( listen); 7 October 1900 – 23 May 1945) was Reichsführer of the Schutzstaffel
Schutzstaffel
(Protection Squadron; SS), and a leading member of the Nazi Party
Nazi Party
(NSDAP) of Germany. Himmler was one of the most powerful men in Nazi Germany
Nazi Germany
and one of the people most directly responsible for the Holocaust. As a member of a reserve battalion during World War I, Himmler did not see active service. He studied agronomy in university, and joined the Nazi Party
Nazi Party
in 1923 and the SS in 1925. In 1929, he was appointed Reichsführer-SS
Reichsführer-SS
by Hitler. Over the next 16 years, he developed the SS from a mere 290-man battalion into a million-strong paramilitary group, and, following Hitler's orders, set up and controlled the Nazi concentration camps
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Reichstag (Weimar Republic)
The Reichstag (English: Diet of the Realm[1]) was a legislative body of Weimar Germany (the "German Reich") from 1919, when it succeeded the Weimar National Assembly, until the Nazi takeover in 1933.Contents1 Overview 2 Home 3 Elections results 4 See also 5 References 6 External linksOverview[edit] Although German constitutional commentators consider only the Reichstag and now the Bundestag
Bundestag
to be the German parliament, in fact since 1871 Germany has been governed by a bicameral legislature, of which the Reichstag served as a lower house and the Reichsrat (after 1949 the Bundesrat) as the upper house. Constitutionally, the Reichsrat represented the governments of the federal German states. According to the 1919 Weimar Constitution, the members of the Reichstag were to be elected by general universal suffrage according to the principle of proportional representation. Votes were cast for nationwide party lists
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Hermann Göring
Hermann Wilhelm Göring (or Goering;[a] German: [ˈɡøːʁɪŋ] ( listen); 12 January 1893 – 15 October 1946) was a German political and military leader as well as one of the most powerful figures in the Nazi Party
Nazi Party
(NSDAP) that ruled Germany
Germany
from 1933 to 1945. A veteran World War I
World War I
fighter pilot ace, he was a recipient of the Pour le Mérite. He was the last commander of Jagdgeschwader 1, the fighter wing once led by Manfred von Richthofen. An early member of the Nazi Party, Göring was among those wounded in Adolf Hitler's failed Beer Hall Putsch
Beer Hall Putsch
in 1923. While receiving treatment for his injuries, he developed an addiction to morphine which persisted until the last year of his life
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House Of Hohenzollern
The House of Hohenzollern
House of Hohenzollern
[ˈhoːənˌʦɔlɐn] is a dynasty of former princes, electors, kings and emperors of Hohenzollern, Brandenburg, Prussia, the German Empire, and Romania. The family arose in the area around the town of Hechingen
Hechingen
in Swabia
Swabia
during the 11th century and took their name from Hohenzollern Castle.[1] The first ancestor of the Hohenzollerns was mentioned in 1061. The Hohenzollern family split into two branches, the Catholic Swabian branch and the Protestant Franconian branch,[2] which later became the Brandenburg-Prussian branch. The Swabian branch ruled the principalities of Hohenzollern-Hechingen
Hohenzollern-Hechingen
and Hohenzollern-Sigmaringen until 1849, and also ruled Romania
Romania
from 1866 to 1947
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Prince Eitel Friedrich Of Prussia
Prince Eitel Friedrich of Prussia
Prussia
(Wilhelm Eitel Friedrich Christian Karl; 7 July 1883 – 8 December 1942) was the second son of Emperor Wilhelm II of Germany
Germany
by his first wife, Augusta Viktoria of Schleswig-Holstein. He was born and died in Potsdam, Germany.Contents1 Life and activities 2 Regimental Commissions[2] 3 Chivalric Orders[2] 4 Military Decorations (1914–1918) 5 Ancestry 6 References 7 SourcesLife and activities[edit] On 27 February 1906, Prince Eitel married Duchess Sophia Charlotte of Oldenburg
Oldenburg
(2 February 1879 Oldenburg
Oldenburg
– 29 March 1964 Westerstede) in Berlin. They were divorced on 20 October 1926 on the grounds of her adultery before the war
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Prince August Wilhelm Of Prussia
Prince August Wilhelm Heinrich Günther Viktor of Prussia
Prussia
(29 January 1887 – 25 March 1949), called "Auwi", was the fourth son of Emperor Wilhelm II, German Emperor
Wilhelm II, German Emperor
by his first wife, Augusta Victoria of Schleswig-Holstein.Contents1 Early life 2 Weimar Republic 3 Involvement with National Socialism 4 Post World War II 5 Regimental Commissions through World War I 6 Chivalric Orders 7 Ancestry 8 ReferencesEarly life[edit] He was born in the Potsdamer Stadtschloss when his grandfather was still the Crown Prince of Prussia. He spent his youth with his siblings at the New Palace, also in Potsdam, and his school days at the Prinzenhaus
Prinzenhaus
in Plön. Later, he studied at the universities of Bonn, Berlin and Strasbourg
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Wilhelm II, German Emperor
Wilhelm II (Friedrich Wilhelm Viktor Albert von Hohenzollern; 27 January 1859 – 4 June 1941) was the last German Emperor (Kaiser) and King of Prussia, ruling the German Empire
German Empire
and the Kingdom of Prussia
Prussia
from 15 June 1888 to 9 November 1918. He was the eldest grandchild of the Queen Victoria
Queen Victoria
of the United Kingdom and related to many monarchs and princes of Europe, most notably King George V
George V
of the United Kingdom and Emperor Nicholas II
Nicholas II
of Russia. Acceding to the throne in 1888, he dismissed the Chancellor, Otto von Bismarck, in 1890. He also launched Germany
Germany
on a bellicose "New Course" in foreign affairs that culminated in his support for Austria-Hungary
Austria-Hungary
in the crisis of July 1914 that led in a matter of days to the First World War
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Walther Von Lüttwitz
Smilo Freiherr von Lüttwitz
Smilo Freiherr von Lüttwitz
(son) Heinrich Freiherr von Lüttwitz (nephew) Kurt von Hammerstein-Equord (son in law) Walther von Lüttwitz
Walther von Lüttwitz
or Walther Freiherr von Lüttwitz (2 February 1859 – 20 September 1942) was a German general who fought in World War I
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German Federal Election, 1930
Heinrich Brüning CentreElected Chancellor None (Brüning remained unelected Chancellor)The German federal election occurred on 14 September 1930.[1] Despite losing 10 seats, the Social Democratic Party of Germany
Social Democratic Party of Germany
(SPD) remained the largest party in the Reichstag, winning 143 of the 577 seats, whilst the Nazi Party
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Reichswehr
The Reichswehr
Reichswehr
(English: Realm Defence) formed the military organisation of Germany from 1919 until 1935, when it was united with the new Wehrmacht
Wehrmacht
(Defence Force).Contents1 Founding 2 State within the state 3 Creation of the Wehrmacht 4 See also 5 References 6 External linksFounding[edit] At the end of World War I, the forces of the German Empire
German Empire
had mostly split up, the men making their way home individually or in small groups. Many of them joined the Freikorps
Freikorps
(Free Corps), a collection of volunteer paramilitary units that were involved in suppressing the German Revolution
German Revolution
and border clashes between 1918 and 1923. The Reichswehr
Reichswehr
was limited to a standing army of 100,000 men,[1] and a navy of 15,000
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German People's Party
The German People's Party
German People's Party
(German: Deutsche Volkspartei, or DVP) was a national liberal party in Weimar Germany
Weimar Germany
and a successor to the National Liberal Party of the German Empire. A right-wing liberal[9][10] or conservative-liberal[6][11][12] party, its most famous member was Chancellor and Foreign Minister Gustav Stresemann, a 1926 Nobel Peace Prize
Nobel Peace Prize
laureate.Contents1 Ideology 2 History 3 Electoral results 4 References 5 See alsoIdeology[edit] It was essentially the main body of the old National Liberal Party (mostly its centre and right factions) combined with some of the more moderate elements of the Free Conservative Party and the Economic Union,[13] and was formed in the early days of the Weimar Republic
Weimar Republic
by Stresemann
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Fritz Thyssen
Friedrich "Fritz" Thyssen (9 November 1873 – 8 February 1951) was a German businessman, born into one of Germany's leading industrial families.Contents1 Biography1.1 Youth 1.2 Weimar Germany 1.3 Nazi Germany 1.4 World War II 1.5 Later life2 See also 3 References 4 External linksBiography[edit] Youth[edit] Thyssen was born in Mülheim
Mülheim
in the Ruhr area. His father, August, was head of the Thyssen mining and steelmaking company, which had been founded by his father Friedrich and was based in the Ruhr city of Duisburg. Thyssen studied mining and metallurgy in London, Liège, and Berlin, and after a short period of service in the German Army he joined the family business. On 18 January 1900 in Düsseldorf
Düsseldorf
he married Amelie Helle or Zurhelle ( Mülheim
Mülheim
am Rhein, 11 December 1877 – Puchdorf bei Straubing, 25 August 1965), daughter of a factory owner
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